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somewhere in space
Hearts of Space radio and online music service producer
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As we enter the astrological house of Scorpio, here in the northern hemisphere the light is waning, the natural world is withering, and hidden realms are emerging from the shadows. It's a time for music of dissonant harmonies, dark spaces and strange worlds. I'm STEPHEN HILL and on this transmission of Hearts of Space, a dark autumn journey called THE TWILIGHT ZONE. The title, of course, was made famous by the 1959 science fiction TV series written, produced and hosted by ROD SERLING, featuring stories of the futuristic, the paranormal and the supernatural. My introductions to Hearts of Space are too often compared to Rod Serling's. Thank you, but have you actually listened to a TWILIGHT ZONE intro lately? Sorry, no way. Music is by TIM STORY & ROEDELIUS, KEVIN KELLER, BRUNO SANFILIPPO, MICHAEL JON FINK, JEFF GREINKE, ROBERT RICH, THOMAS NEWMAN & RICK COX, and DWIGHT ASHLEY. [ view playlist ] [ view Flickr image gallery ] [ play 30 second MP3 promo ] Continue reading
Posted 7 days ago at hearts of space | news
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The gentle tones of the Native American cedar flute have propagated far beyond their origin — a rare case of a humble ethnic instrument succeeding on natural charm and sonic appeal. Resurrected from decades of cultural neglect by native musicians in the mid 20th century, it proved to be a versatile and satisfying instrument for both amateur and professional musicians. We like to revisit it in the fall, when its pentatonic minor scale seems to magically express the deepening energy and complex colors of the season. On this transmission of Hearts of Space, a Southwest autumn journey featuring the Native American flute called MYSTIC CANYONS. Music is by COYOTE OLDMAN, JONN SERRIE & GARY STROUTSOS, SCOTT AUGUST, JOHNNY WHITEHORSE, JAMES MARIENTHAL, SHERRY FINZER, JOHN HULING, and KENNETH HOOPER. [ view playlist ] [ view Flickr image gallery ] [ play 30 second MP3 promo ] Continue reading
Posted Oct 17, 2020 at hearts of space | news
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The traditions of sacred music and contemplative song are found in almost every culture on earth. They bring beauty, peace, and emotional fulfillment to millions. Since the mid 20th century, the sacred sounds of exotic world cultures have become increasingly popular with western listeners, even though they sound nothing like western sacred music. Despite our increasingly secular culture, sacred song maintains a special place in our holiday celebrations, and contemplative music provides a much-needed balm for battered spirits. On this transmission of Hearts of Space, deep song, devotional chant, sacred hymns, and contemplative instrumentals from Spain, the Middle East and India, on a program called SACRED SONGS 2. Music is by ADAM HURST, YUVAL RON & flamenco singer ESTRELLA MORENTE, MICHEL BANABILA, AZAM ALI & LOGA RAMIN TORKIAN, DEVA PREMAL, and SERENA GABRIEL & STEVE ROACH. [ view playlist ] [ view Flickr image gallery ] [ play 30 second MP3 promo ] Continue reading
Posted Oct 10, 2020 at hearts of space | news
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THE SUN begins its long withdrawal from the northern hemisphere after the summer solstice in June. After the autumn equinox in September, the transition seems to accelerate. The days grow shorter, the nights grow longer, and the temperature cools, while the natural world changes color and prepares for the winter to come. Since medieval times we've called this season "fall." The word comes from Middle English, with Old English and Old German roots. Falling implies movement downward, and in autumn declining solar energy brings a feeling of descending or falling into the season. In music it's marked by slowing tempos, descending chord progressions, darkening timbres, and wistful, even melancholy emotions. On this transmission of Hearts of Space, we descend into the autumn soundscape, on a program called FALLING. Music is by DAVID DARLING, JOEP BEVING, CHRISTOPHER TIGNOR, HAMMOCK, LUDOVICO EINAUDI, and TOM EATON. [ view program page ] [ view Flickr image gallery ] [ play 30 second MP3 promo ] Continue reading
Posted Oct 2, 2020 at hearts of space | news
