This is Simona Carini's Typepad Profile.
Join Typepad and start following Simona Carini's activity
Join Now!
Already a member? Sign In
Simona Carini
Northern California
An Italian transplanted in California
Interests: creative cooking, cheese making, bread baking, food writing, blogging, book and box making, kayaking, photography, classical music You can contact me at simosite [AT] mac [DOT] com
Recent Activity
Thank you for your contribution, Deb :)
Toggle Commented 3 days ago on Announcing Novel Food #37 at briciole
1 reply
I know I am lucky to live in a state where produce abounds, Frank. The farm that grows the cucuzza has some amazing things, including several varieties of fresh beans, different types of radicchio, special tomatoes. If you look at my Instagram feed, you'll see the beans and the tomatoes, plus a gorgeous specimen of zucca Marina di Chioggia.
1 reply
It is, Judee: it offers a historical perspectives on some of the foods available in this country. I often read that a certain food originated elsewhere, but not often do I learn how it got adopted by both farmers and the public at large. Mine also took longer than expected and I almost did not make the deadline for the post. Now they are ripening and I get to eat a couple a day: what a treat :)
1 reply
I hope you find some fresh dates, Wendy, and get to taste them :)
1 reply
Dates from the farmer or at the farm are definitely a treat, Ali. A road trip to California sounds like a nice idea, any time of the year :)
1 reply
The book was so fascinating! I have never had a mangosteen, Deb, so I will look for it the next time I visit Hawaii: of course, after reading Fairchild's opinion, I am curious. And you are welcome :)
1 reply
Thank you, Paz :)
1 reply
Thank you, Claudia :) I was wondering it you could find some fresh dates there. Different varieties have different amount of astringent tannin, which dictates when they can be eaten, similarly to persimmons.
1 reply
Image
fruit fresh from the farmers market makes a great post-run salad (placemat by La FABBRICA del LINO) The story told by Daniel Stone in his book The Food Explorer: The True Adventures of the Globe-Trotting Botanist Who Transformed What America Eats1 is fascinating, at times riveting, and I found myself staying up late some evenings to read what would happen next. Before reading the book, I didn't know who David Fairchild was. Also, I didn't know who Frank Meyer was, though I am a great fan of the Meyer lemon, named after him; had never read the full story behind the... Continue reading
Posted Sep 30, 2019 at briciole
12
Image
flavors of Sicily: cucuzza e tenerumi (placemat by La FABBRICA del LINO) Italian author Andrea Camilleri died on 17 July, 2019, aged 931. The novels he wrote narrating the adventures of detective Salvo Montalbano are one of the main reasons Novel Food came to exist and it is therefore fitting to dedicate to il maestro (the master), as he was respectfully called in Italy, this post. In the archive of briciole there are several posts dedicated to Montalbano and dishes from his (and Camilleri's) native Sicily2. Montalbano likes to eat well, though he is not a cook, so he relies on... Continue reading
Posted Sep 26, 2019 at briciole
Image
In Northern California, where I live, the signs of season's change are clear: the light has become softer, golden; winter squashes and persimmons have appeared at farmers' markets; days are getting shorter more quickly (sigh!). In a few days the fall equinox will make the change official. It is therefore time to launch the 37th edition of the culinary/literary event Novel Food, which is a voyage of literary discovery and a delightful party featuring literary-inspired dishes contributed by event's participants. I hope you will join. I am looking forward to learning about a published literary work (a novel, novella, short story,... Continue reading
Posted Sep 17, 2019 at briciole
I wish I could visit your garden Mary-Anne: zucchetta, heirloom tomatoes, figs, wow! Hanging zucchetta is quite a sight and a cheerful one. Indeed, zucchetta is great in stews as it retains texture. I have also used it in this recipe https://www.northcoastjournal.com/humboldt/zucchini-days-of-summer/Content?oid=14707925 instead of zucchini and it worked well. My favorite way of eating figs is as fresh fruit, with nothing else. Figs on focaccia and also on pizza are great. Your jam sounds wonderful too. Have you tried drying figs? I also have an old recipe that I made with mission figs, but you can try with other varieties of figs and other types of cheese (just make sure that it softens when warmed up): https://www.pulcetta.com/2009/09/fichi-col-formaggio.html
1 reply
Maybe you can suggest to some farmer to grow them, Cathy. They are so good! Hope you'll enjoy the current selection more :)
1 reply
Thank you, Elizabeth :)
1 reply
I hope you can find some torpedo onions in your area, Tina, and taste them. They are indeed pretty and a great addition to salads. I am glad you enjoyed the book :)
1 reply
Thank you Claudia. Summer is indeed salad season and while green beans are plentiful, I make this one often :)
1 reply
You are welcome, Wendy. Glad you enjoyed the book :)
1 reply
Thank you for your encouragement :)
1 reply
Thank you, Tina :) Practice is what works for me, which requires time I not always have.
1 reply
What a nice combination of vegetables and legumes! I must try this when fresh cannellini are available (there is one farmer here who grows them). and nice that Hamilton's words about her mother-in-law reminded you of your grandmother. Thank you for participating in this edition of Cook the Books :)
Thank you, Debra. I am lucky local farmers grow this kind of onion. I hope it grows in popularity so more will do the same.
1 reply
Thank you, Deb. My pleasure :)
1 reply
Thank you, Debra :)
1 reply
We miss you too, Paz. Glad you enjoyed the roundup :)
1 reply
Glad you enjoyed the roundup, Deb :)
1 reply