This is drSpace's Typepad Profile.
Join Typepad and start following drSpace's activity
Join Now!
Already a member? Sign In
drSpace
somewhere in space
Hearts of Space radio and online music service producer
Recent Activity
Image
Composer CONSTANCE DEMBY passed peacefully in 2021 at age 81. She was an original character, a fun-loving free spirit who emerged out of the creative upheaval of the 1960s as a "sound sculptor" of resonant steel instruments, and member of an anarchic hippie musical group from Maine. After the group disbanded in the mid-1970s, she was drawn to the spiritual path, studied yoga, made the pilgrimage to India, and began to compose devotional music. Back in the U.S., she settled in Northern California, started her own cassette label, and pursued a recording career armed with a modest musical education enhanced by great intuitive intensity. She was gifted with a profound talent for melody and a lavish gift for orchestration that served her well. From her earliest recordings she aimed to create what she called "sacred space music" — at first with acoustic instruments, later with electronic synthesizers and studio tools. She was one of the earliest adopters of electronic sampling keyboards, which gave her access to the full spectrum of orchestral instruments she employed in her choral symphonies. On this transmission of Hearts of Space, a Constance Demby posthumous retrospective, on a program called SANCTUM SANCTORUM. [ view playlist ] [ view Flickr image gallery ] [ play 30 second MP3 promo ] Continue reading
Posted 3 hours ago at hearts of space | news
Image
The great Southern lands known today as Australia and New Zealand were once called "the Antipodes" (an-TIP-ohdees) by the British. The word literally means 'the other side of the world.' If you tunneled straight down from the British Isles through the center of the earth, Australia is roughly where you'd emerge — upside down, of course. Even after it was colonized by the British, for centuries Australia was seen by the rest of the Western world as remote, exotic, and inaccessible. And even in the internet age, this isolation has meant that Australian music, art and culture has often gone unnoticed. Yet since the late 1970's, Australia has seen talented composers creating rich veins of contemporary music, including space-creating instrumental music in a variety of styles. On this transmission of Hearts of Space guest-produced by our Australian colleague MIKE G (the man behind the essential web site AmbientMusicGuide.com) a selection of ambient and atmospheric music by Australian artists from the 1980's to the present, on a program called "ANTIPODEAN SPACE." [ view playlist ] [ view Flickr image gallery ] [ play 30 second MP3 promo ] Continue reading
Posted 7 days ago at hearts of space | news
Image
One of the core experiences of ambient and electronic spacemusic is the feeling of weightless floating. These subtle sounds seem to dematerialize us, expand our personal space, and slow our sense of time. It's kind of magical — and for many of us, highly pleasurable, even addictive. Since the introduction of mass-produced electronic instruments in the 1970s, anyone can create floating textures, but even if you're just a listener, the experience is widely enjoyed and often described in therapeutic terms as relaxing, healing, and transformative. On this transmission of Hearts of Space, another anti-gravity journey on electronic waves, on a program called FLOATING WORLDS 2. Music is by PAUL AVGERINOS, ERIK WØLLO, HOWARD GIVENS & CRAIG PADILLA, PHILLIP WILKERSON, and MAX CORBACHO. [ view program page ] [ view Flickr image gallery ] [ play 30 second MP3 promo ] Continue reading
Posted Apr 30, 2021 at hearts of space | news
Image
