This is drSpace's Typepad Profile.
Join Typepad and start following drSpace's activity
Join Now!
Already a member? Sign In
drSpace
somewhere in space
Hearts of Space radio and online music service producer
Recent Activity
Image
The forlorn, hypnotic sound of foghorns echoing over San Francisco Bay, recorded in 1981 by the pioneering environmental sound artist BILL FONTANA. It's an artifact of a bygone era: the fog horns are still there, but as an aid to navigation they've mostly been replaced by GPS. Fortunately, Fontana's work has now been memorialized in a deluxe CD edition from the Bay area New Music label Other Minds Records. It makes a lovely souvenir of foggy, hypothermic summer nights in San Francisco. As an atmospheric phenomenon, fog has been with us since the earth cooled enough for water vapor to condense into tiny droplets that float on air. For humans, fog reduces visibility and makes it difficult, even dangerous, to move around; on the plus side, fog creates subtle monochromatic dreamworlds of endless beauty and fascination for both visual artists and ambient musicians. On this transmission of Hearts of Space, chilled, soft-focus, atmospheric dreamworlds...on a program called WINTER FOG. Music is by BILL FONTANA, INGRAM MARSHALL, BRIAN ENO, JEFF GREINKE, MICHAEL BRÜCKNER, and ROBERT RICH. [ view playlist ] [ view Flickr image gallery ] [ play 30 second MP3 promo ] Continue reading
Posted yesterday at hearts of space | news
Image
This is our second retrospective of the music of Southern California ambient/minimalist composer HAROLD BUDD. Part 1 covered 1978 to 2006, when he announced his "retirement" at age 70. He wasn't serious. After a brief rest, he was more active than ever. Between then and his death at the end of 2020, he added 16 additional collaborations, soundtracks, and solo albums to his already large catalog. Early in his career, Budd rejected the ugly, dissonant sounds of the 20th century avant-garde, embraced traditional consonant tonality, and made it new: “In my music the focus has shifted to consonance as a thing in itself," he told The New York Times in 1987. "I hear an absolute whole life in consonant chords.” His classic "soft pedal" piano style, described as "yearning piano motifs and reverb-laden impressionism," developed and matured during his work with BRIAN ENO. After making his reputation in England, Budd returned to Los Angeles and started a second family in his 60's. While the early years had been about establishing his approach to meditative, atmospheric music, now he worked with sympatico English ambient guitarists who instinctively understood the aesthetics of his "poetic dreamworlds" and "esoteric reveries." Budd relaxed into his comfort zone, while expanding into film and TV scoring and chamber music. His career had a certain inverse symmetry: after abandoning academic classical music in the beginning, at the end he was writing for string quartets. On this transmission of Hearts of Space, our second HAROLD BUDD retrospective called TRANSLUCENT DRIFTS, featuring late solo works and collaborations with ROBIN GUTHRIE, CLIVE WRIGHT, and JOHN FOXX. [ view playlist ] [ view Flickr image gallery ] [ play 30 second MP3 promo ] Continue reading
Posted Jan 9, 2021 at hearts of space | news
Image
the Hearts of Space studio We don’t get that many inquiries about high resolution audio, but recently one of our subscribers asked us about the audio quality of current HoS streams and why we don't offer a "high-res" service. I'd been meaning to write it up anyway for HoS News, so here goes. It's unavoidably technical, but if you care about digital sound quality, most of the terms and concepts should be familiar. The national HoS program dates from 1983, which was the waning days of the analog audio era. So roughly the first 100 programs from 1983 to 1986 were produced on quarter inch analog tape. Master tapes in those days ran at 15 or 30 ips (inches per second), but we were forced to work at 7.5 ips because we were making 59:00 programs, not three or four minute songs, and a show had to fit on a standard 10.5" reel. The lower speed limited the ultra high frequency quality of our program masters slightly, but was perfectly acceptable for radio programs. Ironically, the low-end bass performance at 7.5ips was actually better than 30ips masters. Most of our source material came from LPs, occasionally from master tape copies direct from the artists. In those cases, if you could ignore surface noise from the LPs (I couldn't) the quality of the original sources was pretty good. When cassettes became popular, things got worse for a few years. Many of our new age titles had to be dubbed from high speed duplicated cassettes with limited bandwidth and dynamic range and significantly more noise. Nevertheless, with careful engineering, everything sounded "listenable." We got into digital as soon as it was practical, first using the Sony PCM-F1 digital recorder, and later the Sound Designer 2 computer program and its successor Pro Tools,... Continue reading
