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Wow, this is exactly the same as my map on 270 to Win.
Toggle Commented Oct 15, 2016 on From pan to fire at The Carpentariat
Mr. Bartlett also posted a link to his research for the article on Facebook. Whatever you think of his op-ed, the information here is quite interesting: http://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=2604679
I spent 2012 dealing with a number of fakes on Twitter. I've also been fascinated by con artistry for a long time. This is a great post, but I have to lay out some important things you might not understand in reaching your conclusion. 1) It is perfectly possible to fall in love with someone you've never met. In fact, this predates the internet. There were entire relationships conducted by telegraph in the 19th Century. Given that con artists can manage to convince seemingly-rational people that they are foreign princes trying to launder their family fortunes in the US, a cyber-romance with a fake girlfriend is not a big reach. You don't have to be gullible or stupid, you just have to want something they offer. Manti didn't have a lot of opportunity to meet Pacific Islander chicks in South Bend, so he was probably only too happy to meet one online. 2) There is social shame in admitting to a relationship that never takes place in person. I dealt directly with this issue last year when a friend's cyber-girlfriend of two years turned on him and accused him of abuse. It took all of his courage to defang her attacks by admitting they had never actually met. Con artists rely on the shame of the victim to enforce their silence -- grandma won't call the cops because she doesn't want to admit she got played. Many victims will even defend their victimizer rather than admit to being victims. Ask any law enforcement person who deals with scams and fraud. 3) Related to the last point, the highest art of the confidence trickster is getting you to take part in the illusion. The psychology is not dissimilar to Stockholm Syndrome. Basically, if you want something to be real you will see it, regardless of evidence or the lack thereof. You will even invent details to make it seem more real. This is still an act of deception, but it is primarily SELF-deception that deceives others secondarily to one's self. 4) The guy who carried out this scheme had help from friends. One of them is almost certainly female. If Manti had set out to have a fake girlfriend, there would be no conspiracy at all -- just him with his own lies. If Manti had been conscious of the confidence scheme when she "died," he almost certainly would not have made a big deal out of it. Think about it: would you want to distract yourself right before a big game and spend the time worried how long the ruse will last? I wouldn't, and Manti's performance in the Michigan game suggests he was actually focused by thinking she had passed away. Bizarrely, this is not uncommon in confidence games. People who really believe that a Nigerian prince is sending them millions will often seem more confident and happy in the time before they understand they've been defrauded. Again, this is a great post. Just bear in mind that many people have been where T'eo is, though few of them have been under such a bright media spotlight.
Haters gonna hate. So long Whitney, we'll miss your voice.
What do you mean by "globalization," Ben? Because when you say that around Glenn Beck he will think you mean commies with entry visas. If you say it around Scott Beason (AL's "empty the clip on illegals" state Senator), he will think you mean brown people (Mexican, Arab, it doesn't matter) and not a Mercedes factory in Tuscaloosa. That's why HB56 has become such a millstone around their necks. You're British, and you live here in the US. That's globalization too. We're using the internet to monitor and react to events around the world -- that's globalization. When Arabs use Twitter and YouTube and Facebook to run a revolution, that's globalization as well. Globalization is a fact, like climate change. We may either make it work for us, or be worked entirely by it, but it is not going to magically disappear without a massive collapse, and I do not want a collapse. Nor should you. There has never been a civilization that collapsed into peace, justice, and prosperity. Civilization in collapse is universally marked by violence and horror. Look at these Arab revolts: they're being driven by climate change. Where we would agree, I suspect, is the idea that globalization ought to be based on human values instead of corporate values. In order to achieve this, however, we will have to operate in the world as it is -- nation-states, internal combustion engines, and all. It's the only way we'll ever get to a solar-and-wind powered world that isn't its own best destruction.
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Greenwald sure seems to hate the rule of law. Remember, the president is operating under the AUMF of 2001, which mandates a state of war with AQ. That's "war," not "criminal complaint." Anwar al-Awlaki earned his death the same way every Confederate at Shiloh earned theirs. He took up arms against his country, and his country killed him. Why are we surprised? How was this outcome ever in doubt? Better yet, why does Greenwald wish to create doubt where none would otherwise exist? This shows up in his phrasing: "targeted killing" is a nonsense term. It invokes a reaction in the clueless reader, but all it amounts to is "ready, aim, fire." To this day there are Southerners who say that Lincoln "assassinated" hundreds of thousands of Confederate soldiers. I suppose that if we sent Greenwald back to 1863, he would agree. He might even run around the field in front of Pickett's charge moaning about habeas requests and demanding full jury trials before anyone was killed. Or maybe not, if George Bush was in charge of the Union Army. See, Greenwald had no problem with the invasion and occupation of Iraq. Over one hundred thousand Iraqis lost their lives before he changed his mind; overcompensating now, he makes no room for the president to fulfill the terms of the 2001 AUMF and exercise his Constitutional role as commander-in-chief. Note that when I joined the Army, I took an oath to protect and defend the Constitution of the United States against ALL enemies, foreign and domestic. That includes someone like Awlaki who takes up arms against the US from a "lawless tribal zone" somewhere. He earned his death, and no amount of Greenwaldian histrionics will change that.
