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offscauta
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"Maybe his death is what causes the explosion, so the Daleks have to keep him alive at all costs by putting him in the Pandorica so he will be protected for ever." If this were the case, the Daleks could never again try to kill the Doctor. Which would be a mistake in storytelling terms. Also, how do they know what happened to the TARDIS when he regenerated? (For that matter, how did the coallition get Amy's name and address?)
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"I wonder if he'll keep this up? I mean, what's stopping him?" Mucking about in your own timeline has the potential to destroy the universe. Given that this had already happened, the Doctor was free to arse around to his hearts' content. I recall a letter to the Radio Times in 1989 complaining that the letter the Doctor sent to himself in Battlefield had effectively destroyed any drama in the series. 21 years later, we're still coping. Best not to worry too much about it.
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"Anyone notice that it's only when the Doctor questions Amy about her life, and that it makes no sense, that the Cyberman arm suddenly comes to life and starts firing off. " Excellent observation.
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"Ah shit, it’s not fucking Davros is it?" Somewhere in "The Writer's Tale - The Final Chapter" RTD contacts Moffat about using the Daleks for the "The End of Time". According to the book, Moffat says that they have plans for the Daleks, but that RTD could use Davros if he wants. That may not mean anything, but it suggests a Davros free finale.
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My guess as to the mechanism for the solution, if anybody's interested: The Dalek says that the scenario to trap the Doctor was constructed from his companion's memories. I'm assuming that it means Amy. So the future Doctor in Flesh and Stone is telling Amy to remember something that will get him out of the Pandorica, and it's something that he told her (will tell her) as a little girl, possibly after we see Amelia look up and hear the TARDIS engines near the end of the Eleventh Hour. My big question about the episode, which I really hope will be answered next week, is this: If the Daleks think that the Doctor is going to destroy the universe, why are they keeping him alive?
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"Allowing the Doctor to create an entire time stream so that Vincent can tell Amy how hawt she is over the centuries. Yuk." Yeah, agree with you completely there.
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"To that end, why wasn't Dr. Black suddenly very suspicious at the changes in the painting and asking for it to be verified as a fake?" From Doctor Black's point of view the painting hasn't changed, has it? It was always that way.
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"Narrative information is being omitted all over the place, and I don't think it's a script editing problem." I hope you're right, and it's great that you're so optimistic, but I have a horrible feeling that this is just wishful thinking. I genuinely hope that I am wrong.
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"only for one of them to be vaporised by a quick flash of sunlight from Amy's Boots No 7 make up mirror." I found this particularly irritating given that the sky was supposed to be covered with clouds at that point. As far as Amy goes, I can take her or leave her at this point. The way she treats Rory makes it difficult to warm to her. Although that's possibly because I think Rory is a good addition to the TARDIS crew. "with Alex Price as her brother Francesco" Wasn't he her son?
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The jacket thing has got me thinking about that injection River gave Amy in part one. It seemed to me to be set up for something to happen in part two, but now that we know that this isn't the first time River meets Amy I suspect that injection will be a future plot point. Or maybe not.
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"Since when did Daleks care about the timelines so much they wanted to return to their own continuity anyway? " To quote the seventh Doctor: "Even the Daleks, ruthless though they are, would think twice before making such a radical alteration to the timelines." Although they obviously didn't have too much of a problem with destroying the Earth in 1940.
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"I may be in the minority but I really enjoy the McCoy era" It's a great minority to be in, though. Excellent review, Neil.
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Has anybody read "The Ones Who Walk Away From Omelas" by Ursula Le Guin? My dad thinks it may be the inspiration for this episode.
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I don't think it was jammed into her brain. The Doctor said she'd lost twenty minutes. Plenty of time to watch the film, record the message and then press the Forget button.
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I also felt that the Doctor's decision to effectively euthanise the whale was taken rather quickly.
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After the Eleventh Hour I was looking forward to a great season, even hoping that there might not be a bad episode in the bunch. But this really didn't work for me. Too many ideas thrown away before being given time to develop, weak acting ("Liz Ten" was rubbish), dodgy CGI and design work (the Space Whale in Torchwood was more convincing, and that wasn't great), the disconnect between script and effects that SDGlyph mentions above, and the complete absence of any real threat of danger. If Stuart is right and this is actually the template for "the Moffat era" then I don't think I'm going to enjoy it all that much. Having said that, I'm hoping this is a weak episode and that we'll be back on track next week. More than anything this episode reminds me of how I felt while watching Gridlocked.
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"with Rory being a sort of substitute for the Doctor who didn't quite rise to the challenge and became the literal opposite, a nurse." In what way is a nurse the "literal opposite" of a doctor?
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Like the new look. Classy.
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I bought the writer's tale on the strength of your excellent review for that and this review is just as good.
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Great review, Neil.
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"In The Waters Of Mars the corridors are very, very long." True. And slightly annoying. Having correctly pointed out that weight is at a premium when sending stuff to Mars, why the hell would they construct such massive, empty corridors? Great review, Frank, as always. Just out of interest, what did you make of the music? I found it massively overblown for large swathes of it. It was also good to see the Doctor employ his massive heroic backlighting, last seen in Pompei. (Triggered by dicking around with fixed points in time and space, perhaps?) Finally, in the commentary track for Forrest of the Dead RTD discussed the fact that allowing the Doctor to remote control the TARDIS would destroy all sense of drama. I agreed with him then, and still feel that way about the Gadget Tardis cop out.
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Looking on the bright side with the budget, at least we probably won't see any more mass hypnotised crowds. They're more than a little bit played out. I really liked "the mass Judoon argument about signage when releasing their imprisoned Captain". The CGI looked horribly fake in HD.
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"And even when it gets silly, it's so audaciously, brilliantly stupid - instead of merely pretentiously whimsical - that you can't help but love it. :D" I know what you mean. It's a very fine line between good silly and bad silly, but so far Children of Earth is just about on the right side.
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"It's the little touches that impress in Torchwood." Couldn't agree more. One of my favourite little moments was Frobisher's reaction to Jack's phone conversation with Lois. Loved the incredulous, "He told you that over the phone?" Very nicely played. Still huge amounts of silliness, though. The people doing the perimeter security for that army base are clearly the same firm that did Unit's black archive in the SJA.
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"Davies also mirrors Gwen's induction into Torchwood with her taking on the role of recruitment officer to the by now curious Rupesh Patanjali." Initially misread this as "the now bi curious Rupesh". Well, he was trying to infiltrate Torchwood, after all. I really enjoyed Ianto's "coming out" to his sister. Mainly because I've been in very similar situations myself, and it felt real. "And if they know Jack is immortal then what plans do they have for him because it seems another agenda, primarily of agent Johnson (a suitably severe Liz May Brice), is also being played out with the destruction of the Hub being part of it." I just assumed the plan was to wipe out all of Torchwood in one go. Your idea of another agenda is more interesting, hope that's how it pans out. Also have to agree that a number of the child extras were rubbish.
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