This is Queenofcrows's Typepad Profile.
Join Typepad and start following Queenofcrows's activity
Join Now!
Already a member? Sign In
Queenofcrows
Recent Activity
First responders (police, firefighters, paramedics) sometimes end up with large quantities of various substances on their clothing -- chemicals, blood, vomit, other bodily fluids -- that are disgusting or hazardous. So the messy clothing item gets stripped off and some random clothing -- sweats, jammies -- gets put on for the commute back to wherever a clean uniform can be found.
1 reply
Addendum: By the time this manager joined us, the touring company had been bringing their clients to our store every few weeks, six months a year, for at least five years. Our products were so popular with their client base that they used the stop at our store as a selling point in promoting their tours. No deal was offered to the touring company itself; there was no agreement between our company and theirs. The manager's deal was simply: give the tourists a discount. Nothing more.
1 reply
Pamela, if your boyfriend's parents shop at the IGA near the Artful Dodger, then you could be right :D
1 reply
Canned diced tomatoey peaches -- delicious either smooshed onto a pizza, or boiled into a soup. Yummy. Hey, I have a gallon-sized can that's labelled as canned peaches but actually contains tomato sauce (it's from the film set decorating industry, where things often get relabelled as/reused as other things) -- wanna trade? ;P
1 reply
howmanywomen.tumblr.com has a ton of personal rants on the topic. Also, if you haven't already, Google the essay about Schrödinger's Rapist -- a controversial piece of writing, but it makes a strong argument for why men should take a second look at their behaviour when interacting with women they don't know and find attractive.
1 reply
Aw geeze, did you *have* to post a picture of the lotus boob?? The other 'actual scares' are depicted with harmless photos that describe an experience -- but the thing about the lotus boob is that *the picture itself* is what is frightening, not the thought of it. Trypophobia -- fear of clustered holes/bumps -- is a little-known but surprisingly common psychological reaction to patterned bumpy or holey things such as spider eyes, the inside of a sliced-open bulb of garlic, a lotus seed pod, bumpy rashes, honeycombs, a cluster of tiny insects or their eggs, barnacles, the inside of a pomegranate or papaya....Trypophobics can have reactions that range from just being creeped-out and disturbed, to vomiting and nightmares. The lotus boob is notorious for being one of the worst (photoshopped) things a trypophobe can see. I was eating a late meal when I saw this post. Could not finish said meal. And I'm going to try to avoid this site for awhile -- not due to a one-person boycott out of any anger, but because I'm hoping this post will get buried under other posts so I don't see it again.
1 reply
I'm guessing Pumas. You know those tags and PI cards that often come hangtagged to a new pair of shoes? When I worked in shoes, that brand of shoes' hangtags were my favorite, as they frequently had witty comments and advice like this.
1 reply
Surprisingly apropos. The main ingredient in ear drops is often urea, which is distilled cow pee. (Note: I'm thinking of ear drops for earache, not for removing wax as shown in this picture.) Like many current medical treatments, this originated in an old treatment used by aboriginals and farmer since zillions of years ago. No, not cow's pee -- your own. Urine contains ammonia, which is a disinfectant, and your own body fluids are sterile to you. Pee in a cup, then pour a bit of it in your ear. But this 'homemade' treatment has been replaced by the corporate pharmaceutical version because modern taboos state that one's bodily fluids are gross and disgusting whereas medications derived from other animals' bodily fluids are somehow acceptable.