DRONES—not the ones that fly, take pictures and drop bombs, but sustained musical reference tones—have been used for thousands of years. Simple, effective, and popular, drones originated in ancient southwest Asia, and spread to Europe, India, and Africa. For many contemporary listeners, their first encounter with a drone was in Indian classical music. It's normally produced by a dedicated instrument called the tamboura (or tanpura), which creates a sustained buzzing sound with the reference pitch and a harmonic fifth above it. Some Indian instruments like the sitar, sarod, and saranghi have drone strings built-in. Not to be outdone, western bagpipes produce multiple drones, as does the medieval hurdy-gurdy. And today, drones are common in electronic and avant-garde music. Microtones are another basic feature of Indian music. Where western music uses just 12 equally spaced tones to the octave, Indian scales typically have 22, allowing more elaborate melodies and ornamentation. On this transmission of Hearts of Space, we return to the entrancing sounds of Indian contemplative music, on a program called DRONES & MICROTONES. Music is by SAMIR BODHI, HANS CHRISTIAN, AL GROMER KHAN, J.J. GREGG, RAMAN & SRIKANTH, MANOSE, and AMELIA CUNI & WERNER DURAND. [ view playlist ] [ view Flickr image gallery ] [ play 30 second MP3 promo ] Continue reading
Posted Apr 24, 2021 at hearts of space | news
Image
A WEEK AGO ON SUNDAY APRIL 11th, we finally released our all-new app for iOS devices: iPhone, iPad, and iPod Touch. If you're a current Hearts of Space Full or Standard service subscriber you got an email advising you of the update. If your device was set to accept updates automatically, it happened overnight and the next time you signed in you were in a shiny, happy new world. We'll be the first to admit that it took forever. The entire development process stretched over FIVE YEARS: | Phase 1 included our first full "API" (Application Programming Interface — the protocols that allow computers to negotiate with each other) and an all new "back end" infrastructure running in the Amazon Web Services (AWS) cloud. | Phase 2 was a completely redesigned and rewritten web site and a new HTML5 Player launched in December 2019. | Phase 3 is the new iOS apps and soon-to-come Android apps, which deliver "feature parity" with our main web application. Now anything you can do on the web site you can also do on the mobile apps. This was by orders of magnitude the biggest and most complex software development project we've ever attempted. God Bless ALEX BURROWS and his team at BAY INTERACTIVE for their extraordinary patience and competence! We spent almost two years testing and refining the design of the user interface to make an inherently complex application as intuitive as possible. We resisted massive pressure to launch before it was ready, and conducted a rigorous six week beta test with over 200 participants. The payoff was that the rollout went off with just a few minor issues, immediately spawned dozens of rave reviews from our users in the App Store, and a solid 5 Star rating. Sweet! We encourage every fan of... Continue reading
Posted Apr 19, 2021 at hearts of space | news
Image
Music is something we literally create out of thin air. For millennia it was defined by the sound of physical instruments and the human voice. As instruments evolved and became more refined, music became more complex and sophisticated. By the late 19th century, French composers like Debussy and Ravel were creating orchestral "impressions" of imaginary places and events—an early form of what we now call Virtual Reality. Since ancient times, literary and religious texts have described mythic fantasy worlds with magical and supernatural elements. It took music centuries to catch up, but in the 20th century, electronic instruments finally gave composers a virtually unlimited set of tools to create imaginary environments. Today we have music for fantasy films and video games, and ambient composers invent fantastic immersive environments for our traveling pleasure. On this transmission of Hearts of Space, virtual realms of fantasy and imagination, on a program called IMAGINARY WORLDS. Music is by ISHQ, DESENSITIZED, STEVE ROACH & SERENA GABRIEL, DEBORAH MARTIN, KEVIN BRAHENY FORTUNE, and KRILL.MINIMA. [ view playlist ] [ view Flickr image gallery ] [ play 30 second MP3 promo ] Continue reading
Posted Apr 17, 2021 at hearts of space | news
Image