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The theory and practice of Indo-Tibetan Buddhist meditation seem ideally suited to confronting the stressful challenges we're now living through in the wake of the Covid-19 pandemic. Through a form of meditation called śamatha or "single-pointed attention," the meditator achieves vipaśyanā — in English vipassana or insight — "seeing into the nature of things." In Sanskrit, śamatha means "tranquility of mind," often called "calm abiding." Śamatha has five progressive stages: stable attention, powerful mindfulness, joy, tranquility, and finally, equanimity. The practice of calm abiding leads to insight. Without any formal connection to Buddhist meditation but because of common goals, we can find śamatha in the deeper, quieter, more contemplative forms of ambient music. On this transmission of Hearts of Space, a Buddhist-inspired ambient meditation, on a program called CALM ABIDING. Music is by ROBERT RICH, SPUNTIC, SAM ROSENTHAL & JARGUNA, NUMINA & ZERO OHMS, and KEITH BERRY. [ view playlist ] [ view Flickr image gallery ] [ play 30 second MP3 promo ] Continue reading
Posted Sep 26, 2020 at hearts of space | news
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Twice a year, we pass a point of balance and equilibrium in the progression of the seasons. Our planet reaches the place in its celestial journey where the center of the sun rises and sets directly over the equator, and day and night are of approximately equal length everywhere on earth. We call these times the equinox from the Latin for "equal night." A less common but possibly more correct name is equilux or "equal light." The September equinox marks the beginning of the new season: autumn, and the time of harvest festivals in the northern hemisphere. On this transmission of Hearts of Space, calm and balanced acoustic ambient for the seasonal transition, on a program called EQUILUX. Music is by PETER BRODERICK, LUDOVICO EINAUDI, FEDERICO ALBANESE, TOM EATON, FLOW, CARL WEINGARTEN & CATHERINE MARIE CHARLTON, GREG HAINES, A WINGED VICTORY FOR THE SULLEN, and ENZO. [ view playlist ] [ view Flickr image gallery ] [ play 30 second MP3 promo ] Continue reading
Posted Sep 19, 2020 at hearts of space | news
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The history of Jamaican Dub music is rich and fascinating. Dub grew out of reggae in the 1960s, and evolved well beyond its popular parent. It was a studio craft where producers created instrumental remixes of reggae tracks by removing the vocals, adding echo, reverb and delay, and dubbing in new ambient sounds. Essentially, Dub was an early form of popular electronic music. If you think all this had something to do with cannabis, you'd be understating the case. In a 1982 essay, LUKE EHRLICH said: "With dub, Jamaican music spaced out completely. If reggae is Africa in the New World, then dub must be Africa on the moon; it's the psychedelic music I expected to hear in the 1960s...and didn't. The bass and drums conjure up a dark, vast musical portrait of outer space, with sounds suspended like glowing planets or the fragments of instruments careening by, leaving trails like comets and meteors." Dub was a natural link to later electronic genres like techno, ambient, trip hop and electronic dance music. On this transmission of Hearts of Space, the trancey beats of Jamaican Dub and its electronic descendants, on a program from guest producer DAVID J. EGAN called DEEP DUB. Music is by JAH WOBBLE & MARCONI UNION, ORKUS, FINGERS IN THE NOISE, ECHO GRID, PURL & DEFLEKTION, LOSCIL, and MOTIONFIELD. [ view program page ] [ view Flickr image gallery ] [ play 30 second MP3 promo ] Continue reading
Posted Sep 11, 2020 at hearts of space | news
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Maybe it was just a coincidence, a timely convergence, but the era of space exploration that began in the 1960s was also a formative decade for electronic music. At the time, German experimental composer KARLHEINZ STOCKHAUSEN observed that there was a natural relationship between his electronic music and images of cosmic space. Maybe it was the drugs, but it seemed right. In Germany, the late 1960s saw the rise of the "Kozmik Musik" genre; electronic nebulae blossomed all over Europe and the English speaking countries; SUN RA toured the world and played his own brand of Afro-cosmic funk, while JOHN COLTRANE and his wife ALICE released the album COSMIC MUSIC. In the 1970's the COSMIC COURIERS record label was established, PROGRESSIVE ROCK went cosmic and became SPACE ROCK, BRIAN ENO invented Ambient, and PINK FLOYD became the biggest selling band in the world after Dark Side of the Moon. It was Good Times for space fans. Today, electronic spacemusic is an established genre with a nice article in Wikipedia and a steady stream of significant new music from masters of the craft. On this transmission of Hearts of Space, a classic journey in the electronic starfields, on a program called MASTERS OF SPACE. Music is by ERIK WØLLO & MICHAEL STEARNS, DAVID HELPLING & JON JENKINS, JON DURANT & ROBERT JÜRJENDAL, PHILLIP WILKERSON, and JEFF GREINKE. [ view playlist ] [ view Flickr image gallery ] [ play 30 second MP3 promo ] Continue reading