1 reply
For once, the correct form of "your"/"you're" is used -- but it's misspelled! *sigh*
1 reply
BookAce, I am so sorry this happened to you. You're one of my favorite RHU posters, and I know personally how intensely an anxiety attack can colour one's work experience, so this story hits me pretty close to the bone. There's a certain percentage of crusties who will just be mean crapheads no matter what you do. They're people who woke up on the wrong side of the bed, are angry about something (or just angry and have no reason to be), and will just bitch at whomever crosses their path. You could be the perfect slave and do everything wonderfully and polish their toes with your hair -- and they'll still bitch at you. We've all seen them, these folks that walk in looking angry before anything has happened. Or you say "Hi!" and they get pissed off at you for breathing. It's not you -- it's *them*. And I send you hugs for dealing with an anxiety attack while juggling normal custys and Madame Haggishness. Anxiety, like any other mental or physical condition, is something we learn to live with. Should I not read books or watch television just because I'm nearsighted? No, I wear glasses and sometimes squint -- and my glasses sometimes fog up. I deal with it. Should I eat only bland boring food just because I have allergies and IBS? Hells no, I watch what I eat and avoid my allergens -- sometimes I have tummy troubles, but I deal with it. Should you avoid situations where you have to interact with people? Pssht, heck no. It's just more of a challenge for you to deal with such situations than it is for folks who aren't prone to anxiety attacks. *You* know what you can handle, and what your coping techniques are. Just because something's *challenging* to do doesn't mean you should avoid it. And for anyone who can't relate to an anxiety attack, picture what the following feels like. You've got harsh PMS and/or are so underslept that you're almost crying. Your just got dumped or found out that a close friend dies like ten minutes ago -- so your ears are ringing and everything looks almost too sharp. And you've drunk waaay to much coffee so your heartrate's faster than a bunnies'. Now try to stay calm and respond professionally to that screaming crusty. *That's* what an anxiety attack feels like. (At least to me.) BookAce, you're good at your job and you're a good writer. I wish you a crusty-free weekend.
Toggle Commented Mar 1, 2013 on The Tale of Superhag at Retail Hell Underground
1 reply
Kuroneko, is there some way your grease-warpainted, wrench-wielding, no-BS-taking persona can be made into some kind of genie or comic-book-type superhero? I bet every retail worker and FFP would love to have that kind of superhero magically appear from the cash register lineup and set things straight from time to time. I wonder what the "bat signal" to request help from such a character would look like... :D
1 reply
Hoo boy do I feel where you're coming from. I've worn wrist braces at work for over a decade now and I'd say on average, for every 8 hours I work in the public eye about one to three folks feel they have the right to make Helpful Comments or share their Great Medical Knowledge with me. I'm cool with folks who think they have similar medical problems asking where I got my braces or whether they help, but those who think they're 'helping me'? Can bite me. Just because you're in a subservient position (customer service industry) doesn't mean the customer has the right to inquire about your personal private life *including any visible physical conditions*. Sure, I can see someone making one quiet suggestion or asking one respectful question, but as soon as they got even the vaguest hint that you weren't interested in discussing the subject with them, they should back the freck off and change the subject. I don't think such people would be inclined to approach a fellow customer or a stranger at a coffeeshop and comment on their unique jaw or wrist braces or goofy leg or what have you -- but somehow it's okay to corner someone while they're at work in an industry where being polite and cooperative with the customer is an enforced standard. Years of frustration with meddling-yet-wellmeaning custys have resulted in me memorizing only one standard comeback line: "I don't feel comfortable discussing my private medical concerns with a stranger" followed immediately by some trite work-related comment to get the conversation back on track. Eg: "I don't feel comfortable discussing my private medical concerns with a stranger. Will you be paying by cash, debit, or credit card?" or "I don't feel comfortable discussing my private medical concerns with a stranger. You should check out our New Arrivals section; we just got a great shipment in on Tuesday" or "I don't feel comfortable discussing my private medical concerns with a stranger. How's your croissant? Shall I top up your coffee?" Once you've stated your personal boundary, they CANNOT continue that line of conversation without getting into 'harrassment' territory. In the meantime, if said Rude Biatch comes in again, please do pass along my number to her so she can call me and I'll give her a piece of your -- er, my -- mind. 1-800- BITE MEH.
