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So what's YOUR real name, D? If it's so important for Mike to stand by his words, you could at least offer up the courtesy of your own. Real name and references, or STFU.
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Great rant. I recommend linking a few pertinent lines directly to the Apple Korea website, and to KTF's website, so that their webmaster and pr people know what peole are saying about them online. And also maybe toning it down and sending it to a few newspapers.
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I'm in. give me the details.
Toggle Commented Sep 8, 2009 on Sweet Ass! at Scribblings of the Metropolitician
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Pulsating? Better than throbbing.
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What? No mention of GI Joe or Transformers 2? My childhood will never forgive you!
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first, congrats. second: I agree that branding happens more on the word of mouth level than anywhere else: I'd bet one of the large reasons Australia is near the top in world nation branding is because of their work visa program, where energetic young people work, travel, and then go home and rave about their amazing experience down under. I think that as far as media goes, Korea's doing about as well as it can: the Korean wave has made inroads all over; however, I think there are three discrepancies between how Korea wants to be branded and how it is. one: north korea. read an interesting editorial about how Korea should set Kim Jong-il to work in Korea's brand promotion. "The last divided nation in the world' is something no other country can claim. Promoting on that angle could attract interest, as it IS something unique, and tourists won't walk away going, "Forbidden City was bigger". Yesterday I was on the wall behind the Blue House - Bukaksan - doing the defensive wall tour, and it was a fantastic walk with good views, examples of Korea's older history, all tied up with Korea's modern situation: armed guards every 150 meters or so. That's an experience you can't get anywhere else, certainly not so close to the heart of a city. two: there is an urgent need for a public awareness campaign for Korean tourists traveling abroad. I've read (sorry, no sources) about Koreans offending the locals both in Japan (starting Dokdo chants or even carving "dokdo belongs to korea" onto the walls of traditional buildings), and also in the Phillipines, where it's reported they spend their time whoring (while refusing to use condoms), leaving behind Kophino babies, and acting as if they own the golf courses, being rude to the locals. This (along with the factory owners and mail-order husbands' mistreating Phillipinos IN Korea) leads to a lot of unnecessary ill-will. three: I think you're on the money about Hagwon owners (though I wanted to add that stuff about the image of Korea in South-Asia); I also think that Korea has a chronic problem with promoting the things THEY think foreigners should like about Korea, rather than pushing the things foreigners ACTUALLY like. Not many of us have sat through an entire pansori performance, as cool as it may be...but it's not even in our blessed language, which makes it a bit inaccessible. However, the life energy, speed and accessibility of Korean services is awesome, the people-watching and the life on the street is amazing: a "New York: The City That Never Sleeps" style promotion of a Korea full of life, variety, and energy, would be more in keeping with the things most visitors seem to enjoy about it, than a "Korea: Land of the Morning Calm" type promo. I thought Dynamic Korea was a good one. four; that being said, it's a shame that Korea isn't promoting its mountain climbing experience more. Seoul has a t least a dozen awesome peaks that can be climbed without even leaving the subway system, and many of the most positive experiences I've had with Koreans (especially older Koreans) were on the mountains. Korea's mountains are beautiful, Koreans are generally very friendly on the mountains, and Korea would benefit from promoting Korea as a trekker's paradise, and improving English signage at train and bus stations in order to give tourists and non-Korean-readers access to all the awesome peaks and hiking trails all over the country, as well as establishing more youth hostels that meet international standards and are members of international hostel organizations, both in Seoul and outside the city, to benefit backpackers (who currently go home raving about Southeast Asia, rather than about Korea). (Plus: the mountains are already there! No need to build a canal to attract tourists!) five: finally: pick a brand and a logo, and stick with it. Brand building won't show results over the next quarter, and it's foolish to be so impatient. Switching brand images so often is hurting Korea's branding, because there's none of the consistency which would eventually lead to recognition. How long has the "I (heart) NY" logo been around? Like, forever, and now it's internationally known. (edit: oh yeah. garbage cans all across the cities. and public awareness campaigns all across the nation: "You're representing your country IN your country, too" -- no littering, and no spitting, and no leaving puddles of ramen vomit on piano street awareness campaigns would be a good thing, too.)