Posted Jan 2, 2021 at hearts of space | news
Image
We're flying over the north polar icecap — in winter, a dazzling wonderland of white and deep blue. It's a vast glacial world of snow and ice, fractal patterns shot through with veins of melting water. Ambient electronic music, with its chilled harmonies, slowly changing rhythm patterns and endless reverberant sound images, creates the perfect soundtrack for this spectacular landscape. In the polar night above the Arctic Circle, the winter sun never rises above the horizon; only the hypnotic ion curtains of the auroras relieve the darkness, while the sounds of moving water and breaking ice punctuate the solitude. It's a contemplative environment of sublime majesty and depth. On this transmission of Hearts of Space, a journey to the Arctic north, on a program called POLAR FLIGHT 2. Music is by ASCENDANT, YAGYA, BANCO DE GAIA, SIMON LOMAX, WINGS OF AN ANGEL, and EASYCHORD. [ view playlist ] [ view Flickr image gallery ] [ play 30 second MP3 promo ] Continue reading
Posted Jan 1, 2021 at hearts of space | news
Image
The revered ambient composer HAROLD BUDD was taken by the Covid-19 virus on December 8th 2020. This is the first of two retrospectives celebrating his life and his music. Who would have believed when it was written in 1972, that the delicate chamber music that begins this show was actually an act of defiance. "When I told people," says HAROLD BUDD, "that my idea was to make music that was as devastatingly pretty as possible, it was out-and-out politics." In fact, the California-born composer and ambient music pioneer has always been something of a contrarian. He got a late start in music, getting his degree in composition at the age of 36 at USC in Los Angeles. In the late 1960s he was loosely involved with a circle of Southern California minimalist and avant garde composers, absorbing influences from JOHN CAGE and MORTON FELDMAN, but also from jazz giants like PHAROAH SANDERS and JOHN COLTANE. He even wrote a piece for piano, harp, celeste, and topless female choir. Ah, yes. Those were the days. In 1970 he began teaching at the California Institute of the Arts. He left six years later after meeting someone who would change his life: English producer, musician and theorist BRIAN ENO. Years later Budd told me with his typical sly wit: "The problem with teaching was that you had to listen to so much bad music." Eno signed Budd to his new OBSCURE RECORDS label in 1976. Budd and Eno went on to create several influential and widely enjoyed albums — foundation stones of the ambient genre, including THE PLATEAUX OF MIRROR and THE PEARL. Budd's early works had neo-classical titles, like Madrigals of the Rose Angel and The Pavilion of Dreams. In addition to his musical gifts, he had an ear for language and... Continue reading
Posted Dec 26, 2020 at hearts of space | news
Image
DECEMBER 2020 IS THE 35th ANNIVERSARY of the first Hearts of Space program created by our guest producer for western classical and sacred spacemusic, ELLEN HOLMES — a labor of love, dedication and stamina that continues to bring us experiences of sublime beauty and depth. Thank you, Ellen. We are all in your debt. On this winter holiday transmission of Hearts of Space, Ellen brings together sacred choral and instrumental sounds of love, caring and compassion, on a program called CARITAS. The Latin word translates as charity, and is considered the highest of Christian virtues: the divine love of God, as well as the love of one's neighbor and oneself. The program includes Anonymous early sacred chants: Baroque and Classical choral gems by MARC-ANTOINE CHARPENTIER, WOLFGANG AMADEUS MOZART, CHARLES GOUNOD, and FRANZ SCHUBERT, and sacred choral and classical instrumentals by contemporary composers JOHN TAVENER, IVER KLEIVE, GEOFFREY BURGON, JOHN RUTTER and PATRICK HAWES. Holiday sounds of love, caring and compassion: CARITAS...on this transmission...of Hearts of Space. [ view playlist ] [ view Flickr image gallery ] [ play 30 second MP3 promo ] Continue reading
