This is PederJakobsen's Typepad Profile.
Join Typepad and start following PederJakobsen's activity
Join Now!
Already a member? Sign In
PederJakobsen
Recent Activity
@Bob, agree 100%. The wall version of what's happening in the Mediterranean is coming soon. Strap your children onto a drone that you purchased a Future Shop, and hop over the wall to Canada. What's happening in Europe is truly a horrific tragedy, but who is to say that equal risks will not be taken by Americans if they run out of water in the next 30-40 years (which they will). You'll need some crazy wall to keep thirsty people away from our pristine lakes.
1 reply
I don't see a problem with this idea. People like walls. It's been great for Chinese tourism. Pink Floyd's "The Wall" remains one of the biggest selling albums of all time. Walls are clearly good business.
1 reply
@Jeff, so what's the theory say about how to use wages to reduce this "slack"? It must be different for those who do menial work at $15 / hr vs. managers who earn $60 / hr. ...? Lastly, if the wage difference between a medium level manager and a higher level manager is relatively smaller, wouldn't there be less incentive for someone to take on the greater responsibility and stress, and thus remain simply content to stay where they are on the "corporate ladder", regardless of talent. It could make the ambitious yet rational person less productive, and thus hurt the company as a whole. So this is also the sort of "slack" you are referring to, correct?
1 reply
Having been involved in small business, it's a common complaint among proprietors that paying people more seems to have no effect on their performance or job satisfaction. I'm curious if this has been studied, given that small business is the supposed backbone of the Canadian economy. I guess what I'm saying is that once someone is spaced out or unmotivated by nature, raising their wage by 5 or 10 bucks ain't gonna do a dang thing. I also wonder about this: If you live in a country with even mild egalitarian wage controls among management in, say, the EU, where borders are open, would it not create a strong incentive for those who are ambitions to move next door where there are no such controls? I understand this is how Germany gets much of it's talent from other European countries, and that the damage caused by this outmigration of talent is suspected to be seriously damaging to small nations like Denmark and Holland. I'm sure you economist have a word for this, and I'd love to know what it is so I can Google it. Thank you.
1 reply
Nick Rowe, you instincts are correct, twitter's not cool with the kids, and much less Facebook. It's all about Instagram these days. ;)
1 reply
I just did a quick check on @pmharper. 7% of his followers are "fake", and 63 are "inactive", meaning that are totally disengaged from anything comes down the pipe, and probably have been for years. twitter followers is highly suspect data, as is social media data in general. Yes, you can do some powerful analytics with twitter, but followers ain't it. Generally, I suspect that social media analytics is a black art that only practitioners who do it full time really understand. Lost of smoke and mirrors IMO.
1 reply
Here we have a potential productivity related problem where you can actually collect some real and accurate data easily and on the cheap. You will buy, say, 5 USB Thermometer/Hygrometer units at $20 a piece at amazon.ca They will sit in various offices of colleagues, and collect data, which will be automatically sent to a central database. This technology is cheap, and common place, because rooms where servers are kept must be at a constant temperature to ensure optimal performance, and these USB units are often used for that. Combine this with outside temperatures, plus readings from the central HVAC system, plus small program on the desktop that occasionally pops up and asks, "How do you feel", and perhaps that all ads up to some good data. A nice project for a student who enjoys data wrangling and knows a bit of coding perhaps? But, what is the economics angle here? Good data, no model, no fun. Any ideas...?
1 reply
Sorry, the above was meant for you Antonio Cabraels. And just like the printed page, it appears that once you "post" on this blog, you cannot edit your words. Digital technology 0, printing press 0. Next round please. On another note, I have been able to find a free and illegal PDF copy of almost every textbook for economics that have come across at the Carleton bookstore. So, the questions is, if an undergraduate economics student truly has good instincts for economics, would they ever actually buy a text book? ;)
1 reply
Hey, Chris J., I just signed up for http://www.core-econ.org It looks great. You may be interested to know that in 1997/1998 (I think) Carleton University built an online economics course, complete with interactive Javascript and Flash graphics where you could play with simple models by changing parameters in real time in your web browser. It was a collaboration between comp sci and economics departments. Groundbreaking work at that time, I would think, given that Flash was in its infancy. I was selected as the summer intern to help with the content, and it kickstarted a long career in hi-tech as a software developer. Thanks Carleton! :)
1 reply
PederJakobsen is now following The Typepad Team
Aug 6, 2015