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Simona Carini
Northern California
An Italian transplanted in California
Interests: creative cooking, cheese making, bread baking, food writing, blogging, book and box making, kayaking, photography, classical music You can contact me at simosite [AT] mac [DOT] com
Recent Activity
That's nice, Cathy. When fava beans are tender and extra fresh, one easy way to eat them is just out of the pod, with a little bit of salt and some shaved pecorino cheese. Enjoy!
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That is strange, Frank. I wonder why. I am no expert so I don't know how delicate fava beans are or otherwise. I hope you will have a nice surprise still. The season here is not long, but I certainly enjoy it :)
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You're such an amazing gardener, Claudia, I am sure you'll be able to grow nice fava beans. The young leaves are also edible :)
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Thank you, Wendy :)
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Thank you Debra :) I found both the stories and his musings highly interesting and engaging. Thank you for choosing this book.
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In the northern hemisphere winter still rules, but not for long: by the time the 36th edition of the culinary/literary event Novel Food ends, it will be spring! In the meantime, as inclement weather keeps us inside, we have a perfect excuse to curl up in our favorite armchair with a book and a steaming mug of tea. Novel Food is a little voyage of literary discovery and a delightful party featuring literary-inspired dishes contributed by event's participants. I hope you will join. I am looking forward to learning about a published literary work (a novel, novella, short story, memoir, bio,... Continue reading
Posted Jun 4, 2019 at briciole
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satisfying spring flavors (sapori di primavera) (placemat by La FABBRICA del LINO, cheeseboard by BHVwoodworks) Reading Buttermilk Graffiti1 by Edward Lee, the current selection of the Cook the Books club, was a pleasure from the first to the last page. Lee is a great storyteller: he brings the readers with him in his travels, inside every eating establishment he visits, next to every person he talks to. Together with the more factual details of his 16 stories, each centered around a place with specific food traditions, he shares doses of personal opinions, memories, experiences. Each chapter of the book ends with... Continue reading
Posted May 29, 2019 at briciole
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Indeed it was, Wendy. And I am thankful that it inspired me to make this recipe :)
Toggle Commented Apr 9, 2019 on artichoke spread / paté di carciofi at briciole
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Thank you, Debra. They were a great cooking project and a delight to eat :)
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Dear Annette, thank you for stopping by. My blog is very much alive :) I read your question with interest. I grew up in Central Italy and in my family we didn't have a traditional pasta recipe for St. Joseph (though we celebrated the day since my father's name was Giuseppe and in Italy that's also Father's Day. Your question made me curious and I did some research for you. In Sicily there are several traditional dishes tied to St. Joseph, one of which is the pasta dish you asked about. As I don't have a family member to ask for details, I looked on the web and found many recipes, all slightly different as is often the case with traditional dishes. I think this is a good one http://www.palermoatavola.com/wp/?p=1915 but it is in Italian. A good version in English is the one for the Barilla site http://www.academiabarilla.com/italian-recipes/sicilia/pasta-with-sardines.aspx Note that the original recipe uses only pine nuts, which are relatively easy to find in Italy and not as expensive as in the US, while the Barilla recipe uses some pine nuts and some almonds. Also, the wild fennel is not a common ingredient here: if you look at the Tips section in this recipe on the NY Times https://cooking.nytimes.com/recipes/1004-pasta-with-fennel-and-sardines you will find useful suggestions on how to deal with this ingredient and also how to prepare fresh sardines. Note that the NY Times recipe allows the use of canned sardines and uses comparatively more anchovies: personally I would not do either of these things (that is, I would look for fresh sardines and would use less anchovies). Hope this helps.
Toggle Commented Apr 7, 2019 on reginella at briciole
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You are welcome, Cathy. I enjoy hosting the event :)
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You are welcome, Debra. I thoroughly enjoyed The Goldfinch :)
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I enjoyed every stage of the preparation, Cathy, particularly the wrapping part :)
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They definitely have a distinctive flavor, Cathy. I grew up eating them because my mother was a big fan and would make them in different ways, including preserved in oil.
Toggle Commented Apr 1, 2019 on artichoke spread / paté di carciofi at briciole
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I loved it too, Debra. I was a bit concerned about the length, but the writing is so nice and the story intriguing. A winner :)
Toggle Commented Apr 1, 2019 on artichoke spread / paté di carciofi at briciole
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And before you know it, it is time to wrap up the 35th edition of Novel Food, the literary/culinary event that Lisa of Champaign Taste and I created in 2007. Novel Food is about literary works (prose or poetry) that inspire the preparation of dishes. I continue to host this event with great pleasure, as it brings together two of my passions: literature and food. Every edition delivers a great reading list and a lovely set of recipes, and this one is no exception. A group of book-loving food bloggers has contributed posts, each describing a literary work and the dish... Continue reading
Posted Mar 29, 2019 at briciole
thank you, Elizabeth :)
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It was a great project, Claudia: research, shopping, making, I enjoyed every step. And yes, I ended up devouring the book as well :)
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I have not seen the movie, Frank. The novel provided background information on various aspects of Singaporean society which I think made the story more interesting. To be honest, at the beginning I was doubtful, but once I put myself in the perspective of "modern novel of manners set in Singapore" I was able to appreciate the reading. During Rachel's first meal in Singapore there is an explicit reference to Pride & Prejudice (albeit the movie starring Colin Firth, rather than the book). Popiah is a winner: I can't wait to make it again and host a party where guests make their own :)
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creamy distillation of artichokes A recent visit to the local bookstore resulted in the purchase of the novel The Goldfinch by the American author Donna Tartt.1 Published in 2013, The Goldfinch won the 2014 Pulitzer Prize for Fiction, among other honors. Distinctly Dickensian in breadth, The Goldfinch grabbed my attention from the mysterious opening pages, and soon I found myself deeply interested in the adventures of the protagonist, Theo Decker, who reminded me a lot of Pip, the protagonist of Great Expectations by Charles Dickens. The first person point of view works well in the story. The title refers to a... Continue reading
Posted Mar 26, 2019 at briciole
Thank you for contributing, Elizabeth :)
Toggle Commented Mar 24, 2019 on Announcing: Novel Food #35 at briciole
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Thank you so much, Debra :)
Toggle Commented Mar 21, 2019 on Announcing: Novel Food #35 at briciole
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Thank you so much, Deb :)
Toggle Commented Mar 21, 2019 on Announcing: Novel Food #35 at briciole
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I remember making dumplings at LongHouse: it requires attention and practice for sure. I agree with you that even when not perfect in shape they are still good to eat. The dinner you describe sounds incredible. Thank you so much for sharing the story and the recipe and for contributing to Novel Food :)
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composite flavor and texture I read Crazy Rich Asians1 by Kevin Kwan, the current selection of the Cook the Books club, in just a few days. It is a modern version of a Victorian novel set mostly in Asia, particularly the island state of Singapore. When Rachel and Nick, the protagonists, arrive in Singapore, they are greeted by Nick's bet friend, Colin, and his fiancée, Araminta. Together, they go to eat at one of Singapore's hawker centers. I have never been to Singapore, but I learned about hawker centers and the characteristics of Singaporean food thanks to the paper Lucey Bowen... Continue reading
Posted Mar 8, 2019 at briciole
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