Posted Dec 19, 2020 at hearts of space | news
Image
Quick quiz: what's one of the oldest instruments in the world, heard in musical cultures in Asia, Africa, Europe, the Middle East and the Americas, and revered by folk, classical and contemporary musicians alike? Here's a hint: you can think of it as a large guitar, or a small piano. Give up? It's the harp — a descendant of the Persian chang and the Sumerian lyre — still with us after four thousand years. With tones ranging from seductively soft and warm to bright and bell-like, scales from diatonic to chromatic, and now acoustic and electric versions, the harp is both the original therapeutic instrument, and a vehicle for avant-garde experimentation. Now that is range. On this transmission of HEARTS of SPACE — folk, classical and contemporary music for acoustic and electric harp, on a program called THE ETERNAL HARP. Music is by LISA LYNNE & ARYEH FRANKFURTER, TRINE OPSAHL, LAVINIA MEIJER, CECILIA CHAILLY, SOMEI SATOH, and from Belgium ECHO COLLECTIVE. [ view playlist ] [ view Flickr image gallery ] [ play 30 second MP3 promo ] Continue reading
Posted Dec 11, 2020 at hearts of space | news
Image
Just over a hundred years ago, English composer GUSTAV HOLST created the hugely popular orchestral suite THE PLANETS. He used conventional acoustic instruments. Just think of what he'd have done with the electronic instruments of today. In fact, if you give a musician a synth the odds are they'll use it to create some of the cosmic brand of ambient we like to call "spacemusic." It's been that way since the earliest days of electronic music. The cool, abstract, non-material tones of electronic instruments were intuitively associated with the moon, the planets, the stars and the entire cosmic panorama. Cosmic music led to another discovery: rhythm created by electronic tones generated by programmable machines called sequencers, instead of drums. Why? Because drums grounded the music in the physical world, and tethered the imagery of the music to acoustic space. The goal was the infinite release and infinite freedom...of infinite space. On this transmission of Hearts of Space, another cosmic electronic journey across the starfields to distant galaxies, on a program called COSMIC ELECTRONIC 2. Music is by STARTERRA, EXTRAWORLD, TRANSPONDER, ASC, OVNIMOON, and SYNC24. [ view playlist ] [ view Flickr image gallery ] [ play 30 second MP3 promo ] Continue reading
Posted Dec 5, 2020 at hearts of space | news
Image
In a normal year, the autumn season brings music with smoky timbres, dissonant harmonies, descending progressions, and gentle melancholy. This year we have to include the emotions that accompany a devastating global disease, isolation, and loss. We're challenged to reach into our battered hearts and summon up additional generosity, to give thanks for what we have. Now the days grow short, the nights grow long, and a chill descends on the land as the northern hemisphere slowly tilts away from the sun. It's a time for quiet reflection and the cultivation of inner strength to confront the challenges ahead. On this transmission of Hearts of Space, ambient, chamber and sacred music for a haunted autumn, on a program called RECESSION 2. Music is by KEVIN KELLER, ÓLAFUR ARNALDS, DAVID DARLING, GUNNARD DOBOZE, and MAX RICHTER. [ view playlist ] [ view Flickr image gallery ] [ play 30 second MP3 promo ] Continue reading
Posted Nov 28, 2020 at hearts of space | news
Image
A classic piece of electronic spacemusic from France by JEAN-MICHEL JARRE. With just a few notes, it creates a whole world of mystery and imagination. Slow, deep, romantic and sublime, it invites us into a place that's unknown and unpredictable, yet alluring. It's true that all good music takes you away, but since the 1970s artists have been using electronic tools to craft a sound that takes you to places far beyond the reach of ordinary music. Dark ambient electronics have become a vehicle...for transport to deep virtual worlds and exotic environments. On this transmission of Hearts of Space, a journey on the dark ambient spaceways, on a program called MYSTERIOSO. Music is by JEAN MICHEL JARRE, A PRODUCE & LOREN NERELL, PAUL ELLIS, MEG BOWLES, RICHARD BONE, ERIK WOLLO, KIT WATKINS, and ANDREW LAHIFF. [ view playlist ] [ view Flickr image gallery ] [ play 30 second MP3 promo ] Continue reading