It's official: spring at last. After the proverbial long hard winter, spring takes on an almost mythic appeal. Of course, here in California, it's been spring on and off for several months. So first, our sympathies to those whose winter must have seemed interminable. The music of spring expresses renewal and rebirth, with energy, buoyancy, optimism and hope for the season to come. Ambient composers mix flowing water and other natural sounds into their compositions, along with airy, ethereal flutes and keyboards, to create nature-inspired meditations. On this transmission of Hearts of Space, an ambient excursion for the season, on a program called DREAMS OF SPRING. Music is by DEUTER, PETER KATER, SHERRY FINZER, MANEESH DE MOOR, STEVEN HALPERN & MICHAEL DIAMOND, and (no kidding) CHRISTOPHER of the WOLVES. [ view playlist ] [ view Flickr image gallery ] [ play 30 second MP3 promo ] Continue reading
Posted Apr 9, 2021 at hearts of space | news
Image
No European musician has achieved the status of JOHANN SEBASTIAN BACH, who is regularly cited as the greatest composer in history. He dominated the Baroque era of 18th century Germany, and in retrospect, played a key transitional role in the evolution of Western classical music. His virtuosity as a performer, productivity and brilliance as a composer, the vast range of his secular music and sublime profundity of his religious music — have never been equaled. An innovator in his time, he expanded the role of the pipe organ in the church and embraced new styles, while his adoption of the "well-tempered" scale set the course for the future. Beyond its breadth, depth, intellectual and emotional power, the appeal of Bach's music can be attributed to something more basic: Bach was a master of melody. The spacious lyricism of his chorales and contemplative arias creates an atmosphere of sacred mysticism that's as relevant today as it was in Baroque Germany. On this transmission of Hearts of Space from our regular guest producer for classical and sacred music ELLEN HOLMES, an all-Bach program called IMMORTAL MELODIES 2. Performances by pianists CHAD LAWSON, MARTA & GYORGY KURTÁG, and ANNA GOURARI, cellists YO-YO MA and ELISE ROBINEAU, organists FRANZ HAUK and OLIVIER LATRY, and strings by FRETWORK, the BBC PHILHARMONIC and the BBC SYMPHONY. [ view playlist ] [ view Flickr image gallery ] [ play 30 second MP3 promo ] Continue reading
Posted Apr 3, 2021 at hearts of space | news
Image
It's well established that electronic music naturally creates images of cosmic space. Almost fifty years ago, it was given the logical name: spacemusic. The genre has two common modes: flying music is rhythm-powered and goal-oriented, moving through space bound for distant galaxies; floating music is static and timeless, resting peacefully in vast, silent starscapes. As the genre evolved, electronic composers gave expression to the drama in the supreme adventure of exploring the cosmos — a feeling we share today even on missions close to our home planet. They ask the existential and extraterrestrial questions: Who are we? and Are we alone? On this transmission of Hearts of Space, it's another cosmic-electronic journey, on a program called SECRETS OF THE STARS. Music is by EXTRAWORLD, STARTERRA, DAVE LUXTON, SEABAT, JONN SERRIE, DREAMSTATE LOGIC, and JAJA. [ view playlist ] [ view Flickr image gallery ] [ play 30 second MP3 promo ] Continue reading
Posted Mar 27, 2021 at hearts of space | news
Image
This week we transit the Spring Equinox, the official beginning of spring and a good time to check in on the ambient space guitar. Acoustic or electric, live or sampled, looped or direct, straight up or processed, folk, jazz, or classical — even in the electronic age, the venerable six string guitar continues to make itself indispensable almost everywhere music happens. Guitarists of the Ambient persuasion take it slow, quiet, and spatially expanded, leaving the virtuosic fireworks to their rock brothers and sisters. Occasionally...a heroic rock guitarist like JEFF BECK or BUCKETHEAD will journey to the contemplative side of the instrument just to do something completely different. On this transmission of Hearts of Space, a spacey, twangy, laid-back, subtle, turn-of-the-season journey for ambient guitar — on a program called SIX STRING SPRING. Music is by CHRIS HAUGEN, LISA BELLA DONNA, CLAES NILSSON, CARL WEINGARTEN, BLUE STAR, and TONY GERBER, with PHIL KEAGGY and DREAMHUB. [ view playlist ] [ view Flickr image gallery ] [ play 30 second MP3 promo ] Continue reading