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Maybe each administration gets a new letter, and the Clintons were all "Gumbo" "Goober" and "Gumdrop" I like Sasha's name: I just watched Citizen Kane again last week.
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wow! If it's goofy enough, "Repo" could be the Rocky Horror Picture Show for the new generation. I agree with FDA: you're just softening us up for the admission that you're back on board with the wonder girls, aren't you? Or are you going to tell us Mamamia was better than West Side Story?
Toggle Commented Sep 24, 2008 on I'm Coming Out at Scribblings of the Metropolitician
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Hi Mike. Did you post this on my page , or is somebody posing as you? . . . it doesn't seem like you to cut and paste six of your posts onto somebody's comment board.
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Cher? I heard Catwoman was gonna be Miley Ray Cyrus.
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oh dear lord, no! please don't take smokey's away from me! maybe the guy was having a bad day, or his hamster died that morning. is it a pattern of bad service, or just one time. . . because if it's just one time, I can justify going back again. . . the one thing I absolutely won't abide is that "Sorry. We don't serve single patrons. Come back with a friend," bullshit. damn "minimum two customers" rules -- I've been turned away from more places. . . and never return, and tell all my friends not to go either, because screw that! I might have been out scouting for a place to bring fifty of my dearest free-spending friends, but now they'll never have a sniff!
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aww man. That really sucks. All I have is a point and click that's fun as hell to play with, but what happened to you really stings. Hope you get replacement parts soon, and hope you keep riding your recent photography groove. It's been fun.
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I agree. Hancock joins A.I., Superman Returns, and Sam Jackson's "Shaft" as movies that could have been WAY better than they were. It also joins Wedding Crashers on the list of movies where the premise was miles better than the movie itself. Good. Worth seeing, even, as a diversion, but never quite reached its potential. Too bad, too. What a great idea to deliver only half-formed.
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Well said, Met. Korea needs to realize there's no such thing as dirty secrets any more, only dirty laundry out on display. The "if you don't like it, go home" argument holds no water in a place that claims to want to be a global hub (foreign investors DON'T like it, and they DO go home. How do you like that?), and the "you have to accept our culture" fallback holds water if Korea wants the "Discovery Channel" treatment: "Observe the Korean in his natural habitat. The indigenous peoples are xenophobic, and often misled by their own newspapers; however, they never read other language media, so they do not realize how they appear to other nations. Today is a protest day! Come closer as we watch the Korean police arrange the buses" but "You have to accept our culture" falls apart like a paper coat in a rainstorm if Korea wants to be respected as a major international player. Thanks for writing this.
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I was walking around Jongno scoping the protests over the weekend, too, and while I don't speak Korean anywhere near as well as Baeksu, here's my read on the situation: Yeah, the public discourse is encouraging -- it's refreshing to see young people care about this stuff, instead of just fussing over whether they should get the watermelon pink or hot pink cover for their phone. Even though I think the "left": Sohn Hak kyu and his crew have some really good points, and if they humble LMB enough to get him communicating better and listening before he acts, and surrounding himself with actual advisers instead of yes-men and women, hell yeah, that's good. The problem is, by mixing issues (LMB's leadership style/FTA/US Beef) one of which is very legit, one of which mostly seems to come down to ideology and economic philosophy, and the third of which is a mountain of anti-intellectual bullshit, despite having some serious, legitimate points, Sohn puts himself on extremely shaky ground, and the way he's grandstanding instead of trying to be a sober-minded, intellectually honest representative, is everything that's wrong with Korea's political scene (in my opinion). Personally, I think this protester/president standoff might go on for a while, possibly until it starts getting international press coverage that's more in depth, and when CNN, or the BBC, or Reuters, reports "a bunch of gullible korean protesters swallowed a load of bullshit psuedo-science and are now calling for the president's resignation due to unfounded fears over US beef" and have the science to back up US Beef's (relative) safety, and get to the bottom of who's rabble-roused people into this frenzy, Korea's deep concern about their international image will kick in because of the embarrassment, and Sohn will be the one taking the fall, and his LEGITIMATE gripes (LMB's leadership style, pushing through ill-conceived projects, bad communication, bull-headedness) will go out the window along with the bathwater. Frankly, I'm disappointed in both sides of the debate, because it seems to have become a Presidential authority vs. public emotion issue, instead of what it should be: both sides trying to get the facts. If people were angry about LMB's pigheadedness, go protest it! But don't add the beef bullshit, don't twist words and science, don't play language games or the culture card, if you want to still have any credibility once this fiasco is over, and Reuters has exposed Korea to a little embarrassment, and everybody's having the morning-after "did I really do that?" hangover, and realize they've been manipulated, and that the Sohn has been playing them for fools, to achieve his own political/ideological ends. So far, Sohn and his crew have played this perfectly, and LMB has bungled just about every step, but Sohn's built his castle on a house of sand, and I'm worried that if things flip, and suddenly Sohn's discredited as the one who embarrassed Korea worldwide, rather than LMB being the baddie for bringing in mad beef, LMB will manage to come out of this fiasco without having learned anything.