Posted Nov 20, 2020 at hearts of space | news
Image
The evolution of the pianoforte into the modern piano since the 18th century created an artistic platform for both players and composers. By the 1970s solo piano recordings emerged as a vehicle for personal expression and statements of musical identity. Ubiquitous and flexible, the piano supported virtuosity and musical complexity as readily as simplicity and sentimentality. Recordings ranged from the intense improvised outpourings of KEITH JARRETT and the folk impressionism of GEORGE WINSTON, to the "generative music" algorithms of BRIAN ENO. Today the solo piano medium can be truly personal, while on a deeper level, quiet, spacious, serene ambient music addresses a collective psychological need for relief from the tension and intensity of daily life. That still leaves room for many different approaches. Along with typical new age sweetness and trancey minimalist repetition, we find artists attracted to dark worlds, somber tone colors, and dissonant harmonies, with sophisticated production techniques that add textural complexity and intrigue to the conventional sound of the acoustic piano. As we transit the house of Scorpio in this plague year 2020 transmission of Hearts of Space...a darktime excursion, on a program called SCORPIANO. Music is by JILL TRACY, MATTHEW LABARGE, DAVID NORLAND, and BRUNO SANFILIPPO. [ view playlist ] [ view Flickr image gallery ] [ play 30 second MP3 promo ] Continue reading
Posted Nov 14, 2020 at hearts of space | news
Image
In the cooling, darkening months of autumn, time seems to slow in the natural world. The leaves change color, wither and fade, while the animals are busy stocking up for the winter to come. For humans, this year is a somber season. In a time of pandemic, we're challenged to adapt to protective measures, and carry on with normal life in abnormal times. The music of the season features downward progressions and complex harmonies. On this transmission of Hearts of Space, a dark ambient autumn journey, on a program called DESCENDING DARK 3. Music by JEFF PEARCE, JEFF GREINKE, HOLLAN HOLMES, ERIK WØLLO & MICHAEL STEARNS, SAM ROSENTHAL, AL GROMER KHAN, ROBERT RICH, NIK PARKIN, and PATRICK O'HEARN. [ view playlist ] [ view Flickr image gallery ] [ play 30 second MP3 promo ] Continue reading
Posted Nov 7, 2020 at hearts of space | news
Image
In troubled times, when dark forces disrupt our lives and challenge our communities, we find solace in the music of lamentation. It's an age-old expression of pain, grief and heartache—a step on the path to catharsis and healing. On this transmission of Hearts of Space, Renaissance, Baroque, folk and contemporary songs of loss, longing, and lamentation, on a program from guest producer ELLEN HOLMES called LAMENTO 4. Music is by PALESTRINA, ZELENKA, MORAGO, ISAAC, CORREA de ARAUXO and BRITTEN, performed by JORDI SAVALL & HESPERION 21 and MATTHEW BARLEY, plus folk and traditional songs by CHARLES STANFORD, THE KRONOS QUARTET, and NIEL GOW, and contemporary instrumentals by PATRICK HAWES, BARRINGTON PHELOUNG, ROSS EDWARDS, and MAX RICHTER. [ view playlist ] [ view Flickr image gallery ] [ play 30 second MP3 promo ] Continue reading
Posted Oct 31, 2020 at hearts of space | news
Image
As we enter the astrological house of Scorpio, here in the northern hemisphere the light is waning, the natural world is withering, and hidden realms are emerging from the shadows. It's a time for music of dissonant harmonies, dark spaces and strange worlds. I'm STEPHEN HILL and on this transmission of Hearts of Space, a dark autumn journey called THE TWILIGHT ZONE. The title, of course, was made famous by the 1959 science fiction TV series written, produced and hosted by ROD SERLING, featuring stories of the futuristic, the paranormal and the supernatural. My introductions to Hearts of Space are too often compared to Rod Serling's. Thank you, but have you actually listened to a TWILIGHT ZONE intro lately? Sorry, no way. Music is by TIM STORY & ROEDELIUS, KEVIN KELLER, BRUNO SANFILIPPO, MICHAEL JON FINK, JEFF GREINKE, ROBERT RICH, THOMAS NEWMAN & RICK COX, and DWIGHT ASHLEY. [ view playlist ] [ view Flickr image gallery ] [ play 30 second MP3 promo ] Continue reading
Posted Oct 23, 2020 at hearts of space | news
Image