Posted Mar 20, 2021 at hearts of space | news
Image
This week, dear listeners, we come once again to our yearly celebration of all things Celtic. Though the time has passed when Celtic music was trending, it's a tradition that continues to evolve. Ireland has boomed and bust, and through it all the beauty and spirit of Celtic music has continued to charm audiences around the world, with its brilliant dances and heartfelt airs and ballads. In the poetic imagination of the Celtic bards and troubadours, travel metaphors are as common as thoughts of home. On this transmission of Hearts of Space, we take another journey across those green and rocky lands, on a program called THE CELTIC ROAD. Music is by DAVY SPILLANE, MOYA BRENNAN, LISA LYNN & ARYEH FRANKFURTER, LOREENA McKENNITT, AINE MINOGUE, DAVID ARKENSTONE, BRAGH ADAIR, and JAMES GALWAY & PHIL COULTER. [ view playlist ] [ view Flickr image gallery ] [ play 30 second MP3 promo ] Continue reading
Posted Mar 12, 2021 at hearts of space | news
Image
I think we can all agree that the last year of the pandemic — from March 2020 to March 2021 — has been one of the most difficult, disrupted, and disheartening in American history. One memorable commercial starring the devil and his girlfriend dubbed it "The Year From Hell." No one argued. The unprecedented strain on our collective nerves led to a boom in therapeutic, calming, psychologically healing music and media. Much of it here on Hearts of Space was dark and melancholy, reflecting feelings of fear, isolation, depression, and loss. With the arrival of powerful vaccines and new management, things have finally started to improve. And while it's not yet time to celebrate, we've begun to allow ourselves a positive view of the future. Optimism emerges when hope turns into real, positive change. Like prayer, hope is intangible—a hazy image of a better future. Optimism is hope fulfilled, based on real events and how they're moving. Optimism inspires music with a positive tone, fresh energy, a sense of comfort, and expanding possibilities. It's a rest stop on the road to joy. On this transmission of Hearts of Space, optimistic ambient for improving times, on a program called — OPTIMISM. Music is by THIERRY DAVID, DAVID HELPLING, DIGITONAL, and LIQUID MIND. [ view playlist ] [ view Flickr image gallery ] [ play 30 second MP3 promo ] Continue reading
Posted Mar 6, 2021 at hearts of space | news
Image
Winter...has a way of overstaying its welcome. After several months of sullen skies, numbing cold, and too many days of frigid rain, sleet, or snow—even the most ardent champions of the season fall silent. We've arrived...at forbearance. Here in California, the trees blossom in mid-February regardless of the weather. After a big rain, the ground is strewn with pink and white petals. Soon the storms will taper off and spring will arrive. For most of the country though, there's still a long time to wait. Ambient electronic artists find inspiration in the winter atmospheres, and create music with dark drones, virtual storms, chilled tones, and monochromatic harmonies. On this transmission of Hearts of Space, it's another wintry journey on electronic waves — on a program called WINTERTRONIC. Music is by TRANSPONDER, HOLLAN HOLMES, SOLARIS, NETHERWORLD, BLUETECH, KIRSTY HAWKSHAW, JANNE HANHISUANTO, and ILUITEQ. [ view program page ] [ view Flickr image gallery ] [ play 30 second MP3 promo ] Continue reading
Posted Feb 26, 2021 at hearts of space | news
Image
