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Simona Carini
Northern California
An Italian transplanted in California
Interests: creative cooking, cheese making, bread baking, food writing, blogging, book and box making, kayaking, photography, classical music You can contact me at simosite [AT] mac [DOT] com
Recent Activity
The recent storms ushered winter big time, didn't they? I agree, cold outside makes stew welcome, Cathy :)
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No worries, Cathy: I plan to host the next round in late winter and hopefully you will be able to join then. Glad you liked the roundup :)
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The farmer who grew those zucchini specializes in lesser known vegetables. Her stand at the Berkeley farmers market always has lots of people looking at the produce she brings and listening to her explaining how to prepare it. Several varieties of fresh beans, special winter squash, beautiful radicchio: she has them all. I am not a gardener and have deep admiration for people like you who grow their vegetables, particularly in a challenging place like the Oregon coast :)
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If you have never tried cooking fresh beans, Ali, I strongly recommend it. Cranberry beans are probably the most common variety that can be found fresh at the market. And yes, I expect they would work well in this recipe.
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eggplant meets split peas (placemat by La FABBRICA del LINO) Our Cook the Books Club selection this time brings us to Iran, thanks to Jennifer Klinec, author of the memoir The Temporary Bride.1 The book starts with the story of Klinec's upbringing in Canada, her move to London to follow her corporate career and her decision to leave such career in favor of opening a cooking school out of her apartment. That is the background to her trip to Iran: Persian food called out to her and dissatisfaction with her life added its weight. In Iran, she meets a young man... Continue reading
Posted 5 days ago at briciole
You are such an amazing gardener, Claudia, I hope you'll also be successful growing beans. I am going to pace myself in reading the remaining Montalbano novels, now that I know the remaining ones are also the last ones.
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Thank you, Debra. The story of how palm dates came to be grown in Southern California is fascinating. I hope you can at least find different types of dates to taste :)
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Thank you, Phil. I am glad you enjoyed the roundup :)
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You are welcome, Debra. It is always a pleasure to host this event :)
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You may want to give The Terracotta Dog a try, then, Debra. I know I am lucky to live in a place where various traditions come together and farmers are sometimes adventurous in their selection of crops to grow :)
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By all means, let me know how it goes, Elizabeth. (And if you are in the mood for trying another unusual squash, consider the zucchetta or tromboncino squash I featured in this post https://www.pulcetta.com/2014/10/zucchetta-pomodoro-tromboncino-squash-tomatoes.html :)
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It is time to come to taste the contributions made to the 37th edition of Novel Food, the literary/culinary event that Lisa of Champaign Taste and I created in 2007. Novel Food is about prose or poetry works that inspire the preparation of dishes. I continue to host this event with great pleasure, as it brings together two of my passions: literature and food. Every edition delivers a precious reading list and a lovely set of recipes, and this one is no exception. A group of book-loving food bloggers has contributed posts, each describing a work of written words and the... Continue reading
Posted Oct 24, 2019 at briciole
So glad to read I prompted you to put on hold "The Shape of Water" at the library, Elizabeth. As the story goes, Camilleri wrote that novel thinking it would be a one-off, then his publisher convinced him to write a sequel. "The Terracotta Dog" was a big success and the rest is history. Let me know if you try cooking young zucchini greens :) (You may also be able to get seeds of Sicilian long zucchini for your garden.)
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No worries, Elizabeth. I plan to host again in late winter and hope you can join then :)
Toggle Commented Oct 22, 2019 on Announcing Novel Food #37 at briciole
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Thank you, Debra :)
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I am glad I can provide information on "unusual" produce, Frank. I get so excited when I find something new to bring home and experiment with :)
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You are welcome, Deb. It is always a pleasure to participate. And I agree, soupy beans are one of the best things to eat :)
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There are still a few novels that are being translated, Claudia, then there should be the final one, which Camilleri in an interview years ago said he had already written and placed in the safe of his publisher. In recent years he had become blind and so he dictated his novels. He worked until the end, doing what he loved. He will be missed.
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Thank you for your contribution, Claudia :)
Toggle Commented Oct 20, 2019 on Announcing Novel Food #37 at briciole
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so good, even the kitchen towel smiles (placemat by La FABBRICA del LINO) While Andrea Camilleri is probably the most famous contemporary Italian author of mystery novels, he is certainly not the only one. Among the good number of writers who have created engaging characters in recent years, Antonio Manzini is one of my favorites. Four of his novels have been translated into English, all featuring Deputy Police Chief Rocco Schiavone1: Black Run, Adam's Rib (aka Cold Death), Out of Season, Spring Cleaning (four more have been published in Italian, plus two volumes of short stories). In the first novel of... Continue reading
Posted Oct 20, 2019 at briciole
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Thank you for your contribution, Deb :)
Toggle Commented Oct 13, 2019 on Announcing Novel Food #37 at briciole
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I know I am lucky to live in a state where produce abounds, Frank. The farm that grows the cucuzza has some amazing things, including several varieties of fresh beans, different types of radicchio, special tomatoes. If you look at my Instagram feed, you'll see the beans and the tomatoes, plus a gorgeous specimen of zucca Marina di Chioggia.
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It is, Judee: it offers a historical perspectives on some of the foods available in this country. I often read that a certain food originated elsewhere, but not often do I learn how it got adopted by both farmers and the public at large. Mine also took longer than expected and I almost did not make the deadline for the post. Now they are ripening and I get to eat a couple a day: what a treat :)
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