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Simona Carini
Northern California
An Italian transplanted in California
Interests: creative cooking, cheese making, bread baking, food writing, blogging, book and box making, kayaking, photography, classical music You can contact me at simosite [AT] mac [DOT] com
Recent Activity
Thank you so much for your comment, Frank, which made me realize my sentence about squash was not clear: as with leeks, my mother didn't cook it and it was also not a strong presence around me. The full story is that the first time I saw a zucca in a vegetable garden, I was told that it was for the pig, so there was a kind of conspiracy against my appreciation of it. Fortunately, all that has changed. You may be able to find fagiolina online and it you go to Italy. There are so many "old" legumes that went almost extinct and now fortunately are being rediscovered.
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You are welcome, Cathy. Beans are so versatile and there are so many varieties of them. A bit like with apples, a handful have become "standard" but there is a richness of traditions out there and I like to continue them.
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Glad you found the selection interesting, Claudia. It was certainly a different read. I hope you can find some Candystick Dessert Delicata and if not maybe you can tell a farmer about it: it's so good! It's hard to go back to "regular" delicata now :)
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Thank you, Lynda. Glad to read you are also a leek fan :)
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dinner, plain and simple (linen by La FABBRICA del LINO) The Cooking Gene by Michael Twitty1, the current selection of the Cook the Books club, is a captivating read and a book difficult to describe in a few words: world history, food history, personal memories, travels all play a part in the story, which has an epic reach, encompassing centuries and large spaces, using the author's family tree as guide. Even before reading the book, I knew Twitty is a great story teller, whether he talks about a specific dish or is inhabiting the lives of his enslaved ancestors. I understand... Continue reading
Posted Nov 27, 2018 at briciole
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Dear Pino, thank you for stopping by and for your comment. In the second paragraph I discuss safe consumption and the post includes both the recommended method of preparing cicerchie and a warning about not eating the legume often. The addition of quadrucci e Parmigiano-Reggiano to the soup is personal and I don't claim otherwise. The original version was served with some of my homemade bread. Either way, the soup is excellent and I recommend it.
Toggle Commented Nov 23, 2018 on minestra di cicerchie / cicerchia soup at briciole
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Hi Marcia, I confirm that the high-gluten flour I have is Giusto's Ultimate Performer. I am glad my recipe and the video were useful. When working with wet dough, it helps to keep your hands and the scraper wet: it sounds counter-intuitive but it works :)
Toggle Commented Nov 23, 2018 on ftira: pane maltese / Maltese bread at briciole
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Nice choice of recipe! This time of the year, the smell of baked apples is the best. There is so much information in the book. I am also not much into genealogy, but I understand his desire to trace the history of his family. Thank you for your contribution to Cook the Books club :)
Dear Marcia, thank you so much for visiting my blog and for your question. I got the flour from the bulk section of a local store. I believe that it is Giusto's high performer and so at least 13% protein. If they still carry it, I may be able to confirm or correct my theory.
Toggle Commented Oct 30, 2018 on ftira: pane maltese / Maltese bread at briciole
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You are welcome, Cathy. I can still get zucchini here and I am eating them as often as I can, but it won't be for much longer, I know. I made the tart with red cabbage and it was quite good: I am experimenting already with winter produce (sigh)
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Please, Deb, do not worry for a moment. I understand running around like a mad woman, though I hope it won't last long, since it takes up a lot of energy. Novel Food will be back in late winter :)
Toggle Commented Oct 26, 2018 on Novel Food #34: the finale at briciole
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Thank you, Elizabeth. Glad to read you enjoyed the roundup :)
Toggle Commented Oct 26, 2018 on Novel Food #34: the finale at briciole
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Thank you Cathy. I am glad the roundup gave you ideas for books to read :)
Toggle Commented Oct 26, 2018 on Novel Food #34: the finale at briciole
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You are welcome, Phil. Glad you enjoyed the roundup :)
Toggle Commented Oct 26, 2018 on Novel Food #34: the finale at briciole
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Thank you Debra :) It was quite surprising, given that the first novel was published in 1979 (I also learned that a movie of it was made in 1998).
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I read those four novels fairly quickly, Wendy: they are engaging.
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Thank you Mae for telling me about Stargazy pie: I had not heard of it :)
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Welcome to the roundup of the 34th edition of Novel Food, the literary/culinary event that Lisa of Champaign Taste and I created in 2007. Novel Food is about literary works (prose or poetry) that inspire the preparation of dishes. I continue to host this event with great pleasure, as it brings together two of my passions: literature and food. Every edition delivers a great reading list and a lovely set of recipes. A group of book-loving food bloggers has contributed posts, each describing a literary work and the dish that the reading inspired. You are invited to follow me on a... Continue reading
Posted Oct 14, 2018 at briciole
I like that at farmers' markets I can find heirloom apple varieties and I like to taste them all, decide which ones I like best as a snack and which ones are better cooked. The recipe you chose looks great and just what's needed to warm us up on those early cold evenings. Thank you for contributing to Novel Food :)
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a favorite dinner fare (linen by La FABBRICA del LINO) At a conference this past February I met author Anne Perry and a few days later to I found myself in a bookstore that had a copy of The Cater Street Hangman, first book of the Charlotte and Thomas Pitt series1. The coincidence was too tempting to resist. I liked the book so much that I read the following three novels in the series: Callander Square, Paragon Walk and Resurrection Row. Besides being good mysteries, the novels attract me because of their setting: Victorian England. They look at the life of... Continue reading
Posted Oct 11, 2018 at briciole
Thank you, Lynda. I hope someday you'll give sourdough starter another try :)
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Hello Joe and thank you for your comment. I have a recipe for pierogi, but a vegetarian version. You can see it in this post: http://www.pulcetta.com/2014/07/pierogi-ripieno-verdure-vegetable-pierogi.html
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I remember the sourdough episode from our visit to Alaska (I don't want to think about how many years have passed since then). I understand not wanting to have that responsibility again. One way could be to befriend a baker and ask for a bit of theirs and not investing too much emotional energy into it (meaning, if it dies, so be it). The crackers are addictive: when I make them I give away some so I don't overindulge. I am also looking forward to reading Michael's book.
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