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That was incredible. I might even use that in my public speaking class.
Toggle Commented Jun 4, 2008 on MY Man! at Scribblings of the Metropolitician
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Hi livewithpassion: here's another reason some expats criticize Korea: 5. they have a view of Korea that you can't quite get when you're on the inside, they've been here and/or studied the country long enough to have credibility when they speak, and have enough faith and hope in the country that they believe that, once the ball gets rolling, things might get better, and they have the courage to speak up, instead of muffling their voices for fear of offending someone! A few words in Met's defence: 1. if you don't like it, you don't have to read it. 2. if there were no critics, society would never change and develop 3. by stating criticisms strongly, Met makes sure that they stick in my head; I imagine it's the same for you. if he spent all his time hedging, backpedaling and qualifying, he'd end up talking in circles and nobody'd think twice about what he finally said (after so much beating around the bush) 4. "I would sooner have you hate me for telling you the truth than adore me for telling you lies" Pietro Aretino, 16th Century satirist (quoted by BBC's Paul Danahar in a letter to Chinese netizens upset about BBC's coverage of China in the lead up to the olympics). There are lots of "first year in Korea" blogs that are full of joy, wonder, and positivity. Given what Met knows about Korea, for him to do so would be insincere, sycophantic, and asinine. (I agree it's equally asinine when Joe Firstyear criticizes Korea without knowing what he's talking about, but Met's earned his right to criticize, if anybody has.) 5. this is a blog, not a book or an academic paper: met can write what he wants here, how he wants it, and you're free to ignore it. If you want sunshine and joy and photos of people doing traditional dances, visit my blog instead of Met's. Plus, some of his posts were written when he was rightly pissed about something, and that ought to be taken into account before writing him off as a hater. . . and listen to his Seoulglow podcasts and read the more positive posts before you dismiss his criticism -- if he were nothing but a hater, he'd have written the country off and left Korea long ago; the fact he's still in SK, watching, writing, and caring, is an expression of hope for the country and the culture, if you look at it from the right angle. 6. Met might be a very warm, human, compassionate person in person -- I haven't met him, and I doubt you have, either; however, given his position as simultaneously an insider and outsider to korea, and given his extensive study of the culture and his academic training, it would almost be irresponsible of him NOT to share his view, whether you agree with his mode, or his message, or not. Criticizing Met's blog for being what it is, is kind of like criticizing a bakery for not serving fresh watermelons: it's his blog, so he can peddle what wares he wants here, and you're free to not visit, just as you don't have to go to the produce shop when you need pastries. If you want a blog that's all sunshine and joy and "I love Korea," I recommend the Korea Blog List http://koreanbloglist.com or the HiSeoul Metropolitan Government promotional page. -- criticizing all met's posts in one spot is probably not the best way to start discussions about each of them. You don't have to be the one who criticizes the things you abhor about Australia -- if that's not a role you want to play, don't do it! But somebody ought to -- if nobody holds a mirror up to a society, the society loses its opportunity to develop. But Met HAS taken on the role of the critic, and it's not yours to tell him to stop entirely, that he can/can't/ought/oughtn't do so, though it may be fair to challenge him on how he goes about it, depending on why you do so -- he's chosen his own methods, and I'm sure he's fully aware of the pros and cons of wording his arguments the way he does. Fact is, he got you reading all those posts, and thinking about them, while my joy and sunshine blog may well roll off readers' minds like water off a duck's back. At least his writing makes an impression, you know? I'm glad Met writes what he does, even when I don't agree with him: I firmly believe that if all voices are heard, the best ideas will eventually rise to the top, but that's only if each person with a different view sounds out and joins the discussion. Thanks for caring about what Met says, and adding to the discussion; there are my two bits to add on. -take care, eh?