1 reply
My dear Meowth! I am so sorry you went through this! If your manager(s) were aware when you were hired that you had Aspergers -- a condition which affects, among other things, social interactions -- then if your manager chastized you for interacting with other people, you could have a Human Rights case on your hands. An employee *cannot* be disciplined for displaying symptoms of a recognized and known medical or psychological condition. (As in, Asperger's affects social interactions, and the boss chastized you for interacting with customers.) Write down everything you can remember, including any direct quotes you remember your boss saying, while it's fresh in your mind. Talk to the job placement people and any case manager you may have (especially if you have any doctor or worker who focusses on your Asperger's) -- let 'em know you were first demoted then disciplined *for having Asperger's*. 'Cause that's what it sounds like -- like they were trying to keep you tucked away nice 'n' quiet and not talking to anyone 'cause, y'know, "Oh noes, don't let Meowth talk to customers -- he might say/do something awkward!" (I hope the above can be read with the tone I intend -- exasperatedly rolling my eyes and sarcastically belittling corporation mentalities that try to stuff non-conformist individuals in limiting little boxes.) In other news, high fives and a celebratory WOOHOO YEEHEEHAW YEAH BABY!!!! -- helping customers is tough! It's tough enough for someone who is shy, or prefers being alone, or doesn't have the most suave social skills -- I can't imagine how challenging it is for someone with Asperger's! Good on you. Even if your crappy boss and company didn't appreciate it, it was still an awesome accomplishment. Take that accomplishment forward into your next job -- but that manager's feedback? Can stay in the toiletbowl where it belongs.
1 reply
The merchandiser who did this is my hero. Hearts with hands. *gawks*
Toggle Commented Aug 18, 2012 on Crazy Cooler Display at Retail Hell Underground
1 reply
I too have always shook my head at the shrill squawkings of the local hens constantly going on about how I simply must get the flu shot. I rarely if ever get sick, and they get every freaking sniffle that goes around. Funny, that. And SandwichArtista, NATs are the vermin we all would love to catch in action: Nasty-Ass Thieves.
1 reply
I too am foulmouthed as a farmer, but believe that people -- especially strangers -- should be treated with basic respect including decent language. There's a difference between, say, cussing when you stub your toe or realize your wallet has been misplaced, and swearing at someone. The line I keep in my back pocket is simply a calmly-stated: "Please don't use that language in my store." This line takes control of the situation and puts you in a position of authority by implying that they are a guest in your store, while showing the customer you're willing to treat them with with respect if they are willing to do the same for you. All you're doing is making a simple, clear request. Should they disrespect your request for them to refrain from verbally abusing you, pull out the big guns -- call a manager, or refuse to serve them, or kick them out, or just treat them like crap.
1 reply
After receiving (presumably hundreds of) letters from pissed-off retail employees, Cosmo printed an...I wouldn't say retraction or apology, more like an acknowledgement. http://www.retailhellunderground.com/my_weblog/2011/03/cosmo-apologizes-for-telling-customers-to-yell.html
1 reply
Tshirt Sponge, you have just the most charming voice and a natural 'phone smile' -- lovely to listen to, though I bet a lotta folks on the phone treat you like you're underage. Congrats on surviving BF -- and having enough energy to post this after your shift!
1 reply
Tripichik, I don't think Carotte's referring to pointe shoes, but rather to Vibram shoes that have individual spaces for each toe.
1 reply
Something like this happened to me at work a few months back (not by a crusty -- by the delivery truck driver who brings our stock), and my initial response was the same -- "ZOMG what do I do and am I just being a wimp about it!?" That mindset I think comes from years of working for various companies who couldn't give a damn about their staff -- including one boss who blamed me (short petite female) for a big drunk male customer coming after me with his fists, and another who responded dismissively to my concerns about the known violent sex offender who'd been scoping out the store and harrassing myself and another female staff member. Slaves tend to get conditioned to think of themselves as disposable and without human value, because that is how they are often treated. Hyperlink, I send you warm thoughts of reassurance and support. If you have not yet filed a report with the police, please do so and share with them all his contact and other information that's in his account. Take a few days off work, if you can -- and see if you can work just days or with a coworker for awhile. If possible, go talk to a counsellor -- this kind of thing is very traumatizing, and even if you feel 'fine' down the road, it does tend to come haunt one in the form of nightmares, panic attacks, or new phobias. Above all, give yourself time to be angry and upset, and to heal. This *is* sexual assault! The guy who assaulted me used only his hands, not his mouth -- he's being taken to court on charges of sexual assault, he's got a restraining order against contacting me or being within several blocks of my store, and he was fired from his job of 15 years. And my awesomely supportive company (retail clothing that rhymes with Toots) has banned him from all their stores for life.