The gentle tones of the Native American cedar flute have propagated far beyond their origin — a rare case of a humble ethnic instrument succeeding on natural charm and sonic appeal. Resurrected from decades of cultural neglect by native musicians in the mid 20th century, it proved to be a versatile and satisfying instrument for both amateur and professional musicians. We like to revisit it in the fall, when its pentatonic minor scale seems to magically express the deepening energy and complex colors of the season. On this transmission of Hearts of Space, a Southwest autumn journey featuring the Native American flute called MYSTIC CANYONS. Music is by COYOTE OLDMAN, JONN SERRIE & GARY STROUTSOS, SCOTT AUGUST, JOHNNY WHITEHORSE, JAMES MARIENTHAL, SHERRY FINZER, JOHN HULING, and KENNETH HOOPER. [ view playlist ] [ view Flickr image gallery ] [ play 30 second MP3 promo ] Continue reading
Posted Oct 17, 2020 at hearts of space | news
Image
The traditions of sacred music and contemplative song are found in almost every culture on earth. They bring beauty, peace, and emotional fulfillment to millions. Since the mid 20th century, the sacred sounds of exotic world cultures have become increasingly popular with western listeners, even though they sound nothing like western sacred music. Despite our increasingly secular culture, sacred song maintains a special place in our holiday celebrations, and contemplative music provides a much-needed balm for battered spirits. On this transmission of Hearts of Space, deep song, devotional chant, sacred hymns, and contemplative instrumentals from Spain, the Middle East and India, on a program called SACRED SONGS 2. Music is by ADAM HURST, YUVAL RON & flamenco singer ESTRELLA MORENTE, MICHEL BANABILA, AZAM ALI & LOGA RAMIN TORKIAN, DEVA PREMAL, and SERENA GABRIEL & STEVE ROACH. [ view playlist ] [ view Flickr image gallery ] [ play 30 second MP3 promo ] Continue reading
Posted Oct 10, 2020 at hearts of space | news
Image
THE SUN begins its long withdrawal from the northern hemisphere after the summer solstice in June. After the autumn equinox in September, the transition seems to accelerate. The days grow shorter, the nights grow longer, and the temperature cools, while the natural world changes color and prepares for the winter to come. Since medieval times we've called this season "fall." The word comes from Middle English, with Old English and Old German roots. Falling implies movement downward, and in autumn declining solar energy brings a feeling of descending or falling into the season. In music it's marked by slowing tempos, descending chord progressions, darkening timbres, and wistful, even melancholy emotions. On this transmission of Hearts of Space, we descend into the autumn soundscape, on a program called FALLING. Music is by DAVID DARLING, JOEP BEVING, CHRISTOPHER TIGNOR, HAMMOCK, LUDOVICO EINAUDI, and TOM EATON. [ view program page ] [ view Flickr image gallery ] [ play 30 second MP3 promo ] Continue reading
Posted Oct 2, 2020 at hearts of space | news
Image
The theory and practice of Indo-Tibetan Buddhist meditation seem ideally suited to confronting the stressful challenges we're now living through in the wake of the Covid-19 pandemic. Through a form of meditation called śamatha or "single-pointed attention," the meditator achieves vipaśyanā — in English vipassana or insight — "seeing into the nature of things." In Sanskrit, śamatha means "tranquility of mind," often called "calm abiding." Śamatha has five progressive stages: stable attention, powerful mindfulness, joy, tranquility, and finally, equanimity. The practice of calm abiding leads to insight. Without any formal connection to Buddhist meditation but because of common goals, we can find śamatha in the deeper, quieter, more contemplative forms of ambient music. On this transmission of Hearts of Space, a Buddhist-inspired ambient meditation, on a program called CALM ABIDING. Music is by ROBERT RICH, SPUNTIC, SAM ROSENTHAL & JARGUNA, NUMINA & ZERO OHMS, and KEITH BERRY. [ view playlist ] [ view Flickr image gallery ] [ play 30 second MP3 promo ] Continue reading
Posted Sep 26, 2020 at hearts of space | news
Image