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Gingrich is like a cockroach. He never actually dies, but comes back even more disgusting and awful than before.
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According to the instant polling, Sullivan is just about the only person who didn't like his speech.
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Fake conservatives want to overturn Roe v Wade, REAL conservatives want to undo Griswold v Connecticut.
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North Korea is Zimbabwe with uranium.
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That Paul is the intellectual in his field does not make him a genius. It's a bit like being the smartest kid in the Special Ed class.
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The great white hope! Let's have another Florida 2000, that was so much fun. Not.
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Actually, one of the defining characteristics of warfare is that it usually begins over resource access and almost always ends without actually improving said access. The most common cause of war in Africa is food insecurity, but almost all those wars produce famines. As for the situation with Iran: we have to remember that (1) the regime is an independent actor (2) said regime has slipped from the grasp of the clerics into the hands of the Pasdaran. Iran's new military dictatorship doesn't need help ratcheting tensions. They have no check on their ambitions, and we're seeing a shift from proxy conflicts (Hamas, Hezbollah, etc) to direct action (using EW to take down an American drone). War may happen without anyone's invitation.
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We'll see a lot more of these "hunger crimes" soon enough. Things are getting worse out here in the hinterlands.
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I have to say I'm disappointed to see Cain implode. A Cain-Obama race would have had the same effect as the Keyes-Obama race, i.e. race would not be a factor in the race. And we remember how that turned out for Keyes, right?
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One account has him getting blown up in a convoy, which means the blood around his face isn't from a beating but massive overpressure. According to another report, he'd been wounded in the legs while fleeing and bled to death being evacuated to Misrata. Either way is good enough and he can burn in Hell with George Wallace and Richard Nixon now.
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To be completely fair, the NYPD was always this awful.
Tell you what, Jane -- keep on pretending you're relevant, much less a "gatekeeper" for the movement. It's hilarious.
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What we've got to understand here is that evangelicals made a conscious decision to turn Islam into the new communism. Islamophobia is the same old bugaboo nonsense and Steve King is Joe McCarthy.
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On #15: did you notice the CNN Tea Party debate intro was just like a reality show? They don't have contenders. They have contestants.
I'll join the call against geoengineering for now. Unless/until we cannot resolve the crisis any other way, radical interventions in planetary ecology should remain science fiction and science study. But one thought: does the "exercise" analogy mean the human race must be forced to don spandex and play "Sweatin' To The Oldies"? Because I have a recurring nightmare just like that in which Richard Simmons has become the global dictator, Nicolae Carpathia-style, and declared everyone must Deal-A-Meal from henceforth. If we're going to have a soundtrack for the climate war (and what war DOESN'T have its musical contribution to culture?), then I insist on having the chance to pick out at least SOME of the songs. They can't all feature tenor voices and sandals and native flutes, and they can't all be aimed at the same demographic that spawned tea parties either. If at least one isn't as industrial and metal as the climate challenge itself, I might go fucking nuts and start shoving veal patties in my mouth.
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I would separate "defense" from "security" here. In fact, I'd say the old acronym "MIC" has developed an S-shaped tumor -- "MISC" being the Military Industrial Security Complex -- and that the S cancer is a fast-growing malignancy eating the heart out of the M, I, and C. Think of how many Bearcats could have been protecting soldiers from IEDs, for instance.
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Chomsky doesn't talk here about the British elites playing communities against each other for centuries -- the root of the Irish troubles. That same formula was used by southern elites to play poor whites against blacks after Reconstruction. And Chomsky doesn't examine how Arab dictators have remained in power for decades by stoking nationalism, anti-Americanism, and anti-Zionism. He does that elsewhere, but not here. I like Chomsky, but my critique of his historical narrative is that he regards all conflicts as manufactured by American policy. They are not. Indeed, American policy-makers just as often find conflicts already in place. What we do about them is a different matter from whether they exist in the first place.
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As I read this, Syrians are taking to the streets and the Syrian Army has mobilized against the capitol. Another oppressed Arab people wants to write its own epic of liberation, and Obama stands on their side. That's good. We want to see Arabs liberating themselves, and we want to be on their side when they do.
Toggle Commented Aug 27, 2011 on The Obama Doctrine at TheDailyBanter.com
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Greenwald is in the bargaining stage of grief. It's amazing that people who talk of democratic revolution are the last ones to admit that is "what has happened" in Libya. Invoking the heady embedded journalism of Baghdad 2003 makes as much sense as talking about Mossadeq in 1953. Libya is not Iraq is not Iran. The weapons bit is a trap. If the US had been unwilling to sell arms to the "rehabilitated" dictator, people would be complaining at the unfairness. You know it's true.
Toggle Commented Aug 26, 2011 on Not So Quick on Libya at TheDailyBanter.com
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