1 reply
I too have totally done this. In front of a long lineup of staring customers. While wearing my manager nametag. And WMDKitty, you rock. I LOLed.
1 reply
This is awesome! As my store's chief merchandiser, I'm a big fan of subverting mannequins in subtle ways that could have been done by accident or by mischevious customers. Like, as here, putting two mannequins too close together with their hands in compromising places. Or switching the right and left (or men's and ladies') hands. Or unlocking the shoulder joints so that over a few days the arms slide down in the sleeves, turning the mannis into knuckledragging orangutangs. On my last day of my previous job, my boss trusted me to work the majority of my shift alone with no projects on a slow day. So I redid all the mannequins in the store, layering the clothes (eg undershirt - shirt - sweater - jacket). Their basic outer clothing (jeans, jacket) remained as per standard binary genderism (men's clothes on the males, ladies' on the females), but underneath they were crossdressed in various fun things (underwear, frilly teeshirt with built-in bra, etc) with padding added where needed. Male mannequins on higher-up displays that were rarely noticed by staff were accessorized with matching purses, fluffy scarves, and necklaces. Given how rarely the mannequins are changed at that store, I doubt anyone noticed until inventory week.
Toggle Commented Oct 11, 2011 on Mannequin Handjob at Retail Hell Underground
1 reply
I've been following the Jimmy story, and I have to say.... YEEEAAHHH!! This rocks. Awesome. Congrats on the newly-vacated position in your restaurant!
1 reply
Chicajojobe: At a professional piercer's shop (think of those tattoo/piercing studios), all the needles and jewelry are sterilized in an autoclave which essentially "cooks" the items to a temperature far higher than if you just boiled them. An autoclave is the same kind of gizmo used to sterilize operating instruments in hospitals. Sterilized needles etc are kept in vacuum-sealed packages until use, at which point the washed/sterilized/gloved piercer picks the needle and jewelry up off their work table (like the sterile tea-tray-thing used to hold sterile instruments beside an operating table) and opens the package immediately before piercing you. Any reputable piercer should be open to you asking questions about the steps they take to reduce the risk of contamination and keep the procedure safe and clean. Cross-contamination and bloodborne pathogens, as you noted, are no joke. The earrings at Hair's and other such places should only be considered sterilized if they are vacuum-sealed (not those little plastic boxes with lots of air in them) and have been autoclaved. They're probably clean of dirt etc, but I really wouldn't call them sterile. The piercing guns used by such places are most definitely not sterile -- each time they're used, they get hit with a microscopic mist of blood, plasma, and whatever else is in/on the person's ear. A wipedown with rubbing alcohol will get rid of the flu virus, but does little to combat the big two meanies: HIV and hepatitis. The plastic and cheap metal of those guns would definitely not withstand being put through an autoclave for proper sterilization....Even if the gun itself doesn't touch your ear, what is the piercer touching? The gun. And then what are they touching? Your ear. My heart goes out to those who work at Hair's (I've always thought that would be the *worst* place to do an annual inventory count!) and have to withstand parents pushing their crying babies and children to get pierced ears -- and I'm curious to know if any employees there are aware of any specific training on blood-born pathogens or cross-contamination that you have to take before piercing customers.
1 reply
To charge to a chipcard debit or credit card, slide the card into the slot and follow the directions on the screen. These directions include the following "please stand by" words: PLEASE DO NOT REMOVE CARD. Of course, half to a third of our customers read only the second line, remove their card, then when their transaction fails they claim the machine told them to do it -- as though arguing with me will somehow magically form a psychic link between their card and our bank.
1 reply