This is Daniel Green's Typepad Profile.
Join Typepad and start following Daniel Green's activity
Join Now!
Already a member? Sign In
Daniel Green
Interests: Good writing, creative and critical.
Recent Activity
Way back in 2005, I wrote a few short reviews for a now defunct publication called Playback St. Louis. I had thought these reviews were forever lost, but have now successfully retrieved them. Because I feel I owe it to posterity (someone's posterity, anyway), I am here posting two of... Continue reading
Posted 6 days ago at The Reading Experience
RIP, Stephen Dixon. From my 2016 review of his Late Stories: Reviewers of Stephen Dixon’s fiction often take note of the author’s continuing lack of widespread recognition, despite the high esteem for his work expressed by many writers and critics. By now it is no doubt unlikely that Dixon’s work... Continue reading
Posted Nov 6, 2019 at The Reading Experience
From my 2014 essay on Peter Handke: "For readers familiar with the controversy in which Handke was embroiled when he seemed to defend the government of Serbia as it was committing atrocities in Bosnia and Kosovo, [Repetition] might plausibly help to put Handke’s actions, which might otherwise seem inexplicable, in... Continue reading
Posted Nov 4, 2019 at The Reading Experience
"Why," asks James Draney at the beginning of his review of Fredric Jameson's latest book, Allegory and Ideology, "does Fredric Jameson’s interpretive method — his insistence that the political interpretation of texts constitutes the 'absolute horizon' of all meaning — still call for defense in today's academic scene?" I'm not... Continue reading
Posted Aug 30, 2019 at The Reading Experience
At the Bookseller, Adam Blades, a "lecturer in Publishing," attempts to defend "celebrity tastemakers" (those with "book clubs") by making this claim about actual literary critics: On the contrary, literary critics have rarely been objective. From Edgar Allen [sic] Poe to Elizabeth Hardwick, all promote their own approach to book... Continue reading
Posted Aug 26, 2019 at The Reading Experience
My review of Albert Rolls's The Demon in the Text can now be found at Review 31. From Rolls’s perspective on the way the ‘life’ inflects the work in Pynchon’s case, it would seem that Pynchon’s fiction is a near-reversal of TS Eliot’s dictum that a literary work is an... Continue reading
Posted Jul 21, 2019 at The Reading Experience
My review of Jane Alison's book Meander, Spiral, Explode can now be found at Full Stop. The kind of formal experiment Alison is eager to encourage is pretty much encapsulated in the book’s title. Meander, spiral, and explosion are forms of spatial movement, although Alison also discusses additional such forms:... Continue reading
Posted Jul 21, 2019 at The Reading Experience
(This essay was published a long time ago--as most of the references attest--in a now defunct online journal. Since as far as I can tell its archives no longer exist, I am re-posting the essay here. I mostly still agree with it.) Much has been written about the purported dominance... Continue reading
Posted Jul 9, 2019 at The Reading Experience
(This essay was published in American Book Review in 2000, but has never been available online.) In his book In Plato’s Cave, Alvin Kernan describes a career crisis that he no doubt shared with many other literary scholars of his generation: The canon of great books, authors and their powerful... Continue reading
Posted Jun 27, 2019 at The Reading Experience
(I recently rediscovered the following essay, written a number of years ago but no longer, as far as I can tell, available online. It still seems relevant, and thus I am reposting it here.) Steven Pinker’s The Blank Slate is as thorough a refutation of the premises underlying radical social... Continue reading
Posted Jun 23, 2019 at The Reading Experience
In "Book Blogs as Tastemakers," an article by Beth Driscoll published in the Australian academic journal Participations: Journal of Audience and Reception Studies, the author discusses two "networks" of literary blogs, Romance fiction blogs and what she calls "highbrow literary blogs," to determine their influence "as shared expressions of readers’aesthetic... Continue reading
Posted May 30, 2019 at The Reading Experience
Image
A study of the novels of the American writer James Purdy. Includes discussions of most of the novels, although some emphasis is given to the paradigm-establishing works of the 1960s and 1970s. Excerpts: "Although in some ways Purdy was altogether attuned to the literary spirit of his time, especially in... Continue reading
Posted May 28, 2019 at TRE Press
Image