Twice a year, we pass a point of balance and equilibrium in the progression of the seasons. Our planet reaches the place in its celestial journey where the center of the sun rises and sets directly over the equator, and day and night are of approximately equal length everywhere on earth. We call these times the equinox from the Latin for "equal night." A less common but possibly more correct name is equilux or "equal light." The September equinox marks the beginning of the new season: autumn, and the time of harvest festivals in the northern hemisphere. On this transmission of Hearts of Space, calm and balanced acoustic ambient for the seasonal transition, on a program called EQUILUX. Music is by PETER BRODERICK, LUDOVICO EINAUDI, FEDERICO ALBANESE, TOM EATON, FLOW, CARL WEINGARTEN & CATHERINE MARIE CHARLTON, GREG HAINES, A WINGED VICTORY FOR THE SULLEN, and ENZO. [ view playlist ] [ view Flickr image gallery ] [ play 30 second MP3 promo ] Continue reading
Posted Sep 19, 2020 at hearts of space | news
Image
The history of Jamaican Dub music is rich and fascinating. Dub grew out of reggae in the 1960s, and evolved well beyond its popular parent. It was a studio craft where producers created instrumental remixes of reggae tracks by removing the vocals, adding echo, reverb and delay, and dubbing in new ambient sounds. Essentially, Dub was an early form of popular electronic music. If you think all this had something to do with cannabis, you'd be understating the case. In a 1982 essay, LUKE EHRLICH said: "With dub, Jamaican music spaced out completely. If reggae is Africa in the New World, then dub must be Africa on the moon; it's the psychedelic music I expected to hear in the 1960s...and didn't. The bass and drums conjure up a dark, vast musical portrait of outer space, with sounds suspended like glowing planets or the fragments of instruments careening by, leaving trails like comets and meteors." Dub was a natural link to later electronic genres like techno, ambient, trip hop and electronic dance music. On this transmission of Hearts of Space, the trancey beats of Jamaican Dub and its electronic descendants, on a program from guest producer DAVID J. EGAN called DEEP DUB. Music is by JAH WOBBLE & MARCONI UNION, ORKUS, FINGERS IN THE NOISE, ECHO GRID, PURL & DEFLEKTION, LOSCIL, and MOTIONFIELD. [ view program page ] [ view Flickr image gallery ] [ play 30 second MP3 promo ] Continue reading
Posted Sep 11, 2020 at hearts of space | news
Image
Maybe it was just a coincidence, a timely convergence, but the era of space exploration that began in the 1960s was also a formative decade for electronic music. At the time, German experimental composer KARLHEINZ STOCKHAUSEN observed that there was a natural relationship between his electronic music and images of cosmic space. Maybe it was the drugs, but it seemed right. In Germany, the late 1960s saw the rise of the "Kozmik Musik" genre; electronic nebulae blossomed all over Europe and the English speaking countries; SUN RA toured the world and played his own brand of Afro-cosmic funk, while JOHN COLTRANE and his wife ALICE released the album COSMIC MUSIC. In the 1970's the COSMIC COURIERS record label was established, PROGRESSIVE ROCK went cosmic and became SPACE ROCK, BRIAN ENO invented Ambient, and PINK FLOYD became the biggest selling band in the world after Dark Side of the Moon. It was Good Times for space fans. Today, electronic spacemusic is an established genre with a nice article in Wikipedia and a steady stream of significant new music from masters of the craft. On this transmission of Hearts of Space, a classic journey in the electronic starfields, on a program called MASTERS OF SPACE. Music is by ERIK WØLLO & MICHAEL STEARNS, DAVID HELPLING & JON JENKINS, JON DURANT & ROBERT JÜRJENDAL, PHILLIP WILKERSON, and JEFF GREINKE. [ view playlist ] [ view Flickr image gallery ] [ play 30 second MP3 promo ] Continue reading
Posted Sep 5, 2020 at hearts of space | news
Image
In stressful times, we seek the comfort of the familiar, the predictable, the tried and true. And in music, that often means returning to the joys and pleasures of the acoustic guitar. It's not just the foundation of what JOHN FAHEY memorably called "American primitive guitar;" in addition to its role accompanying singers, as a solo instrument it's a rich vehicle for personal expression, creative innovation, and contemplative immersion. On this transmission of Hearts of Space, we touch all those possibilities, on a program called SIX STRING UNIVERSE. Music is by CHRIS HAUGEN, FLOW, ALEX DE GRASSI, RICHARD OSBORNE, MATTHEW MONTFORT, and CLAES NILSSON. [ view playlist ] [ view Flickr image gallery ] [ play 30 second MP3 promo ] Continue reading
Posted Aug 29, 2020 at hearts of space | news
Image
