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Helen De Cruz
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The APA Non-Academic Careers Committee is seeking input and feedback on how it can better serve philosophers in and out of the profession. To this end, the Committee has created a survey: https://delaware.ca1.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_3JCIC4U196id4ma While the Committee is particularly interested in hearing from philosophers who have left academia or are considering... Continue reading
Posted 4 days ago at The Philosophers' Cocoon
I am grateful to the APA for their decision to implement (at least as a test) the proposal that Philosophers for Sustainability launched to have one of the divisional conferences go virtual. They agreed to implement our proposal starting 2025. I think this is a step in the right direction.... Continue reading
Posted Aug 4, 2022 at The Philosophers' Cocoon
Your manuscript (book chapter, paper etc) needs a first reader (also known as "alpha reader" in literature critique) to spot obvious problems before it goes out for review. We know that many great papers need multiple tries at journals before they land. I read a lot of referee reports in... Continue reading
Posted Jul 25, 2022 at The Philosophers' Cocoon
We recently had a request from a philosopher who has ADHD for any tips, resources, etc. How can you flourish as a grad student, undergrad, or faculty member with ADHD in philosophy? If you can talk about personal experience and what helps you, or otherwise know of resources, this would... Continue reading
Posted Jun 30, 2022 at The Philosophers' Cocoon
This is an expanded version of a thread I did recently on self-promotion. Many academics find the concept of self-promotion on social media somewhat icky, but it is often necessary, especially for junior academics. I find self-promotion by others very useful because it gives me the opportunity to learn new... Continue reading
Posted Jun 27, 2022 at The Philosophers' Cocoon
This June I went to my first in-person conference in over two years. It was in UMSL, which is in the town I'm currently based in (St Louis), so it was an easy transition. And it was lovely--exhausting but lovely. I also have a couple of more events lined up... Continue reading
Posted Jun 24, 2022 at The Philosophers' Cocoon
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Some recent takes on the Enlightenment resonated strongly with the broad public. This includes Steven Pinker's Enlightenment Now: The Case for Reason, Science, Humanism, and Progress (2018), and David Graeber and David Wengrow's The Dawn of Everything: A New History of Humanity (2021). I'm not going to write a detailed... Continue reading
Posted May 6, 2022 at The Philosophers' Cocoon
Philosophy is gamified. We jump through hoops to try to get published in the "right" journals, and we do it willingly. We almost all do it, even those very lucky few of us who have earned tenure. Perhaps we do it because this is genuinely the work we wish to... Continue reading
Posted Apr 7, 2022 at The Philosophers' Cocoon
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This is a guest post by True Gibson, PhD student in Logic and Philosophy of Science at UC Irvine This post is part of an ongoing series in the US on unusual, tried and tested teaching ideas. If you have an interesting way and unusual activity in the classroom, or... Continue reading
Posted Mar 15, 2022 at The Philosophers' Cocoon
This is a guest post by Robert Eli Sanchez, Jr. Associate Professor of Philosophy at Occidental College: We would like to officially announce the launch of the Journal of Mexican Philosophy (JMxP), a peer reviewed journal that aims to make Mexican philosophy available and attractive to an international community of... Continue reading
Posted Mar 11, 2022 at The Philosophers' Cocoon
A commonly heard complaint about virtual conferences and other scholarly gatherings is that the network aspect is missing. When we gather in person, there are many opportunities to informally connect to others. In particular, for junior scholars, attending an in-person conference affords possibilities of fostering professional relationships outside of our... Continue reading
Posted Feb 22, 2022 at The Philosophers' Cocoon
I am an associate editor for Ergo, and I was idly wondering last night what would happen once I reach Reviewer Z. The situation is this: A minimum of two referee reports are needed for each paper that is sent out for review. Each referee is assigned a letter, and... Continue reading
Posted Feb 17, 2022 at The Philosophers' Cocoon
