This is Rockeye13's Typepad Profile.
Join Typepad and start following Rockeye13's activity
Join Now!
Already a member? Sign In
Rockeye13
Recent Activity
I remember scraping along the skin of a C-130 once myself... Boy did that sting. That video had more twists than a bag of twizzlers.
1 reply
I learned three rules from a friend I played rugby with. This is a guy who gets stoned before he goes to lift weights yet has managed to earn a doctorate. Rule One: Show up to EVERY class. Rule Two: Sit in the middle of the front row. Rule Three: Contribute something every class. That's it. Showing up every day is self explanatory. Sitting in the middle front ensures the instructor notices you and also keeps you on your toes. Being a consistent contributor also keeps you on your toes, but it also lets the instructor know it too.
1 reply
I had to check my calender to make sure it wasn't April 1st today. Perhaps I can get an award today if I don't rob a bank, or take advantage of that passed out sorority girl tonight . . .
1 reply
As the internet steamroller Glenn Reynolds says and most veterans understand deep down inside, "Sheepdogs, not sheep."
Toggle Commented May 4, 2010 on Veteran Extremists in Time Square at BlackFive
1 reply
I hadn't ridden a bike in more years than are healthy to mention, when I decided to buy one last year. I gotta admit, that seatpost shock-absorber tube thingie is just the ticket for a fatass like me. No small amount of trauma was avoided with it's help.
Toggle Commented Apr 3, 2010 on My new wheels at BlackFive
1 reply
My experiences in the Army seemed to highlight just how little connection there was between the PT tests and actual ability to perform a given MOS. There are just so many tasks that have to be done while out in the woods that aren't MOS related at all, but have to be done by someone. I am a very large man, so I got to carry around the M60 MG. That also meant I had to dig lots of foxholes to put the machine gun in. That crap gets tiresome fast. I would really have resented carrying around other guy's basic equipment. I was in an airborne artillery unit, in the commo platoon. That means there was a lot of very heavy equipment to move around. Those radios might have said "two-man lift" on them, but we were way too busy for that crap. I have no problems socially with females in combat arms units. My issues are much more functional. If a female can do the actual job then I've got no legitimate beef with her in my section. Any female who can do the things an actual 11B does while in the field can take care of herself just fine. As to the worry some have about menstrual periods and the field; that's a red herring. LOL. I made a funny. Seriously though, just stick a tampon or pad in every second or third MRE and you're covered. It isn't as if MREs aren't already full of shit troops just throw away anyway. As an aside, I can just see it now: grunts tossing MRE candy to the kiddies and tampons to their mothers. Talk about hearts and minds.
Toggle Commented Feb 18, 2010 on Women in Combat? at BlackFive
1 reply
I think that the idea of using PT test scores to determine just how fit a man or woman is for combat is problematic, at best. While I was in the 82d, my wife was in the 6th Psyops Bn, and a PT beast. She could do as many situps and nearly as many pushups as I and our 2-mile times were comparable. However, she was 4'11" and doing pushups/situps with her body weight, which was about half of my 230 pounds. The combat load, weapons, body armor, MREs, radio batteries, and all the other sundries soldiers hump around are of a fixed weight, not prorated for height or BMI. My little paratrooper wife wouldn't have been able to carry anything like a combat load no matter how much she worked out. The strongest woman in the world (based on powerlifting records) is about as strong as the strongest 14-15 year old boy. The plain fact seems to be that the ability to carry around full, modern, combat loads in the field requires a slightly-above average man who has trained for it via Basic Training, AIT, and unit PT. That same physical load would require a woman who is an elite athlete and has been hitting the gym fanatically. I met one woman during my service who might be able to hack an airborne infantryman's load: a 180-lb powerlifting champion. Hardly representative. That said, if she could handle the training then I'm all for it. I think what is needed though, are realistic physical standards for various MOSs. Pushups, situps, and two mile runs give a weak evaluation of actual fitness outside of a gym and in the boonies. I'd like to see a timed obstacle course along with a timed march with combat load added, possibly with job-specific tests as well. I don't care if a trooper is gay, girl, boy, or only has one leg. If they can do the job, then they should be able to get the job.
Toggle Commented Feb 18, 2010 on Women in Combat? at BlackFive
1 reply
Look, when the US Army can find a woman that can hump a 90-lb ruck along with the rattle and weapon, and do it for 15 miles a day for a week straight, then she should be allowed to go to 11B school or whatever she feels like doing. Honestly man, I wouldn't want any of that action. That girl WILL NOT look like Demi Moore. She'll look like me, but her moobies will be boobies and no more attractive.
Toggle Commented Feb 17, 2010 on Women in Combat? at BlackFive
1 reply
What I want to know is how long before we can get a shark-portable model?
