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Helen De Cruz
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This is the twenty-first installment of The Cocoon Goes Global, a series that gives a sense of what the philosophy profession looks like outside of the Anglophone West. After a brief hiatus, we are very pleased to start this series again and we hope to basically keep going. If you... Continue reading
Posted 6 days ago at The Philosophers' Cocoon
This is a second installment of a series of guest posts on philosophers who write poetry and/or fiction. This is a guest post by. J. Edward Hackett 1. The Compatible Function of Fiction Writing and Some Philosophical Traditions Helen De Cruz asked me this question: what do I as a... Continue reading
Posted Feb 23, 2021 at The Philosophers' Cocoon
I started the blog Doing Things With Philosophy about 4 years ago to give philosophy graduates a sense of potential careers outside of academia. It has brief interviews with philosophers who have a variety of professions. Especially close to my heart is this one with Josh Parsons -- formerly a... Continue reading
Posted Feb 19, 2021 at The Philosophers' Cocoon
The Cocoon will be hosting a series of guest posts by philosophers who write fiction or poetry. The aim of this series of guest posts will be to explore how we can express philosophical ideas in formats that go beyond the standard academic article or monograph. By looking at the... Continue reading
Posted Feb 17, 2021 at The Philosophers' Cocoon
This is a guest post by Finnur Dellsén, Associate Professor at the University of Iceland As many people have pointed out recently, the peer review system relies on us accepting several referee requests for each paper we publish. So refereeing is a substantial part of our job as researchers, even... Continue reading
Posted Feb 16, 2021 at The Philosophers' Cocoon
Michel, this is all excellent advice. I think this works very well and I have the same method. I set aside a few achievable goals every day, alongside the urgent stuff. My teaching load is very low (only 3 courses/year) but if I am not careful I will let lots of other things take over, e.g., grad advising, journal editing, refereeing, grant writing, etc etc. So I set aside most days especially non-teaching days dedicated time to work at an achievable research goal.
I was intrigued to read Perry Hendricks' advice for grad students on how to write papers for publication. It is practical, no-nonsense, and contains a lot of valuable insights. But as all writing guides, it can only cover so much and doesn't go into some of the aspects of the... Continue reading
Posted Jan 21, 2021 at The Philosophers' Cocoon
Eric Schwitzgebel, Johan De Smedt and I are launching our book "Philosophy Through Science Fiction Stories: Exploring the Boundaries of the Possible", which will be published with Bloomsbury. The book launch will take place on Zoom on January 18, from 2 PM to 3:30 Central Time. This launch will feature... Continue reading
Posted Jan 11, 2021 at The Philosophers' Cocoon
This year, I have reviewed 12 papers (and more if you include revise and resubmits) for various journals. As I was reflecting on my work as a reviewer (for my end-of-year report of teaching, service, and research), I saw this interesting question on Twitter. Gui Sanches de Oliveira asked: Is... Continue reading
Posted Dec 22, 2020 at The Philosophers' Cocoon
I've been learning how to write fiction. It's been a slow process, going on for about three years now, and after many rejections and writing about 15 stories (far more if you count all the unfinished ones) I got my first short story published published in a magazine here. It... Continue reading
Posted Dec 5, 2020 at The Philosophers' Cocoon
This is a guest post by Graham Oppy, Monash University, for our unusual teaching ideas series. In Australia—as in many other parts of the world—we have been through more or less an entire academic year of teaching entirely via Zoom. It is likely that, in 2021, we shall continue to... Continue reading
Posted Dec 2, 2020 at The Philosophers' Cocoon
I was inspired by Marcus Arvan's earlier call for strategies on how to deal with pandemic job market collapse, and I want to make some remarks on that from my perspective as placement director. Currently, I am the placement director at SLU, though all my remarks in this rather lengthy... Continue reading
Posted Nov 25, 2020 at The Philosophers' Cocoon
This is a guest post by C. Thi Nguyen, philosophy professor at the University of Utah OK, I just survived being Program Chair of the American Society for Aesthetics Annual Conference - a huge, 4-track, 3-day conference that had to go virtual. I didn’t know it was going virtual when... Continue reading
