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Sara
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Things have sure changed since 1960. When the movie "Exodus" first came out, our entire junior high and high school was bussed to Pittsburgh, about 70 miles from our town, to see the movie. I guess the school paid for it as we were never asked for any money for the tickets or the bus trip. It was a Saturday showing and when we got back to school on Monday and for several days after, every class covered what we learned from the movie and the historical context of the content of the movie. We spent several days of history class talking about the creation of a Jewish state and how important this was to the world. It was all taught in a very positive light. My German teacher spent a particularly long time teaching on this subject and it was quite informative as he was with the liberating army for one of the death camps and hearing his first hand accounts was chilling. Also, I had two friends whose parents were arrested by the Nazi SS, one set in Belgium in an Anne Frank kind of existence and the other set arrived at Auchwitz about 2 weeks before the liberation and my friend was born the day after her parents were liberated. One of the Dads came in and gave a talk to our whole school assembly and I don't think there was a dry eye when he got through and for many of us, it changed us in ways we didn't even know until much older and more mature. I can't imagine a school being allowed to do such things today and it is really a shame.
Toggle Commented Dec 27, 2009 on Saturday Night Cinema Exodus at Atlas Shrugs
I was married by a Navy Chaplain. We had to go for 3 counseling sessions before we got approval to marry at the 32nd Street Naval Base small chapel in San Diego. It was war time and the military was very protective of service members and made sure they weren't being taken advantage of by unscrupulous women. The Chaplain was a wonderful, caring man who had a tremendous impact on me and on my future husband. I knew nothing about the military back then and he was so kind and so informative. He not only laid out what he thought I would be going thru as a wife of a man expected to be away from home on long deployments, but he counseled my future husband on what he should do to include me in his military life and ways to make it easier on both of us. Some of his suggestions we put into place and have passed on to the newer generations of wives and warriors. John McCain was awarded the Legion of Merit for his role as acting Chaplain and spiritual leader during his 5 1/2 years as a POW. Read the citation available in his service records available online.
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Whew, I guess if you are a woman and don't have great legs, forget joining the Ukranian military. Could the skirts get any more mini?
Toggle Commented Mar 10, 2008 on Ukraninan military assets at BlackFive
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Also, it should be noted that Mormons also believe that it is still up to the individual in the afterlife to accept or reject the baptism.
Toggle Commented Nov 29, 2007 on Mormons are weird. Compared to who? at BlackFive
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Stefan: The primary reason the LDS church has developed the greatest collection of genealogical material in the world is because of their belief in the ancient ritual of Baptism for the Dead. However, it has nothing to do with becoming a Mormon in the afterlife. Like many Mormon practices, they went back to the earliest Christian and Old Testament teachings and practices, bypassing the centuries of organized religions in between. A Wiki entry explains it this way: Some scholars suggest that baptism for the dead was practiced by some early Christian groups, continuing until at least the late fourth century. John A. Tvedtnes, a Hebrew and early Christian scholar at Brigham Young University, Utah writes: “ That baptism for the dead was indeed practiced in some orthodox Christian circles is indicated by the decisions of two late fourth century councils. The fourth canon of the Synod of Hippo, held in 393, declares, "The Eucharist shall not be given to dead bodies, nor baptism conferred upon them." The ruling was confirmed four years later in the sixth canon of the Third Council of Carthage.[2] ” Some argue that the fact that these two councils felt it necessary to explicitly forbid baptism for the dead shows that there must have been a significant group of people practicing some form of it, accompanied by opposition to it by the church's leadership. Others disagree with the classification of such groups as "orthodox", since the councils concluded that they were in fact unorthodox, at least with respect to that practice. John Chrysostom linked this practice with the Marcionites, who were considered unorthodox for this and other reasons.[citation needed] According to the International Standard Bible Encyclopedia, "Tertullian believed that Paul referred to a custom of vicarious baptism (Res., 48c; Adv. Marc., 5.10). There is evidence that the early church knew such a practice. Epiphanius mentions a tradition that the custom obtained among the Cerinthians (Haer., 28 6). And Chrysostom states that it prevailed among the Marcionites." The "early church" refers to the church shortly after the time of the apostles. Paul said in 1 Corinthians 15:29 "Else what shall they do which are baptized for the dead, if the dead rise not at all, why are they then baptized for the dead?" Latter Day Saints believe this statement is an acknowledgment by Paul that baptism for the dead was both practiced and accepted. The International Standard Bible Encyclopedia says that "commentators have offered between thirty and forty other interpretations, more or less strained, of the passage." Most of these other interpretations center around the notion that either Paul was merely trying to point out contradiction within practices unique to the Corinthians or that the wording describes something other than actual physical baptism. John Chrysostom suggests (in his 40th homily on I Corinthians) that this verse refers to the new believer's professed faith in the resurrection of the dead.