1 reply
The First Amendment has been interpreted very broadly when it has been invoked in the past. Artwork, pornography, and many other forms of communication have been held as protected speech so it might be reasonable that the Stolen Valor law might very well be an unconstitutional restriction of our freedoms of speech. Like flag-burning, pretending to have a Silver Star etc. is wrong, but I'm not sure that that criminalizing either is compatible with a free society and its liberties. Once we start making exceptions to free speech rights then it's a very slippery slope that only goes down. Hanging a photoshopped diploma on one's wall isn't a criminal offense, either. Yet. But if Stolen Valor is to be a model law then it might also become a crime. There are plenty of activities which are objectively wrong in a moral sense but not in a legal sense. The only proper treatment for those who would claim falsely to have received military decorations is being held up to public shame, as vigorously as possible.
Toggle Commented Feb 13, 2010 on "Stolen Valor" law under attack at BlackFive
1 reply
I'm with you on the ass-clown descriptor. Anyone who rats his buddies out looking for an easy way out deserves what they get. Treachery is its own reward.
1 reply
Hearing about Shifty reminds me of 1SG Leonard Funk (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Leonard_A._Funk,_Jr.) . Another true leader of men, and part of the Greatest Generation. It was the annual division review, and true to form hot as hell. For those of you who haven't been part of such an event, imagine an entire division of troops all marching together to a huge field then standing there for ages while others speachify. Bands play, politicians tell us how great we are, A-10s screech overhead, men with high rank talk about the frontier of freedom; you get the idea. Standing in a division review was the first time I heard the song "God Bless the USA" by Lee Greenwood, who had come himself to sing it. Talk about a great memory. Still, standing at attention and parade rest for hours still sucked, overall. Especially in the North Carolina summer. That year the special guest was 1SG Funk. My battery had just had a fearsome round of immunizations a few days earlier, and many were ill and feeling deathly, some few even passing out. With fixed bayonets. Yikes. 1SG Funk was introduced, took the podium, and looked us over, all 20+ thousand. He said (something like) "Men, I've been right where you are today and I know what its like. God bless you all." Then he sat down. No speech lasting 45 minutes. No dragging it out. Just a man who knew how to make 20,000 men very happy. I knew then that he truly was a great man, and leader. Those of us who have been warriors know how much individual charachter counts for, and just how few of us have what these men had. He died a few years later and I mourned his passing. I'm sure that many of us have memories of such men. Also for what its worth, to those of us tempted to throw stones at Michal Jackson: try growing up the way he did. Parents truly matter and he had some of the worst.
1 reply
Preachin' to the choir, Jimbo. I've got to believe that 95% of B5s readership shares your opinions of the douchnozzles in DC right now. Sadly though the only two tools which work at pruning politicians are money and bad press. Soros et al has the first covered and the MSM has their backs on everything else. This should be a time of great opportunity for the GOP but they are pissing it away. Lack of a coherent philosophy, leadership splits, its just a mess. The democrats have always been a party of coalitions and interest groups. Now its our turn. Ron Paul has one wing, the creationist luddites another, and Arnold in Cali has the remains. Mix it all together and you have one big ol' bucket of fail. I guess I'll just have to hide it all out in my Y3K bunker.
1 reply
Good for her, but honestly, who keeps track of such statistics?
1 reply
The tango-drop is the finest dance of all.
Toggle Commented Jul 8, 2009 on On the Careful Offensive at BlackFive
1 reply
These "super units" would be a new type of unit, probably under the SOF umbrella. They would be hell on wheels for commando ops but we already have rangers for that stuff. These guys would seem to be intended as an intermediate step between standard SF units and standard combat arms. That is, less specialized than a SFOD but much more flexible than your garden-variety infantry units of equal size. Of course, that's the point. As far as the "soft assets" go, you're probably right that assigning them to a company-level organization might be best for them. Centralization of support assets should work down at the company level. Upon deployment platoon and even squad-sized elements might be the way to go, depending upon the mission. I personally like the base unit as a platoon, the way SF units seem to base themselves upon what is essentially a squad. I'm not sure how well they would 'aggregate' when needed, but that's more of a tactical problem-not exactly my specialty. As far as "teeth" goes evolving military technology seems to be growing them everywhere. On-call GPS-guided artillery, SDBs, armed UAVs, and OICWs are all wonderful.
