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Murky
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Prop 8 passes http://www.queerty.com/early-votes-project-prop-8-passage-20081105/
Toggle Commented Nov 5, 2008 on YES WE DID at WWdN: In Exile
1 reply
Prop 8 passes http://www.queerty.com/early-votes-project-prop-8-passage-20081105/
Toggle Commented Nov 5, 2008 on YES WE DID at WWdN: In Exile
1 reply
The second comment is 'welcome to socialism'?! Americans as a rule would not know socialism if it snuck up on them wearing a Fidel Castro beard and bit them on the bottom. Democrats are far from socialists - Republicans and Democrats are so close, it's amazing how much antagonism there can be. Overall, this time I was reasonably pleased with both candidates. The usual mud-slinging was at a minimum, they were civil. (Their supporters were not though!) In another year, I would have been pleased with McCain. In 2004, I wanted Kerry to beat Bush, but it it had been Kerry-McCain, I would have wanted McCain. McCain is someone who is not the typical neo-con (that's why he picked Palin, for balance) - and the 'old style' republican who doesn't do all the neo-con bible thumping is good to see. Unfortunately, he played to his base a little too much, and did pick up some of those attributes. That said, I am very pleased. What I want in a US president (as a non-US person) is someone intelligent, who recognises areas in which he/she is not all-knowing - and then get the best advice before making a decision. This is why I was relieved when Hillary got knocked out - that thing about making a virtue from ignoring advice from every economist going about the 'gas tax break' (petrol) was simply horrid. It's amazing how prescient the final season of 'The West Wing' was... but then, in writing Santos, they did shadow Obama for a while. Now, to make it perfect, McCain has to be offered a job advising on foreign affairs... From the start, everything Obama did was 'presidential'. He was polite, civil, he just looked the part.... and he was thoughtful. His most impressive speech I saw was the one where he explained his reasons for not wanting the tax break on fuel. He took an unpopular stance, but took the long term position which followed the best economic advice available at the time. Ultimately, I want to see a president able to change his mind in the light of new information. For me, the classic 'I voted for it, until I voted against it' was a poor turn of phrase, but exactly what I want the president to be able to do.... evaluate new information. I get the sense that Obama can do this.
Toggle Commented Nov 5, 2008 on YES WE DID at WWdN: In Exile
1 reply
The second comment is 'welcome to socialism'?! Americans as a rule would not know socialism if it snuck up on them wearing a Fidel Castro beard and bit them on the bottom. Democrats are far from socialists - Republicans and Democrats are so close, it's amazing how much antagonism there can be. Overall, this time I was reasonably pleased with both candidates. The usual mud-slinging was at a minimum, they were civil. (Their supporters were not though!) In another year, I would have been pleased with McCain. In 2004, I wanted Kerry to beat Bush, but it it had been Kerry-McCain, I would have wanted McCain. McCain is someone who is not the typical neo-con (that's why he picked Palin, for balance) - and the 'old style' republican who doesn't do all the neo-con bible thumping is good to see. Unfortunately, he played to his base a little too much, and did pick up some of those attributes. That said, I am very pleased. What I want in a US president (as a non-US person) is someone intelligent, who recognises areas in which he/she is not all-knowing - and then get the best advice before making a decision. This is why I was relieved when Hillary got knocked out - that thing about making a virtue from ignoring advice from every economist going about the 'gas tax break' (petrol) was simply horrid. It's amazing how prescient the final season of 'The West Wing' was... but then, in writing Santos, they did shadow Obama for a while. Now, to make it perfect, McCain has to be offered a job advising on foreign affairs... From the start, everything Obama did was 'presidential'. He was polite, civil, he just looked the part.... and he was thoughtful. His most impressive speech I saw was the one where he explained his reasons for not wanting the tax break on fuel. He took an unpopular stance, but took the long term position which followed the best economic advice available at the time. Ultimately, I want to see a president able to change his mind in the light of new information. For me, the classic 'I voted for it, until I voted against it' was a poor turn of phrase, but exactly what I want the president to be able to do.... evaluate new information. I get the sense that Obama can do this.