Posted Nov 23, 2020 at The Philosophers' Cocoon
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I don't know how and when the pandemic will end, but we can be reasonably confident it will end. And in this not-too-distant future, we can ask: how will we do conferencing and seminars post-pandemic? Our present way of doing things (well, pre-2020) burns a lot of fossil fuels. An... Continue reading
Posted Nov 1, 2020 at The Philosophers' Cocoon
This is the third installment of our series on publishing popular philosophy books, written by Tamler Sommers, University of Houston. Helen De Cruz invited me to write a post on writing for non-academic audiences in connection to my 2018 book Why Honor Matters – to give advice to early career... Continue reading
Posted Oct 26, 2020 at The Philosophers' Cocoon
Today, I was watching Neil Gaiman's fiction writing master class, where Gaiman offers advice for how to edit your fiction. A lot of this could just as well apply to non-fiction writing. For example, Gaiman says that your first draft is for your eyes only. If you didn't leave it... Continue reading
Posted Oct 5, 2020 at The Philosophers' Cocoon
I'm teaching a graduate course Fiction Writing for Philosophers (syllabus here, some videos on how to write fiction I made here, writing dialogue, idea, plot, governing idea, character, point of view, emotion and scene building). I designed this course to help philosophy grad students to understand that philosophy can be... Continue reading
Posted Sep 12, 2020 at The Philosophers' Cocoon
This is a guest post by Samuel C. Rickless, University of California, San Diego, part of our series on unusual teaching ideas. I am happy to have been invited to share my experience of teaching a meaning of life course at UC San Diego. Until 2019, no course at UCSD... Continue reading
Posted Sep 7, 2020 at The Philosophers' Cocoon
In academia, it's very common to think that you could have done more: work more efficiently, work better. This perpetual guilt plagues all of us, particularly those of us on the job market, but even people with tenured positions (which Covid-19 has also made less secure). Closely related to this... Continue reading
Posted Aug 26, 2020 at The Philosophers' Cocoon
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(This is a talk I am giving to the incoming graduate students at my department). Welcome, incoming graduate students; I am so pleased you are joining us. I'm excited to see what lies ahead for you. I'm your placement director, and was asked to give a brief talk to you... Continue reading
Posted Aug 12, 2020 at The Philosophers' Cocoon
This is the second installment of our series on publishing popular philosophy books. This is a guest post by Kevin Zollman, at Carnegie Mellon University, c0-author (with Paul Raeburn) of The Game Theorist's Guide to Parenting: How the Science of Strategic Thinking Can Help You Deal with the Toughest Negotiators... Continue reading
Posted Jul 28, 2020 at The Philosophers' Cocoon
Have you had an obsession, or a more enduring love for a philosopher that you only know through their work? Have you felt a sense of friendship, or at any rate, a sense of fellow-feeling with philosophers in the past? I asked philosophy twitter this question, and received a range... Continue reading
Posted Jul 23, 2020 at The Philosophers' Cocoon
Guest post by Liz Jackson, Ryerson University, reprinted from her personal website. I graduated from Notre Dame in 5 years. I finished my dissertation in my 4th year, and had 4/5 dissertation chapters published by the time I defended (Nov. of my 5th year). My 5th year, my first year... Continue reading
Posted Jul 20, 2020 at The Philosophers' Cocoon
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This is the fourth installment of our series on how to counter racism in philosophy, and as philosophers. This entry is written by Johnathan Flowers, Visiting Assistant Professor of Philosophy, Worcester State University, Worcester, Massachusetts I honestly don’t know. I don’t know how we would begin to support Black Philosophers... Continue reading
Posted Jun 9, 2020 at The Philosophers' Cocoon
This is the twentieth installment of The Cocoon Goes Global, a series that gives a sense of what the philosophy profession looks like outside of the Anglophone West. This guest post is written by Ljiljana Radenovic, who is Associate Professor at the Department of Philosophy, University of Belgrade. Her main... Continue reading
Posted Jun 8, 2020 at The Philosophers' Cocoon