Toggle Commented Jun 14, 2009 on Squad Sized Super Units? at BlackFive
1 reply
A small-sized "super" unit sounds like a great idea in general. I'd like to ask what these teams missions would be. Unless the team's mission is pure combat I'm not sure that anything less than a platoon (say 36 troops) would really be feasible. Just not enough troops who can be trained up to SF quality. Beyond just the toughness and intelligence necessary to be a good SF-type lies the training. Lots and lots of training. Making super units out of standard troops would require getting two or three standard troops taking the place of one 18-something-or-other. Lets just say a 36-troop Super Team. Start with three 9-troop combat squads backed up by a 9-troop support squad. TOE items are easy; just buy whatever equipment is needed. Its the troops that are complicated to acquire. What kind of skill mix would be ideal? Again, this depends on what they are expected to do. Will this team be expected to control one ten x ten mile square piece of territory, or one village less than or equal to say 2,500 people? Maybe the are expected to protect a certain logistic asset or stretch of road. Sounds an awful lot like SF stuff. How's this for a Super Team. Start with 1/2 of a SFOD-A team: one SF medic, engineer, commo, and two weapons guys. Make them section leaders. Give them each five troops. Five medics, Five combat engineers, Five RTOs, and ten 11Bs. The Super Team commander (1LT in the SF branch) would command his own five-troop HQ team: a platoon sergeant, a civil arrairs troop, an intel guy, a mechanic, and a clerk. High tooth-to-tail ratio. Good internal skill mix. Should function well with a minimum of outside logistics support.
Toggle Commented Jun 13, 2009 on Squad Sized Super Units? at BlackFive
1 reply
For all the good that moral indignation does (outside of America) I only have to look at my Yahoo! news feed this morning. Under my political news tab I see "UN demands Tamil Tigers stop fighting in Sri Lanka" three posts before "Sri Lanka rejects ceasefire pleas." How's that "international test" working for everyone? And when is the last time that "UN Demands" met anything but the embarassed silence heard after some foolish social faux paux?
Toggle Commented May 14, 2009 on Obama blocks release of photos at BlackFive
1 reply
Here's another idea; how about a battery recharging system that uses the pressure generated from a boot-heel striking the ground and converts it into electrical energy. Maybe a minature dynamo spun via spring, hydraulic, or pneumatic action. Replace the heel unit with this, running a wire up the ACU trousers into a litium-polymer battery pack stored in an exterior pocket. That same battery pack should of course be connectable to the little solar panel which is hung off the top of the rucksack. Those same batteries and solar panels should be able to be connected in parallel or series to power anything from a flashlight to a laptop. The replacement heel unit shouldn't weigh anymore than the one it replaces, and must be both durable and do what boot heels are supposed to do, protect the foot.
1 reply
I thought that was the USMC who ran into the whole "a rock" problem.
1 reply
Myself, I would like to see the next iteration of the HMMWV be amphibious. That is, a partially sealed body with either a PTO powered propeller (WW2 DUKW-stye http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/DUKW) or a small easily installed and removed water-jet. Give it a 5-10mph speed in water and now you've really got something cool. Not every war is going to be in mountains, deserts, or places with an excess of bridges you know. Of course, the Gama Goat ( http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gama_Goat ) was amphibious, too . . . I was never brave enough to try when I had the chance.
1 reply
I wonder if a crash harness and beefy rollcage might be a better approach. Granted, it would have to be an extra-extra beefy rollcage. Zero-Zero ejection seats cost at least as much as a fully uparmored and armed hummer so nobody will be buying those anytime soon.
1 reply
Not an engineer my friend, just a nurse who used to be in the 82d. Math is hard, you know. Anyway, I once tried to start an IV on myself once because I hadn't brought enough water to drink and I was just dying. MOPP-4, Fort Bragg, and August are a sucky combination. IV solution tastes that bad, that I decided to poke holes in myself rather than drink that dog-spit. I spend way too much time daydreaming, so if you have any other ideas you're trying to buff up just drop me a line. rockeye13@gmail.com
1 reply
This sounds like a real "Army of Davids" approach, and a great idea. Since I'm wonderful at adapting existing ideas but pitiful at coming up with original concepts myself, I'll be just fine on the patent angle.
Toggle Commented May 8, 2009 on Help an Infantryman Out at BlackFive
1 reply
Uber Pig: just do a google image search for "vial-mate adaptor." This is a small vial attatched to the bottom of a standard IV bag which generally holds some powdered medication. Give it a push to pierce the barrier between the bottle and IV bag, swish back and forth, and voila, just what you're looking for. Some IV medications aren't stable for very long once mixed so they are reconstituted just before use; thats why this system was invented. I would think that this system could be adapted several ways. Using a base solution of sterile water one could add a user-chosen additive vial: oral rehydration electrolyte solution, IV rehydration solution, or perhaps generic IV solution/medication mixtures optimized towards a particular condition. Burns, excessive blood loss, contaminated wounds, etc. As far as a way to cool drinkables in the field. 1. Use a wide mesh pouch with openings large enough to allow unimpeded airflow but small enough not to let the can/bottle fall out. 2. Wrap the bottle/can in cloth or paper soaked with water. 3. Tie some 550 cord to the whole mess and spin it around and around until evaporation cools the can, re-wetting as needed. I wouldn't recommend this process for carbonated drinks, though, so proceed at your own risk.
1 reply