Toggle Commented Nov 5, 2008 on YES WE DID at WWdN: In Exile
1 reply
My first year at University, in halls, we would all crowd into the TV room for TNG. I well remember how cramped it was in there for the first Borg rematch... "I am Locutus of Borg" Da-Da-- Dah! Dah! Dah! 'The was the last in the current series of...' Aaarrrghhhh! All good clean fun. (About a year later, B5 came out - I'm so glad I stuck with *that* one past season 1, little did we know how good that'd get).
1 reply
My first year at University, in halls, we would all crowd into the TV room for TNG. I well remember how cramped it was in there for the first Borg rematch... "I am Locutus of Borg" Da-Da-- Dah! Dah! Dah! 'The was the last in the current series of...' Aaarrrghhhh! All good clean fun. (About a year later, B5 came out - I'm so glad I stuck with *that* one past season 1, little did we know how good that'd get).
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eek, bad grammar there. Apologies.
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eek, bad grammar there. Apologies.
1 reply
Schneier's book, 'applied cryptography' was very amusing, in that in the US it came with a CD Rom - which was illegal to export to us here in Europe. The book also contained source code in printed form, which it was legal to export this from the US (free speech)....
1 reply
Schneier's book, 'applied cryptography' was very amusing, in that in the US it came with a CD Rom - which was illegal to export to us here in Europe. The book also contained source code in printed form, which it was legal to export this from the US (free speech)....
1 reply
As an aside - I once walked smack into Patrick Stewart in the west end in London. He was head down, heading for the theatre at a huge speed, we each apologised and walked on... then I had the 'hang on a second....' moment - by which time he had vanished. I had my camera in my bag. I'd have loved a photo. Ah well - the man was obviously wanting to get into his play, and it would have been rude anyway. Paul Merton (UK comedian) was someone I met in a bookshop. He was doing a book signing about 15 years ago now - I had a nice chat with him, my now-wife stood there, jaw open, going hummana hummana.... I've also met Hislop, he was a nice chap. Very down to earth. Again, no photo from either. Mark Little was a great guy (he's an Australian comedian). We saw him in Manchester, and afterwards went for a drink. He came into the bar. We thanked him for a great show, he said 'ah, I remember you, on the left, near the front...' Well done, that man. No photo. Leonard Nimoy was a brief encounter. Booksigning. Huge queue. No photo. James May (Captain Slow from Top Gear) was very cool though. Another huge book signing queue, but he was taking his time and talking to people. He had a cold at the time - but soldiered on. I have a nice photo of this meeting though. The trouble is that 'famous' people get so many requests on their time from strangers, it must be tricky for them to make new acquaintances in the usual way - which is unfortunate. It must be quite awkward when single and dating.... and knowing this, how does one say 'hello' without appearing like just another fanboy idiot? Without saying something that's been said thousands of times before? However, I do enjoy seeing that you get that awkward feeling too ... If you ever come to the South of the UK, Wil - and if I ever run into you when you do - I'll unsuccessfully try to avoid the usual conversation "hehe, you're that guy from Star Trek"... but a photo of that meet would be nice!
1 reply
As an aside - I once walked smack into Patrick Stewart in the west end in London. He was head down, heading for the theatre at a huge speed, we each apologised and walked on... then I had the 'hang on a second....' moment - by which time he had vanished. I had my camera in my bag. I'd have loved a photo. Ah well - the man was obviously wanting to get into his play, and it would have been rude anyway. Paul Merton (UK comedian) was someone I met in a bookshop. He was doing a book signing about 15 years ago now - I had a nice chat with him, my now-wife stood there, jaw open, going hummana hummana.... I've also met Hislop, he was a nice chap. Very down to earth. Again, no photo from either. Mark Little was a great guy (he's an Australian comedian). We saw him in Manchester, and afterwards went for a drink. He came into the bar. We thanked him for a great show, he said 'ah, I remember you, on the left, near the front...' Well done, that man. No photo. Leonard Nimoy was a brief encounter. Booksigning. Huge queue. No photo. James May (Captain Slow from Top Gear) was very cool though. Another huge book signing queue, but he was taking his time and talking to people. He had a cold at the time - but soldiered on. I have a nice photo of this meeting though. The trouble is that 'famous' people get so many requests on their time from strangers, it must be tricky for them to make new acquaintances in the usual way - which is unfortunate. It must be quite awkward when single and dating.... and knowing this, how does one say 'hello' without appearing like just another fanboy idiot? Without saying something that's been said thousands of times before? However, I do enjoy seeing that you get that awkward feeling too ... If you ever come to the South of the UK, Wil - and if I ever run into you when you do - I'll unsuccessfully try to avoid the usual conversation "hehe, you're that guy from Star Trek"... but a photo of that meet would be nice!