Toggle Commented Nov 29, 2007 on Mormons are weird. Compared to who? at BlackFive
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Uncle J, you are the best in my book. I just wish that during the Vietnam years and thruout my husband's long Navy career, we had had places like Blackfive. It would have made those times so much easier.
Toggle Commented Nov 28, 2007 on Mormons are weird. Compared to who? at BlackFive
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I hope you didn't think my tone was anything but questioning, as I didn't mean it any other way. I think there is much confusion about the Book of Mormon. I've seen many places around the Net that say Mormons put it ahead of the Bible, which is not true. The big difference, as I see it, is that Mormons do not believe God stopped talking to us through revelation and prophecy with the canonization of the Books of the Bible as most Christians know it, that was done in the late 300s AD. They believe the Book of Mormon is another testimony, not superior or superceding, just another. I'm no expert, but I don't believe the Greek Orthodox accept the New Testament canon as we know it today. I don't recall them being called a cult for including other books or testaments that were left out of the Roman Orthodox canon we know as the New Testament in our King James Versions. I was raised a Presbyterian, but I sent my son to the local LDS church, mainly because of their great youth programs and because my husband was deployed for long periods of time and he (son) got excellent male role models there. When my husband was gone, the Elders would make sure my grass was always cut, my plumbing and car breakdowns got fixed, and my son had someone to take him to father/son Scouting events. They also made sure they were there to root for his Pop Warner and H.S. football teams. My husband liked our local Ward because the Bishop (citizen clergy) was also a Navy Admiral. I also have a soft spot because during one of my husband's deployments I broke my leg and could not drive because of a full leg cast. The church arranged for someone to drive me to work every day and home again at night and the ladies brought full course meals for dinner each night. No one ever tried to convert me or my husband during all that time. Mormons, in my opinion, are very very good people.
Toggle Commented Nov 28, 2007 on Mormons are weird. Compared to who? at BlackFive
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But as someone without a God in this fight, Mitt's God isn't really any stranger than Jesus, or Mohammed, or Brahma, simply more recently canonized. I do not understand this statement of yours. Mormons worship the God of Abraham, exactly the same God as Jews and Christians. They hold Jesus as the Son of God, who died for our sins, in the exact same way as Christians. Mormons believe in both the Old and New Testaments of the Bible. They believe in the Father, Son and Holy Ghost. When they pray the pray to God the Father and end their prayers with "in Jesus name." Anyone who really wants to know the true faith of the LDS church only need to read the Articles of Faith which start right off the bat with: #1 We believe in God, the Eternal Father, and in His Son, Jesus Christ, and in the Holy Ghost. #2 We believe that men will be punished for their own sins, and not for Adam's transgression. #3 We believe that through the Atonement of Christ, all mankind may be saved, by obedience to the laws and ordinances of the Gospel. #4 We believe that the first principles and ordinances of the Gospel are: first, Faith in the Lord Jesus Christ; second, Repentance; third, Baptism by immersion for the remission of sins; fourth, Laying on of hands for the gift of the Holy Ghost. What is "recently cannonized" about those beliefs?
Toggle Commented Nov 28, 2007 on Mormons are weird. Compared to who? at BlackFive
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Maybe it is really the smart people who know that "a bird in the hand is worth two in the bush."
Toggle Commented Sep 24, 2007 on Balderdash at Free the Animal
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I should have also noted that it had the tightest security of any base I've ever been on in our 26 years of active duty status.
Toggle Commented Aug 31, 2007 on Goose Creek- Bombers or Maroons? at BlackFive
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Naval Weapons Station, Goose Creek, is not just the home to a brig, it is a weapons storage facility of mammoth proportions, including nukes. A bomb placed at just the right place would blow up the place all the way to Alaska. My husband was stationed there three years and they don't take too kindly to civilians of any kind, and especially those with bomb making equipment.
Toggle Commented Aug 31, 2007 on Goose Creek- Bombers or Maroons? at BlackFive
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