Let's talk about electronic music. As with acoustic instruments, we have freedom of expression with the core musical variables: melody, rhythm, tempo, and harmony. But we've gained the ability to create the tone, the timbre, the character, and even the spatial dimension of the electronic sound. In fact, the space or ambience of the sound becomes a fundamental artistic choice. Electronic music can create "soundscapes"—immersive images of virtual environments. Unlike the literal sound images of acoustic instruments, these electronic images can be deliberately amorphous...boundless...endless...unlimited. They can imply vast, fluid, diffuse, virtual spaces, whose dimensions are perceptually infinite. We can even make this quality the subject of the music, and call it "spacemusic"—a descriptive term that arose organically in the early days of popular electronic music. Today, ambient-electronic artists are creating sonic images of infinity—endless virtual spaces we can expand into, bathe in, savor, and explore. On this transmission of Hearts of Space, the quest for unlimited spaces in electronic sound, on a program called VISIONS OF INFINITY. Music is by DEEPSPACE, STEVE ROACH, KEVIN BRAHENY FORTUNE, MAX CORBACHO, and JEFF PEARCE. [ view playlist ] [ view Flickr image gallery ] [ play 30 second MP3 promo ] Continue reading
Posted Aug 22, 2020 at hearts of space | news
Image
Let's hear it for The Sun, ladies and gentlemen. It's impossible to think of anything more important—to our very existence, our history, our evolution, and our future as a species. So it's a big subject: the sun is responsible for super-basic stuff like day and night, the year, the weather, and the climate. It's the key to almost all life on earth, the source of all our energy (one way or another), the key ingredient in everything we eat, and the indispensable element in our vacations. I mean, who wants to vacation in the rain? Astronomically speaking, the sun is our home star, a member of the "yellow dwarf" class. It's 4.6 billion years old, over a hundred times bigger in diameter than earth, and weighs 330,000 times as much, despite being 98% hydrogen and helium—two of the lightest materials in existence. The sun is a bright sphere of superheated plasma; at its core is a nuclear furnace, where fusion of hydrogen atoms creates temperatures of almost 30 million degrees Fahrenheit, while the surface of the sun is a relatively balmy 10,000 degrees. We're 93 million miles away, and it still feels hot! The sun has been central to many human cultures and religions since prehistoric times. It's been worshipped as a deity and celebrated in myth, art and literature, especially in ancient Egypt. Those days are gone, but ambient electronic artists are still inspired by it. On this transmission of Hearts of Space...a tribute to the sun and its season, on a program called HELIOS. Music is by SOLAR FIELDS, AES DANA, STEVE ROACH, ISHQ, ALPHA WAVE MOVEMENT, ERIC WØLLO, MAX CORBACHO, and HOLLAN HOLMES. [ view playlist ] [ view Flickr image gallery ] [ play 30 second MP3 promo ] Continue reading
Posted Aug 14, 2020 at hearts of space | news
Image
Centuries ago, a music emerged out of the world's deserts and tribal cultures. It was built on trance-like rhythms and the most primitive instruments: flutes, rattles, and drums. Against all odds, in the late 20th century elements of this ancient indigenous music were embraced by electronic musicians searching for an earthy, vital sound to balance the dematerialized tones of electronic instruments, and ground the atmospheric soundscapes of ambient. Their quest led to a hybrid electro-acoustic genre originally called "techno-tribal" and later "tribal ambient." In retrospect, it was part of a wider movement ethno-botanist TERENCE McKENNA famously termed The Archaic Revival. Why would a sophisticated, technologically advanced culture want to revive an ancient, supposedly primitive one? In an era where our experience is increasingly mediated, artificial, and virtual — we seek authenticity, direct experience, and a deeper connection to our environment, our history, and our inner worlds. On this transmission of Hearts of Space, ambient electronics meet flutes, rattles, drums, and drones, on a journey across the desert mesas, wind-blown dunes, and rocky plains of the tribal ambient soundscape called TECHNO-TRIBAL. [ view playlist ] [ view Flickr image gallery ] [ play 30 second MP3 promo ] Continue reading
Posted Aug 8, 2020 at hearts of space | news