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That security guard sounds like a real jobsworth.... especially when you're there as a guest of the organisers. It'd be bad enough if she was talking to members of the public, let alone guests.
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That security guard sounds like a real jobsworth.... especially when you're there as a guest of the organisers. It'd be bad enough if she was talking to members of the public, let alone guests.
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You really should email and say 'So, when shall I come round?' That'd be cool...
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You really should email and say 'So, when shall I come round?' That'd be cool...
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I was waiting for you to show up of GTCMS... You've done the Policeman, you've done GTCMS.... all that's left is the Guild and 'Two Hot Girls' and you've got the Quadrilogy. Hmm.... I wonder which of those options is more appealing to Mushy? http://www.murky.org/blg/gorgeous-tiny-chickens-and-wil/
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I was waiting for you to show up of GTCMS... You've done the Policeman, you've done GTCMS.... all that's left is the Guild and 'Two Hot Girls' and you've got the Quadrilogy. Hmm.... I wonder which of those options is more appealing to Mushy? http://www.murky.org/blg/gorgeous-tiny-chickens-and-wil/
1 reply
So... what about 'Jackie Brown'? Personally, my list of favourite Tarantinos changes with mood... but Jackie Brown is often a top contender.
Toggle Commented Mar 17, 2008 on and now, little green bag at WWdN: In Exile
1 reply
So... what about 'Jackie Brown'? Personally, my list of favourite Tarantinos changes with mood... but Jackie Brown is often a top contender.
Toggle Commented Mar 17, 2008 on and now, little green bag at WWdN: In Exile
1 reply
typo - sorry. 'that you rated' Personally, I've a soft spot for 'Jackie Brown'. Pam Greer is great in that, the opening sequence is fantastic.
Toggle Commented Mar 17, 2008 on and now, little green bag at WWdN: In Exile
1 reply
typo - sorry. 'that you rated' Personally, I've a soft spot for 'Jackie Brown'. Pam Greer is great in that, the opening sequence is fantastic.
Toggle Commented Mar 17, 2008 on and now, little green bag at WWdN: In Exile
1 reply
I take exception that rate 'Death Proof' as 'uncool' - we've just got the full cuts of Planet Terror and Death Proof (we never got the Grindhouse release in the UK). Both are cool, but differently so. I prefer Death Proof - Zoe Bell is just great. The DVD extras are worth a watch... Hey Sally!
Toggle Commented Mar 17, 2008 on and now, little green bag at WWdN: In Exile
1 reply
I take exception that rate 'Death Proof' as 'uncool' - we've just got the full cuts of Planet Terror and Death Proof (we never got the Grindhouse release in the UK). Both are cool, but differently so. I prefer Death Proof - Zoe Bell is just great. The DVD extras are worth a watch... Hey Sally!
Toggle Commented Mar 17, 2008 on and now, little green bag at WWdN: In Exile
1 reply
Yep, it's all about the first doctor. For me, it's Tom Baker (who was the first doctor for many as he was there for so long). I've got a soft spot for Peter Davidson (he had a nice spot where he was floating in space midway between a spaceship and his tardis, he would float there forever - so he saved himself using his cricket ball.... in such a way that he managed to keep the ball). Colin Baker (no relation) didn't do it for me, and Sylvester McCoy suffered from the BBC trying to kill it off (though he had a great Dalek episode). I particularly liked 'the five doctors', which showed doctors one to five all interacting.... The new Who is pretty watchable, though can at times be a bit sentimental for my tastes, sunbathing dalek? puh-leese. However, you can't argue with the fact that it's back and it's big again.... FWIW, David Tennant's Doctor was Peter Davidson (and they alluded to this in a 'Children in Need' short).
Toggle Commented Dec 30, 2007 on genesis of the daleks at WWdN: In Exile
1 reply