The ambient-neoclassical duo of pianist DUSTIN O'HALLORAN and electronic musician ADAM WILTZIE — collectively A WINGED VICTORY FOR THE SULLEN — have a name that not only sets them apart, but needs some explanation. As you might expect for two Americans who met in Italy while touring, their music has more to do with European art than their roots in California and Texas. It starts with the Greek goddess Nike, who became the Roman goddess of victory, conveniently named Victoria. She's familiar to students of art history as a triumphal winged figure on coins, jewelry, and architecture. Her most famous monument is The Winged Victory of Samothrace, now in the Louvre—a masterpiece of Hellenistic sculpture and the very classical embodiment of the spirit of triumph. So it's a stroke of post-classical genius to address their work to "the sullen," and a shrewd way of managing the expectations of a possibly cynical post-modern audience: the regal pace and transcendent beauty of their music brings a feeling of quiet reassurance. They're members of a popular group of modern classical composers with an integral ambient sensibility. On this transmission of Hearts of Space, reassuring neo-classical ambient for trying times, on a program called SOLEMN HOPE. Music is by A WINGED VICTORY FOR THE SULLEN, TERJE RYPDAL, BEN LUKAS BOYSEN, JÓHANN JÓHANNSSON, JEFF GREINKE, VOLKER BERTELMANN & DUSTIN O'HALLORAN, and SLOW MEADOW. [ view playlist ] [ view Flickr image gallery ] [ play 30 second MP3 promo ] Continue reading
Posted Feb 20, 2021 at hearts of space | news
Image
BELLS, BOWLS, and GONGS — charter members of the struck idiophone family of resonant percussion. BELLS originated in Neolithic China in the 3rd millennium BC. They were made of bronze, glass, ceramic, or minerals like quartz with a crystalline molecular structure. When formed into a circular cup shape and struck, bells produce a pitched tone and harmonics, which fade away slowly. Mechanical resonance gives bells their characteristic ringing sound. GONGS are another member of the resonant percussion family from East and Southeast Asia. Suspended gongs are flat circles that produce clouds of sound without a central pitch; bossed gongs have a raised center, and are tuned to produce pitched tones. BOWLS or more accurately bowl gongs, are both; they start as a flat circle like a gong, and are then bent into a bowl shape like a bell. They also produce a pitched tone and are often called singing bowls. So much for the physics — the real mystery is the metaphysics. For millennia, these simple instruments have been used for ritual and ceremony, religious services, meditation and contemplative experience. Today there's a quiet boom in subtle, psychoactive sound, with hundreds of dedicated artists creating "deep listening" concerts, "sound baths," and recordings. On this transmission of Hearts of Space, the wintry tones of bells, bowls and gongs, on a program called MYSTIC METALS 2. Music is by JARGUNA, HANS CHRISTIAN, KARMA MOFFET, SATORIO, SHAWN FEENEY, SCOTT LAWLOR, and THE LOVELY MOON. [ view playlist ] [ view Flickr image gallery ] [ play 30 second MP3 promo ] Continue reading
Posted Feb 13, 2021 at hearts of space | news
Image
In Part 1 of our posthumous retrospective of cellist DAVID DARLING called 'RESONANT DARK,' we focused on his groundbreaking early albums for the German ECM label. Darling told the story of his first session with ECM producer MANFRED EICHER, who set the agenda definitively by saying "I want you to go as deep as you can go." In ten albums from 1980 to 2000, they did just that, defining and setting a standard for darkly serious ambient chamber music. But there was other music in David Darling's heart. In the early 1990s, he began to pursue a more varied, romantic, even playful direction in recordings for other labels. Rather than the two day recording schedule at ECM, he took his time. Working with patient, supportive engineer/producers like MICKEY HOULIHAN and TOMMY SKARUPA, Darling achieved new heights of beauty in his solo recordings, collaborated generously with other artists, and broadened his appeal. Through it all, he continued to inspire, teaching and leading improvisation workshops for his non-profit organization Music For People, and working with spiritual teachers like AL HUANG, SYLVIA NAKKACH, and COLEMAN BARKS. On this transmission of Hearts of Space, we focus on David Darling's post-ECM recordings EIGHT STRING RELIGION, CELLO BLUE, GRATITUDE, HOMAGE TO KINDNESS, and his Grammy-winning PRAYER FOR COMPASSION. [ view playlist ] [ view Flickr image gallery ] [ play 30 second MP3 promo ] Continue reading
