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Simona Carini
Northern California
An Italian transplanted in California
Interests: creative cooking, cheese making, bread baking, food writing, blogging, book and box making, kayaking, photography, classical music You can contact me at simosite [AT] mac [DOT] com
Recent Activity
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pretty salad for one Hippie Food by Jonathan Kauffman1, our current Cook the Books Club selection, offers a wide historical view of nutrition in recent decades, with a particular focus on foods that moved from being consumed by a relatively small number of people to becoming mainstream. Each chapter introduces a varied cast of characters each of whom has contributed one or more threads to the complex tapestry Kauffman weaves as he describe the evolution of eating habits from the 1960's to the present. As with a previous Cook the Books selection, The Food Explorer by Daniel Stone, the interest is... Continue reading
Posted 6 days ago at briciole
Chia seeds don't have a strong flavor. They are more about texture and their nutritional value. When you add water or another liquid to them and let them sit, they form a gelatinous mass which retains a bit of graininess. So the flavor mostly is that of what you add to chia seeds. In the case of the pudding, the light flavor of cashew milk, vanilla, almonds and blueberries. Almonds and blueberries also add their texture so the end result is quite pleasant (see my recipe for seed crackers as another example of the use of chia seeds)
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I've always made it with mostly spinach, as in the recipe, then a medley of herbs, mostly from my garden. When I used a lot of dill, the overall flavor was sweeter; when I used more lovage, it was a bit more astringent, so the result depends on what you use. I have also added nasturtium leaves and decorated the surface with some nasturtium flowers: it looked pretty. And yes, it is perfect for a brunch.
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Thank you, Cathy. I am glad you enjoyed the roundup :)
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Glad you enjoyed the book and the post, Tina. The chopper is quite useful, besides being pretty. I hope you find one :)
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Thank you so much, Elizabeth, for your kind words. I am delighted to read you enjoy participating in Novel Food. I am looking forward to hosting #39 in the summer. In the meantime, stay safe :)
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Thank you, Debra. Glad you enjoyed the roundup :)
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I have had it for several years, Claudia, and don't remember where I got it. My mother had it and I talked about hers in this post: https://www.pulcetta.com/2010/07/mezzaluna.html I am aware that in some places eggs are hard to find: I am glad you have a trusted supplier. We also have local sources, for which I am grateful, as we are big consumers of eggs :)
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It's fun to use, Marg. And yes, kuku sabzi is worth the time chopping requires :)
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I am glad you did, Wendy. It is definitely a dish for when fresh herbs and greens are available :)
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I am not surprised, Cam: it is so good! You are welcome :)
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Chia seeds are also versatile, Debra. And yes, I have a preference for lower calorie treats that still pack a lot of flavor :)
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Between the day I announced the 38th edition of Novel Food and today, the world we live in has changed. One of the side effects of the sheltering in place, something a lot of us are doing now, is a renewed attention towards indoor activities, like reading and cooking. It is therefore a pleasure for me to contribute a set of suggestions for both. A group of book-loving food bloggers has contributed posts, each describing a work of written words and the dish that the reading inspired. You are invited to join me on a literary/culinary tour. For each contribution, I... Continue reading
Posted Mar 27, 2020 at briciole
I considered making this soup: it is quite appealing. After reading your post I must definitely try! Thank you for contributing to Cook the Books and Novel Food :)
Thank you, Cathy. Glad you enjoyed the post :)
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Thank you so much, Elizabeth, for the cookbook suggestions. This will definitely become a classic in my kitchen. I hope your local farmers' market reopens again. Our is still open and I am so thankful! They implemented physical distance and so far it's worked well. Stay safe you too :)
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Thank you so much, Judy :)
Toggle Commented Mar 24, 2020 on Announcing Novel Food #38 at briciole
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breakfast treat or dessert? The novel Winter Cottage by Mary Ellen Taylor is set in Cape Hudson, a coastal town in Virginia. I have never visited that part of the US, so reading descriptions of the landscape was one of the book's attractions. I also liked how the three connected stories unfolded chapter by chapter. In the present, Lucy Kincaid, still grieving for the recent death of her mother, Beth, inherits Winter Cottage and upon arriving discovers that it is actually a mansion. In a relatively recent past, Beth, then a senior in high school, interviews Mrs. Buchanan, the owner and... Continue reading
Posted Mar 24, 2020 at briciole
I do too, Debra. We can use some bright color these days. You are welcome :)
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Thank you so much for your comment, Anu. I am glad to know you enjoyed the recipe :)
Toggle Commented Mar 22, 2020 on celery omelette / omelette con sedano at briciole
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I loved this dish, Frank: such a nice surprise. Thanks to our club's selections I am getting a taste of Persian cuisine and I plan to read more, including checking out the cookbook mentioned in this article
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green to celebrate spring (placemat by La FABBRICA del LINO) Our Cook the Books Club selection this time brings us to Ireland (Irlanda), yet the flavors are those of Iran (whose cuisine we savored also in a recent edition1). The novel Pomegranate Soup, by Marsha Mehran2 (zuppa di melograno), follows the adventures of the three Aminpour sisters, who escape from political turmoil in their native country to the UK and ultimately settle in the small Irish town of Ballinacroagh, where they open a small café serving dishes from their home country. The novel's cast include the sisters' landlady, the town's priest,... Continue reading
Posted Mar 15, 2020 at briciole
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You are welcome, Claudia. All's well here and I hope all is well with you too :)
Toggle Commented Mar 15, 2020 on Announcing Novel Food #38 at briciole
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You are welcome, Abihu :)
Toggle Commented Mar 6, 2020 on zuppa di spinaci / spinach soup at briciole
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And before we know it, spring is around the corner. I know, it may be a bit premature, given that the spring equinox is not yet happening, but the end of February still means most of winter is behind us in the Northern Hemisphere. It also means it is time to launch the 38th edition of the culinary/literary event Novel Food, which is a voyage of literary discovery and a delightful party featuring literary-inspired dishes contributed by event's participants. I hope you will join. I am looking forward to learning about a published literary work (a novel, novella, short story, memoir,... Continue reading
Posted Feb 25, 2020 at briciole