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In this post, I discuss practical ways to teach Less Commonly Taught (LCT) philosophical traditions in your regular philosophy course. This may include such courses as Introduction to Philosophy, Ethics, History of Philosophy, Philosophy of Religion, or Philosophy of Mind. We commonly teach such courses still with a heavy emphasis... Continue reading
Posted Feb 12, 2022 at The Philosophers' Cocoon
This is a guest blog post announcement by Amy Olberding, President's Associates Presidential Professor, University of Oklahoma I’m one of the co-editors on a new series OUP is initiating and wanted to reach out here in particular to make clear that we welcome proposal submissions from younger, less established philosophers.... Continue reading
Posted Jan 18, 2022 at The Philosophers' Cocoon
You are a professor at a small liberal arts college. A bright student approaches you and says she is considering graduate school in philosophy. She loves philosophy and wants to dive deeper into it. She foresees a life of the mind where she might do this for a living. Oh,... Continue reading
Posted Jan 13, 2022 at The Philosophers' Cocoon
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This is a guest post by Erich Hatala Matthes, Associate Professor of Philosophy and Faculty Director of the Frost Center for the Environment at Wellesley College. His first book, Drawing the Line: What to Do with the Work of Immoral Artists from Museums to the Movies is now out with... Continue reading
Posted Dec 29, 2021 at The Philosophers' Cocoon
Today, as I contemplate 2.5 years not having seen my parents in person, I got thinking about mobility as an essential aspect of the academic job market. We take it for granted that if you want to succeed in academia, you must be willing to move to a wide range... Continue reading
Posted Dec 21, 2021 at The Philosophers' Cocoon
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This tweet was meant satirically, but taken in earnest by many people: (I don't know how to do alt text here so I'll just also type out what it says: "Grad Students: You NEED to publish. But you NEED to do so in top journals. I routinely see grad CVs... Continue reading
Posted Dec 19, 2021 at The Philosophers' Cocoon
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This is the twenty-ninth installment of The Cocoon Goes Global, a series that gives a sense of what the philosophy profession looks like outside of the Anglophone West. This guest post is written by Chiara Russo Krauss, associate professor at Federico II University in Naples General Information Italy is a... Continue reading
Posted Dec 7, 2021 at The Philosophers' Cocoon
What do we want to achieve when we manage our time better? I do not think that productivity should be the aim per se. Productivity, especially in tenured academics, is overrated, and there is already so much to read. The world isn't worse off if a tenured academic publishes a... Continue reading
Posted Nov 25, 2021 at The Philosophers' Cocoon
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The aim of this blog post and interview is to give readers a primer on how to create the conditions that make you hireable as a philosopher outside of academia. The Cocoon also has other practical advice on alt-ac careers such as how to write a resume and how to... Continue reading
Posted Sep 3, 2021 at The Philosophers' Cocoon
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This is the twenty-seventh installment of The Cocoon Goes Global, a series that gives a sense of what the philosophy profession looks like outside of the Anglophone West. This guest post is written by Melina Duarte (Associate Professor at the Department of Philosophy at UiT The Arctic University of Norway)... Continue reading
Posted Aug 5, 2021 at The Philosophers' Cocoon
This is a guest post by Andrew Moon, Assistant Professor at Virginia Commonwealth University. When philosophers write papers, they also discuss objections to their own arguments. But how much should they do this? A paper could go on forever with discussions of more and more objections, making the paper unhelpfully... Continue reading
Posted Jul 19, 2021 at The Philosophers' Cocoon
This is the twenty-sixth installment of The Cocoon Goes Global, a series that gives a sense of what the philosophy profession looks like outside of the Anglophone West. This guest post is written by Vladimir Krstić, Philosophy Assistant Professor at Nazarbayev University, Nur-Sultan, Kazakhstan. The first thing that comes to... Continue reading
Posted Jul 13, 2021 at The Philosophers' Cocoon
This is the twenty-fifth installment of The Cocoon Goes Global, a series that gives a sense of what the philosophy profession looks like outside of the Anglophone West. This guest post is written by Sofia Jeppsson, associate professor of philosophy at Umeå University (or Ubmeje Universitiähta in the local Sami... Continue reading
Posted Jul 7, 2021 at The Philosophers' Cocoon