Posted Feb 6, 2021 at hearts of space | news
Image
The polar night…deep, still, and silent. As our world warms, it's punctuated by sounds of ice...melting, cracking and falling. Overhead the auroras paint the sky with ghostly green light, as charged particles from the sun interact with the earth's magnetic field. It's a vast, solemn environment that inspires ambient and electronic musicians to create vast, chilled soundscapes. On this transmission of HEARTS of SPACE, ambient nocturnes from the Arctic north, on a program called NORTHERN NIGHTS 2. Music is by JANNE HANHISUANTO, MATHIAS GRASSOW & MICHAEL BRÜCKNER, SEETYCHA, ERIK WØLLO, STORMLOOP, BIOSPHERE, RETINA.IT, and ILUITECH. [ view program page ] [ view Flickr image gallery ] [ play 30 second MP3 promo ] Continue reading
Posted Jan 29, 2021 at hearts of space | news
Image
The hypnotic pizzicato rhythm; the patient exploration of contemplative space; the ardent lyricism and emotional depth of the virtual string orchestra — these are hallmarks of the music of cellist DAVID DARLING, who left us at the beginning of 2021 after a long and exemplary life in music. When HOS launched our nationally syndicated program in 1983, David Darling was featured in program number one, and was already one of our core artists. Born in Indiana in 1941, he studied cello at Indiana State University, became the first cellist of the pioneering jazz/classical fusion ensemble THE WINTER CONSORT in 1970, and played principal cello in the Nashville Symphony. His 1980 solo debut on the respected German jazz label ECM began a twenty year creative relationship with producer MANFRED EICHER, and ten albums that set a standard for creative contemporary string recordings. In a unique career that extended over 50 years, David Darling distinguished himself as much more than a contemporary musician. His work as a music educator, contributions to humanitarian projects, and collaborations with poets and spiritual teachers, set an example of a musical life devoted to service and inspiration. In addition to his ECM recordings, Darling sought out collaborations from outside the world of contemporary jazz, resulting in many diverse and richly romantic recordings, which we'll cover in a second retrospective. On this transmission of Hearts of Space, the ECM recordings of DAVID DARLING, on a program called RESONANT DARK. [ view playlist ] [ view Flickr image gallery ] [ play 30 second MP3 promo ] Continue reading
Posted Jan 23, 2021 at hearts of space | news
Image
The forlorn, hypnotic sound of foghorns echoing over San Francisco Bay, recorded in 1981 by the pioneering environmental sound artist BILL FONTANA. It's an artifact of a bygone era: the fog horns are still there, but as an aid to navigation they've mostly been replaced by GPS. Fortunately, Fontana's work has now been memorialized in a deluxe CD edition from the Bay area New Music label Other Minds Records. It makes a lovely souvenir of foggy, hypothermic summer nights in San Francisco. As an atmospheric phenomenon, fog has been with us since the earth cooled enough for water vapor to condense into tiny droplets that float on air. For humans, fog reduces visibility and makes it difficult, even dangerous, to move around; on the plus side, fog creates subtle monochromatic dreamworlds of endless beauty and fascination for both visual artists and ambient musicians. On this transmission of Hearts of Space, chilled, soft-focus, atmospheric dreamworlds...on a program called WINTER FOG. Music is by BILL FONTANA, INGRAM MARSHALL, BRIAN ENO, JEFF GREINKE, MICHAEL BRÜCKNER, and ROBERT RICH. [ view playlist ] [ view Flickr image gallery ] [ play 30 second MP3 promo ] Continue reading
Posted Jan 16, 2021 at hearts of space | news
Image