A collection of essays considering the current state of general-interest book reviewing. Topics include: negative vs. positive reviewing, gatekeeping, writers reviewing writers, and criticism in cyberspace, among others. From "Book Reviewing in America": "Critical judgment can never be avoided entirely; it always lies behind discussions of aesthetic merit. But in... Continue reading
Posted May 28, 2019 at TRE Press
Image
In the early to mid 1960s, an iconoclastic mode of American fiction that came to be called "black humor" presaged the larger movement succeeding it that eventually came to be known as postmodernism. This book looks at the essential features of black humor fiction, with essays on all the major... Continue reading
Posted May 28, 2019 at TRE Press
Image
Essays on the first-generation American postmodernists: John Barth, William Gass, Robert Coover, Raymond Federman, Gilbert Sorrentino, Donald Barthelme, John Hawkes, Ishmael Reed, Thomas Pynchon, Don DeLillo, Joseph McElroy, Harry Mathews. From the opening essay, "Postmodern Fiction in the New Millennium": "Although the term has come to identify a general attitude... Continue reading
Posted May 28, 2019 at TRE Press
Image
A selection of essays on current women writers of innovative fiction whose work has clearly expanded the range of practices associated with "experimental" writing. "I offer here no overarching theory about the nature or direction of innovative writing by women writers, although as I do note in several of the... Continue reading
Posted May 28, 2019 at TRE Press
Image
This book surveys formally and stylistically adventurous fiction by American writers of the late 20th and early 21st centuries. From "Definitions: "For those who think that every new work of fiction is implicitly experimental, necessarily one-of-a-kind, the term seems redundant. For writers who want their work to be assessed, at... Continue reading
Posted May 27, 2019 at TRE Press
Image
What do we talk about when we talk about literature? This book explores that question by, first of all, looking "inside the text" at the dynamics of reading and the tangible effects of writing. It then moves "outside the text" to consider the relevance of social context and culture to... Continue reading
Posted May 27, 2019 at TRE Press
Image
The Idea of Literature surveys a variety of topics related to the appreciation of literature. It collects writing (revised and expanded) that originally appeared on The Reading Experience. (More information) Free pdf Kindle ebook Among the topics considered: The Experience of Reading/ Literary Style/ "Saying Something"/ The Study of Literature... Continue reading
Posted May 27, 2019 at TRE Press
My review of Remedia, the new novel by Michael Joyce, is now available at Full Stop: Michael Joyce is not only the author of what many consider the foundational work of hypertext fiction, afternoon, a love story(1987), but also probably the most important theoretician of hypertext as a literary medium... Continue reading
Posted Apr 4, 2019 at The Reading Experience
Some passages in my original draft of the essay on James Purdy's poetry recently published by the Poetry Foundation had to be excised for reasons of space and relevance. But I still rather like much of what I said in them, so I am reprinting them here rather than discard... Continue reading
Posted Mar 28, 2019 at The Reading Experience
My essay on the poetry of James Purdy has now been published by the Poetry Foundation: Purdy wrote lyric poems throughout most of his career, although he confessed that he might have stopped had the composer Richard Hundley not set one of the poems (“Come Ready and See Me”) to... Continue reading
Posted Mar 11, 2019 at The Reading Experience
"In the Author’s Note, Michael cites the final word of Updike’s Rabbit quartet — 'Enough' — to assert an end to his own series. The 'Keever Books' don’t much resemble Updike’s famous novels, other than through the most obvious parallels: four novels about a basketball player after his heyday. LeClair... Continue reading
Posted Mar 5, 2019 at The Reading Experience
I offer here no overarching theory about the nature or direction of innovative writing by women writers, although as I do note in several of the essays in the first section, there is a recognizable affinity among numerous current writers for what I am here calling "fabulation." Otherwise it seems... Continue reading
Posted Feb 25, 2019 at Innovative Women Writers
My review of David Hayden's Darker with the Lights on has been published at the literary Journal Splice: Darker With the Lights On evokes a filtering and transmutation of everyday reality, but these stories are at once both more purposeful and less insistently symbolic than dreams, more cogent than the... Continue reading
Posted Feb 18, 2019 at The Reading Experience