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Though they're not star-trek related, if you liked "He's Dead, Jim," you might also enjoy: Shia LeBoeuf's "No No No" compilation: http://youtube.com/watch?v=8IXCK1EyP4s and the Wilhelm Scream: http://youtube.com/watch?v=4YDpuA90KEY&feature=related
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So to be sure I understand you, James, you are suggesting that 200 Pounds Beauty should be read as a commentary on Korean celebrity culture (especially as it pertains to surgery) more than as a commentary on Korean beauty/surgery culture? That's another way of looking at it that I'll have to mull over for a while. It may even bear re-watching the movie with that in mind before I write about it on my blog. We'll see if I agree with you after I've watched it again. Back to THIS post: keep up the good fight, Met. Any results so far?
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Well said, Met. I'm glad you took the time write this up so clearly on your site. I won't say it's necessarily surprising in the country of "200 Pounds Beauty" to hear the kind of flack Soyeon's taking, but it sure is disappointing. Mind if I link to it?
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Well, hat tip to Collegehumor.com for letting me on to these: these three links have helped me make up my mind about Obama vs. Clinton. (Now I just wish I were American, so I could vote for one of them.) Footage from Hilary's trip to Bosnia: http://www.collegehumor.com/video:1808560 And, uh, I don't really know what to say about this one, but I laughed like hell. http://www.collegehumor.com/video:1808402 Finally, if you haven't made the connection yet: http://radaronline.com/quiz/2008/03/jesus_or_barack_obama_quiz_01.php
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"How To Increase Hits On Your Expat In Korea Blog" 1. Write something super-critical of Korea, and anonymously forward the link to VANK or the "Wifeloggers". Use perfect English, to rub it in. 2. Write something super-critical of English Teachers, and anonymously forward the link to Marmot. Include typos grammar mistakes and poor reasoning if possible, just to increase the level of outrage. 3. Post snarky, wise-ass comments that don't actually add anything to the discussion on popular sites like Met, Marmot, Gusts, Grand Narrative, Homonid, etc., and include links to your blog. Works every time! Robo-funny-instead-of-lame-because-he-admits-it-seyo (ps: trolling works too, but then I'd be a troll.)
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It did? Sweet! Looks like my novel, "Jedi Robot Space Pirates vs. Shape-Shifting Telepathic Alien Wizards" will find a publisher after all! Maybe Natalie Portman's rethinking the marriage proposal I mailed her, too! (or was this meant to be a Hilary/Obama Oh/Tx reference?)
Toggle Commented Mar 6, 2008 on Crap. at Scribblings of the Metropolitician
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I don't know this guy at all, but as a prayer for my friend who lives near him, who is also part time and also not covered by insurance, and in memory of the time my former boss asked me if I wanted to opt in or out of the insurance coverage at my second hogwan (I opted in, after careful consideration), I'm chipping in, too. We foreigners gotta watch each other's backs: Koreans aren't the only ones who have jung for their own! roboseyo.blogspot.com
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Yeah I had a friend who featured most of those HPD traits, and I once suggested that maybe a professional counselor would be better equipped than an English teacher, to help her sort through her desire to either kill herself or see her father die in pain. Her response was "I can see you're not my friend". . . the personal equivalent of the cultural reaction, "If you don't like it, go home". When it comes to personal interactions, scorn is touchy (and pardon my taking your satire too seriously). I don't know if scornful potshots help, but it IS frustrating when my well-informed and well-supported critiques are given just as much weight and welcome as Joe Firstyear's indiscriminate "this-is-actually-just-culture-shock" critiques/lashings-out.
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