This is our second retrospective of the music of Southern California ambient/minimalist composer HAROLD BUDD. Part 1 covered 1978 to 2006, when he announced his "retirement" at age 70. He wasn't serious. After a brief rest, he was more active than ever. Between then and his death at the end of 2020, he added 16 additional collaborations, soundtracks, and solo albums to his already large catalog. Early in his career, Budd rejected the ugly, dissonant sounds of the 20th century avant-garde, embraced traditional consonant tonality, and made it new: “In my music the focus has shifted to consonance as a thing in itself," he told The New York Times in 1987. "I hear an absolute whole life in consonant chords.” His classic "soft pedal" piano style, described as "yearning piano motifs and reverb-laden impressionism," developed and matured during his work with BRIAN ENO. After making his reputation in England, Budd returned to Los Angeles and started a second family in his 60's. While the early years had been about establishing his approach to meditative, atmospheric music, now he worked with sympatico English ambient guitarists who instinctively understood the aesthetics of his "poetic dreamworlds" and "esoteric reveries." Budd relaxed into his comfort zone, while expanding into film and TV scoring and chamber music. His career had a certain inverse symmetry: after abandoning academic classical music in the beginning, at the end he was writing for string quartets. On this transmission of Hearts of Space, our second HAROLD BUDD retrospective called TRANSLUCENT DRIFTS, featuring late solo works and collaborations with ROBIN GUTHRIE, CLIVE WRIGHT, and JOHN FOXX. [ view playlist ] [ view Flickr image gallery ] [ play 30 second MP3 promo ] Continue reading
Posted Jan 9, 2021 at hearts of space | news
Image
the Hearts of Space studio We don’t get that many inquiries about high resolution audio, but recently one of our subscribers asked us about the audio quality of current HoS streams and why we don't offer a "high-res" service. I'd been meaning to write it up anyway for HoS News, so here goes. It's unavoidably technical, but if you care about digital sound quality, most of the terms and concepts should be familiar. The national HoS program dates from 1983, which was the waning days of the analog audio era. So roughly the first 100 programs from 1983 to 1986 were produced on quarter inch analog tape. Master tapes in those days ran at 15 or 30 ips (inches per second), but we were forced to work at 7.5 ips because we were making 59:00 programs, not three or four minute songs, and a show had to fit on a standard 10.5" reel. The lower speed limited the ultra high frequency quality of our program masters slightly, but was perfectly acceptable for radio programs. Ironically, the low-end bass performance at 7.5ips was actually better than 30ips masters. Most of our source material came from LPs, occasionally from master tape copies direct from the artists. In those cases, if you could ignore surface noise from the LPs (I couldn't) the quality of the original sources was pretty good. When cassettes became popular, things got worse for a few years. Many of our new age titles had to be dubbed from high speed duplicated cassettes with limited bandwidth and dynamic range and significantly more noise. Nevertheless, with careful engineering, everything sounded "listenable." We got into digital as soon as it was practical, first using the Sony PCM-F1 digital recorder, and later the Sound Designer 2 computer program and its successor Pro Tools,... Continue reading
Posted Jan 2, 2021 at hearts of space | news
Image
We're flying over the north polar icecap — in winter, a dazzling wonderland of white and deep blue. It's a vast glacial world of snow and ice, fractal patterns shot through with veins of melting water. Ambient electronic music, with its chilled harmonies, slowly changing rhythm patterns and endless reverberant sound images, creates the perfect soundtrack for this spectacular landscape. In the polar night above the Arctic Circle, the winter sun never rises above the horizon; only the hypnotic ion curtains of the auroras relieve the darkness, while the sounds of moving water and breaking ice punctuate the solitude. It's a contemplative environment of sublime majesty and depth. On this transmission of Hearts of Space, a journey to the Arctic north, on a program called POLAR FLIGHT 2. Music is by ASCENDANT, YAGYA, BANCO DE GAIA, SIMON LOMAX, WINGS OF AN ANGEL, and EASYCHORD. [ view playlist ] [ view Flickr image gallery ] [ play 30 second MP3 promo ] Continue reading
