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Simona Carini
Northern California
An Italian transplanted in California
Interests: creative cooking, cheese making, bread baking, food writing, blogging, book and box making, kayaking, photography, classical music You can contact me at simosite [AT] mac [DOT] com
Recent Activity
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Days are longer and spring is definitely in the air where I live, which means it is time to launch a new edition of the culinary/literary event Novel Food, the 41st! Novel Food is a voyage of literary discovery and a party featuring literary-inspired dishes contributed by event's participants. We are marking the one year anniversary of our lives upended by the pandemic. I don't know for you, but for me reading and cooking have been even more important than usual to keep me focused, grounded, hopeful. I invite you to join the event. I am looking forward to learning about... Continue reading
Posted yesterday at briciole
Thank you, Shaheen. Thank you, Debra. The fields of quinoa are quite a site, when the plants are full grown.
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I was also put off by the swearing and repetition of 'dude' and like you found that the most interesting character of the book is Zarela, whom I remember meeting at LongHouse. I liked learning more about her. Your recipes show how versatile chard is: your grandmother's recipe is an example of a flavorful nourishing dish made with just a handful of ingredients. Well done :)
Thank you, Tina. I hope you give quinoa another try: it is versatile and you can add it to other dishes, besides salad :) I adore persimmons, Deb, and put them in most salads I make when they are in season. I managed to make the last purchase last, but now I must wait until last summer for the new crop. I'll experiment with some other fruit in the meantime. It is always a pleasure to contribute to your event :)
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Thank you, Amy :)
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Welcome, Radha. Romanesco's shape is fascinating and its flavor excellent so it's perfect :)
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E' un po' diversa dal solito e molto buona, Monia :)
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[cliccare il link per andare alla versione in italiano] ingredients ready to be turned into a salad (placemat by La FABBRICA del LINO) Last summer I started taking photos of produce I brought back from the farmers' market. I enjoy letting fresh vegetables take center stage before they are transformed into dishes. Some of you will wonder: What about the quinoa? It comes from a local farm too.1 Lake Llanquihue and Osorno in the background (image taken outside Puerto Varas, Chile) One of my last restaurant meals before the pandemic changed our lives was in a delightful place called El Humedal2... Continue reading
Posted Feb 10, 2021 at briciole
Thank you, Wendy. Hot soup are necessary to survive winter :) You're welcome, Camilla :) Thank you, Debra :) Good luck with the upcoming storm, Cathy :)
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Dear Lori, thank you for stopping by and for your question. Does the package say anything pertaining the cooking time? Did you boil it or cook it risotto style?
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Dear Jorge, thank you for stopping by and for your question. Ricotta is a specific food, made by coagulating whey leftover from making certain types of cheese. Formaggio is, like cheese, a generic term indicating a product obtained by fermenting milk plus additional steps, depending on the specific type. Strictly speaking, ricotta is not a formaggio, because it is not made with milk. Ricotta is eaten fresh, has a short shelf life, has a light texture, spreadable. I hope this answers your question.
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I am with you, Claudia. I sometimes cut it into florets, roast it, dress it and eat it like that to admire the pretty shape while eating. Such a marvel of nature :)
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Glad to read that baking the torte has been helpful, Cathy. I am sure whoever partook of the lovely torte was glad you made it. Blueberries are a favorite fruit here and strawberries too :)
Yes, I know we share a passion with soup, Deb :) You're welcome!
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comfort soup for winter evenings (placemat by La FABBRICA del LINO) Our current Cook the Books Club selection is Eat Joy: Stories & Comfort Food From 31 Celebrated Writers, edited by Natalie Eve Garrett 1, a collection of short pieces focused on food memories, some joyful, some painful, all interesting. Each writer shares a moment or an aspect of their life, describes the food associated with it and provides the recipe. It is a pleasant read, a reminder of our deep connection with food which crosses nationalities and cultures and brings us together as humans. In the years I have been... Continue reading
Posted Jan 12, 2021 at briciole
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Your breadfruit crostini with eggplant dip sounds good, Claudia. Glad you liked the book. The two follow-up novel are on my to-read list :)
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Frank, the article in Bon Appétit that I reference describes what you also report as the reason behind the quest for a better butternut squash. The winter squash I get from farmers I know are good, with differences related to the individual variety. I like butternut squash for soup. I like kabocha sliced and roasted. For stuffing I like delicata Candystick Dessert. I have not made gnocchi di zucca> for a while, but my favorite for those is Marina di Chioggia (which is not easy to find). Last year in Italy I tasted the zucca napoletana and liked that too. So many squashes to choose from :)
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You are welcome, Debra. Recovery is a slow process: every little step counts :)
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Thank you, Wendy :) Glad you enjoyed the reading.
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Hello Colin, thank you for stopping by and for your comment. Indeed, no onions in this recipe. I like adding fruit: when you roast fruit it adds a nice sweet note to the dish, but if you are not convinced, that ingredient is optional :)
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Appetizer in progress (placemat by La FABBRICA del LINO) Our current Cook the Books Club selection is the novel The Secret, Book and Scone Society by Ellery Adams1, a mystery that revolves mainly around a bookstore (libreria). The bookstore's owner, Nora, having once been healed by books, has chosen to do the same with other people. Besides Nora, the society of the title includes three other women, quite different from each other, each with a secret, a story she will at some point share. One of them is a baker with a special gift of baking 'personalized' scones, which evoke intense... Continue reading
Posted Nov 30, 2020 at briciole
You are welcome, Karen. I find it is a versatile side dish: it goes well with fish, meat and eggs. I am still finding the ingredients at the farmers market, so I keep making it. Thank you for your comment :)
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Thank you for your kind words, Elizabeth :)
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Thank you, Debra, and thank you again for your contributions :)
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I hope you find the seeds, Debra. I just roasted another one last night and will make more soup today. It is pretty and I love the dense flesh. I imagine it could be used in zucchini dishes where having less moisture is a plus (I am thinking fritters or bread). Mankell's mysteries are rather intense, crime-wise, so I understand preferring lighter reading. The current Cook the Books selection, though still a mystery, fits the bill :)
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