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Lowercase nonnumerical words referring to grades or groups of grades (except for the K in pre-K and K–12). I'm wondering what the end of this sentence is? (This is the first sentence of the Grade Names Without Numbers section.)
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Sorry, that was overstated. I believe that you have misunderstood the purpose of the majority of comments on this thread.
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Tyler, we appreciate your taking the time to respond to people's comments. But I get the impression you're willfully misinterpreting them. What all commenters seem to be saying is: PLEASE REQUIRE ISSUE NUMBERS IN ALL CASES. We're not interested in arcane procedures to find out what kind of pagination a journal uses, nor are we unclear as to why an issue number can sometimes be useful. What we're saying is that, even where an issue number is not essential for tracking down a reference, it is a small piece of useful information that doesn't really have a downside. You need to put yourself in the position of a researcher who finds a reference to an article that he or she wants to read. The researcher goes to the library to request the journal on interlibrary loan or perhaps visits a colleague's office to ask to borrow the issue in question briefly. With the rules as they are now, the researcher has to do extra work in order to find out which issue to ask for; with a simple modification to the rules, that work would become unnecessary.
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"These employees exemplified the best qualities of the American worker. They devoted their working lives to BMW, at a time when it was building and solidifying its U.S. beachhead. Their wages, with benefits, paid for a reasonable middle-class lifestyle if they managed it carefully. Throw in the job security they were encouraged to expect, and they had the confidence to make sacrifices and investments that contributed to the economy for the long term, like college education for the kids, an addition on the house, a new baby. Then one day they were handed a mass pink slip, effective in a... Continue reading
Reblogged Jul 29, 2011 at Rick's TwypePad
Nothing to do with punctuation as such, but I think it's about time that APA stop artificially preventing us from giving full information on authorship. How useful is "Zhang, D." as an author's name? For that matter, what about "Smith, J."? I say it's a cardinal sin in the information age to throw out useful metadata. If the aim is to save paper, then the full names should be truncated at the printing stage, but retained in the PDFs and on aggregation sites such as ScienceDirect. Of course, if the aim is to save paper, there are lots more useful things you could do such as eliminating the use of 3 dividers between author and year (i.e. period, space, and parenthesis).
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Stone's Ginger Flip Flip is a centuries-old half-forgotten mixed drink, similar to eggnog. It may be had hot or cold and is usually made with either fortified wine or spirits. Stone's Ginger Wine is neither, but works equally well. Since it's lower in alcohol than cream sherry, I've increased the amount of wine in the recipe. Ingredients: 1 egg 1 tbsp brandy 1 tsp powdered sugar 4 oz Stone's Ginger Wine 1 oz half-and-half nutmeg, mace, allspice, or cinnamon Directions: Shake the egg and brandy together vigorously, until homogenized. Add the half-and-half, Stone's Ginger Wine, a bit of ice (if... Continue reading
Reblogged Mar 30, 2011 at Rick's TwypePad
Serious wine lovers with a nasty cold are faced with the problem that they can't taste or smell subtle wines. Come to think of it, even the most robust styles don't get past blocked-up noses and numbed taste buds. But during a recent bout of the common one, I found a drink that did break through, delivering some sense of a proper aroma and a satisfying, soothing flavour. No, not Benylin. I refer, fellow sufferers, to ginger wine. Stone's ginger wine (and Crabbie's, though not, please, cheap supermarket imitations) proved surprisingly popular when I asked around; they're the kind of... Continue reading
Reblogged Mar 30, 2011 at Rick's TwypePad
Unfounded authority was established by citation bias against papers that refuted or weakened the belief; amplification, the marked expansion of the belief system by papers presenting no data addressing it; and forms of invention such as the conversion of hypothesis into fact through citation alone. Extension of this network into text within grants funded by the National Institutes of Health and obtained through the Freedom of Information Act showed the same phenomena present and sometimes used to justify requests for funding. Conclusion Citation is both an impartial scholarly method and a powerful form of social communication. Through distortions in its... Continue reading
Reblogged Mar 29, 2011 at Rick's TwypePad
I suppose one has to assume that the backup diesel pumps are no longer functioning, destroyed by the tsunami. Then we heard that they had tried to use battery power, but that didn't work either. I don't really understand. I thought the US military had delivered new diesel pumps to the site, what happened to them? Why are they dragging an electric cable power source in? What will they connect it to, what pumps? If the primary pumps were destroyed in the earthquake and the tsunami, and the secondary diesel pumps were also destroyed, what's the electricity for, for what... Continue reading
Reblogged Mar 18, 2011 at Rick's TwypePad
Archive your tweets, your Facebook contributions, delicious.com links, and more. Continue reading
Reblogged Mar 17, 2011 at Rick's TwypePad
Eight Tumblelog Post Formats Crisp makes eight different Post Formats available to you when you’re posting content to your blog. Crisp gives each different Post Format — Standard, Image, Link, Quote, Video, Audio, Aside, Gallery, and Status — a unique icon that instantly sets it apart for readers browsing your blog. But that’s not all. The Audio Post Format adds a clean, high-contrast audio player to your music uploads. (You’ll need the Space Upgrade to upload audio or music files.) via theme.wordpress.com a premium theme that might be good for the LLC because of the different formats and the Twitter... Continue reading
Reblogged Mar 6, 2011 at Rick's TwypePad
Finally, journaling software with that pen and paper feeling. No more white screen staring back at you. No more click this click that dilly-dallying to get to your words. Per Se is journaling software with an emphasis on what matters most: writing. Per Se features a gorgeous design and dead simple interface oriented around writing. No panes, no messy windows or tabs, just you and your journal. via www.getsprouted.com Journler developer to come out with new journalling software Continue reading
Reblogged Mar 6, 2011 at Rick's TwypePad
In APA Style, “et al.” is the only format for abbreviating citations. Consistent use of this format, detailed on pages 174–178 of the Manual, prevents any misreading or confusion about the citations. Because it is so important to acknowledge the ideas and works of others, precision and consistency are essential in the presentation of citations. For your question on running heads, yes they should be to the left in APA Style. You can find examples of in this sample paper: http://www.apastyle.org/manual/related/sample-experiment-paper-1.pdf Note that the requirements for classroom assignments and other types of publications sometimes vary from APA Style guidelines. Schools... Continue reading
Reblogged Mar 5, 2011 at Rick's TwypePad
Aren't there cases where it's actually quite important to know the punctuation of the original material? I can't actually think of any as I write (except perhaps for a paper on the history of punctuation, or one exploring whether greater use of commas is associated with neuroticism!), which suggests that these cases are not common, but the APA rules preclude any possibility of establishing whether the original material included a comma or a period. Considering the APA's strictness on direct quotes (see the response to Charlotte Cottier, above) and on non-temporal use of "while" or "since", it seems a tad strange to me that you don't push Tadmulberry's style.