Posted Jan 1, 2021 at hearts of space | news
Image
The revered ambient composer HAROLD BUDD was taken by the Covid-19 virus on December 8th 2020. This is the first of two retrospectives celebrating his life and his music. Who would have believed when it was written in 1972, that the delicate chamber music that begins this show was actually an act of defiance. "When I told people," says HAROLD BUDD, "that my idea was to make music that was as devastatingly pretty as possible, it was out-and-out politics." In fact, the California-born composer and ambient music pioneer has always been something of a contrarian. He got a late start in music, getting his degree in composition at the age of 36 at USC in Los Angeles. In the late 1960s he was loosely involved with a circle of Southern California minimalist and avant garde composers, absorbing influences from JOHN CAGE and MORTON FELDMAN, but also from jazz giants like PHAROAH SANDERS and JOHN COLTANE. He even wrote a piece for piano, harp, celeste, and topless female choir. Ah, yes. Those were the days. In 1970 he began teaching at the California Institute of the Arts. He left six years later after meeting someone who would change his life: English producer, musician and theorist BRIAN ENO. Years later Budd told me with his typical sly wit: "The problem with teaching was that you had to listen to so much bad music." Eno signed Budd to his new OBSCURE RECORDS label in 1976. Budd and Eno went on to create several influential and widely enjoyed albums — foundation stones of the ambient genre, including THE PLATEAUX OF MIRROR and THE PEARL. Budd's early works had neo-classical titles, like Madrigals of the Rose Angel and The Pavilion of Dreams. In addition to his musical gifts, he had an ear for language and... Continue reading
Posted Dec 26, 2020 at hearts of space | news
Image
DECEMBER 2020 IS THE 35th ANNIVERSARY of the first Hearts of Space program created by our guest producer for western classical and sacred spacemusic, ELLEN HOLMES — a labor of love, dedication and stamina that continues to bring us experiences of sublime beauty and depth. Thank you, Ellen. We are all in your debt. On this winter holiday transmission of Hearts of Space, Ellen brings together sacred choral and instrumental sounds of love, caring and compassion, on a program called CARITAS. The Latin word translates as charity, and is considered the highest of Christian virtues: the divine love of God, as well as the love of one's neighbor and oneself. The program includes Anonymous early sacred chants: Baroque and Classical choral gems by MARC-ANTOINE CHARPENTIER, WOLFGANG AMADEUS MOZART, CHARLES GOUNOD, and FRANZ SCHUBERT, and sacred choral and classical instrumentals by contemporary composers JOHN TAVENER, IVER KLEIVE, GEOFFREY BURGON, JOHN RUTTER and PATRICK HAWES. Holiday sounds of love, caring and compassion: CARITAS...on this transmission...of Hearts of Space. [ view playlist ] [ view Flickr image gallery ] [ play 30 second MP3 promo ] Continue reading
Posted Dec 19, 2020 at hearts of space | news
Image
Quick quiz: what's one of the oldest instruments in the world, heard in musical cultures in Asia, Africa, Europe, the Middle East and the Americas, and revered by folk, classical and contemporary musicians alike? Here's a hint: you can think of it as a large guitar, or a small piano. Give up? It's the harp — a descendant of the Persian chang and the Sumerian lyre — still with us after four thousand years. With tones ranging from seductively soft and warm to bright and bell-like, scales from diatonic to chromatic, and now acoustic and electric versions, the harp is both the original therapeutic instrument, and a vehicle for avant-garde experimentation. Now that is range. On this transmission of HEARTS of SPACE — folk, classical and contemporary music for acoustic and electric harp, on a program called THE ETERNAL HARP. Music is by LISA LYNNE & ARYEH FRANKFURTER, TRINE OPSAHL, LAVINIA MEIJER, CECILIA CHAILLY, SOMEI SATOH, and from Belgium ECHO COLLECTIVE. [ view playlist ] [ view Flickr image gallery ] [ play 30 second MP3 promo ] Continue reading
Posted Dec 11, 2020 at hearts of space | news