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When a citation includes a digital object identifier (DOI; see Electronic Sources and Locator Information [PDF]), no further retrieval information is needed. When a DOI is not available, and a URL is included, do not include retrieval dates unless the source material may change over time (e.g., wikis). via www.apastyle.org Official APA style for retrieval dates. I'm not sure I like the second part of this. It's not only wikis that are likely to change; any website could disappear or restructure its URLs. Continue reading
Reblogged Mar 5, 2011 at Rick's TwypePad
Which APA Style Rules Are the Most Challenging to Learn? Many of you are probably wondering what error reached Number 1 in our Top 60 list. Great question! Well, the most common APA Style error is the incorrect use of numbers. Even though we examined manuscripts written by authors who used the fifth edition of the APA Publication Manual (because the sixth edition of the APA manual is so new), all of the APA Style rules violated still apply in the sixth edition. Falling into this category are (a) numbers expressed in numerals (APA, 2010, section 4.31), (b) numbers expressed... Continue reading
Reblogged Mar 5, 2011 at Rick's TwypePad
Author, A.(date). Title of document [Format description]. Retrieved from http://URL I'm intrigued by this example, which I've seen on a couple of posts on this site. Most APA reference formats have a space after the period following the author's initial and before (date), just as there is a space after the period following (date). This format seems to be a lone exception. Is there a reason for this apparent inconsistency?
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Thanks for this evocative and concise summary of how to tackle abstracts. I look forward to the upcoming post with more details. I have one question and one suggestion. When you say "illusive researcher", do you mean "illusory researcher"? Do you mean that it's fantasy to think that any given researcher is actually going to read an article? I'm afraid you've lost me here. My suggested change: in way that gives all essential information >> in a way that gives all essential information
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When you need a reference citation but nothing in the Publication Manual seems to fit, it helps to understand the generic template that all APA Style references follow. As discussed previously, the generic reference answers four interrogative questions: Who? When? What? and Where? This post addresses the “who” or author element. Upcoming posts discuss the "when," "what," and "where" questions via blog.apastyle.org This post, together with the three preceding ones linked to, does a lot to clarify the principles behind APA style. Continue reading
Reblogged Mar 5, 2011 at Rick's TwypePad
A blog article, by definition, is an article in a bigger context, the blog itself. I believe the blog name should be treated as a publication title (in italics), and should be stated. Citing a blog article is more or less the same than [sic] citing a book chapter, a journal article, or a tv series chapter. In all those cases, the name of the "bigger" context (book, journal, tv series) is stated in italics, according to APA Style. The website name is also valuable information for institutional web pages, or for pages without author. I heartily agree with this, and it's the approach I take. I may not have thought through all the ramifications, but my first reaction is that APA should push this approach as the preferred one.
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Sometimes you may want to schedule a task for a specific time. That’s easy. Referring to the above illustration, in the Calendar View just drag any Task to the time slot that you want to do it in. The Task will automatically be converted into an Event. You can disable this feature in Settings. via www.leftcoastlogic.com This feature potentially fills in the gap in GTD, i.e. when to actually do tasks. Continue reading
Reblogged Mar 5, 2011 at Rick's TwypePad
If you thought the iPad was too heavy and bulky before, just wait until you hold it next to the new iPad 2. I was on hand for Apple’s March 2 announcement and spent time working with the new, thinner design, got a feel for the cool new Smart Covers, and learned several details that didn’t make it into Steve Jobs’s presentation. (See “iPad 2: Faster, Thinner, Lighter, and Bicameral,” 2 March 2011.) via www.tidbits.com Good news on the iPad 2. Continue reading
Reblogged Mar 4, 2011 at Rick's TwypePad
Rick's TwypePad is now following APA Style
Feb 23, 2011
by Timothy McAdoo via blog.apastyle.org #APA #researchwriting Continue reading
Reblogged Feb 23, 2011 at Rick's TwypePad
Matt Kindt's crafted a horrifying hypothetical in this scifi graphic novel — what if every time you hit the hay, you woke up in a post-apocalyptic facsimile of the real world? In Revolver, Sam is a blasé twentysomething caught between two existences. When he falls asleep at night, he's transported to a parallel world in which society has collapsed and the United States is under martial law. When he falls asleep in this hellish reality, he wakes up to his boring life as a photo editor. via beta.io9.com Revolver looks like the most interesting of these 2010 comics. Continue reading
Reblogged Jan 5, 2011 at Rick's TwypePad