Posted Sep 5, 2020 at hearts of space | news
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In stressful times, we seek the comfort of the familiar, the predictable, the tried and true. And in music, that often means returning to the joys and pleasures of the acoustic guitar. It's not just the foundation of what JOHN FAHEY memorably called "American primitive guitar;" in addition to its role accompanying singers, as a solo instrument it's a rich vehicle for personal expression, creative innovation, and contemplative immersion. On this transmission of Hearts of Space, we touch all those possibilities, on a program called SIX STRING UNIVERSE. Music is by CHRIS HAUGEN, FLOW, ALEX DE GRASSI, RICHARD OSBORNE, MATTHEW MONTFORT, and CLAES NILSSON. [ view playlist ] [ view Flickr image gallery ] [ play 30 second MP3 promo ] Continue reading
Posted Aug 29, 2020 at hearts of space | news
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Let's talk about electronic music. As with acoustic instruments, we have freedom of expression with the core musical variables: melody, rhythm, tempo, and harmony. But we've gained the ability to create the tone, the timbre, the character, and even the spatial dimension of the electronic sound. In fact, the space or ambience of the sound becomes a fundamental artistic choice. Electronic music can create "soundscapes"—immersive images of virtual environments. Unlike the literal sound images of acoustic instruments, these electronic images can be deliberately amorphous...boundless...endless...unlimited. They can imply vast, fluid, diffuse, virtual spaces, whose dimensions are perceptually infinite. We can even make this quality the subject of the music, and call it "spacemusic"—a descriptive term that arose organically in the early days of popular electronic music. Today, ambient-electronic artists are creating sonic images of infinity—endless virtual spaces we can expand into, bathe in, savor, and explore. On this transmission of Hearts of Space, the quest for unlimited spaces in electronic sound, on a program called VISIONS OF INFINITY. Music is by DEEPSPACE, STEVE ROACH, KEVIN BRAHENY FORTUNE, MAX CORBACHO, and JEFF PEARCE. [ view playlist ] [ view Flickr image gallery ] [ play 30 second MP3 promo ] Continue reading
Posted Aug 22, 2020 at hearts of space | news
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Let's hear it for The Sun, ladies and gentlemen. It's impossible to think of anything more important—to our very existence, our history, our evolution, and our future as a species. So it's a big subject: the sun is responsible for super-basic stuff like day and night, the year, the weather, and the climate. It's the key to almost all life on earth, the source of all our energy (one way or another), the key ingredient in everything we eat, and the indispensable element in our vacations. I mean, who wants to vacation in the rain? Astronomically speaking, the sun is our home star, a member of the "yellow dwarf" class. It's 4.6 billion years old, over a hundred times bigger in diameter than earth, and weighs 330,000 times as much, despite being 98% hydrogen and helium—two of the lightest materials in existence. The sun is a bright sphere of superheated plasma; at its core is a nuclear furnace, where fusion of hydrogen atoms creates temperatures of almost 30 million degrees Fahrenheit, while the surface of the sun is a relatively balmy 10,000 degrees. We're 93 million miles away, and it still feels hot! The sun has been central to many human cultures and religions since prehistoric times. It's been worshipped as a deity and celebrated in myth, art and literature, especially in ancient Egypt. Those days are gone, but ambient electronic artists are still inspired by it. On this transmission of Hearts of Space...a tribute to the sun and its season, on a program called HELIOS. Music is by SOLAR FIELDS, AES DANA, STEVE ROACH, ISHQ, ALPHA WAVE MOVEMENT, ERIC WØLLO, MAX CORBACHO, and HOLLAN HOLMES. [ view playlist ] [ view Flickr image gallery ] [ play 30 second MP3 promo ] Continue reading
Posted Aug 14, 2020 at hearts of space | news
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Centuries ago, a music emerged out of the world's deserts and tribal cultures. It was built on trance-like rhythms and the most primitive instruments: flutes, rattles, and drums. Against all odds, in the late 20th century elements of this ancient indigenous music were embraced by electronic musicians searching for an earthy, vital sound to balance the dematerialized tones of electronic instruments, and ground the atmospheric soundscapes of ambient. Their quest led to a hybrid electro-acoustic genre originally called "techno-tribal" and later "tribal ambient." In retrospect, it was part of a wider movement ethno-botanist TERENCE McKENNA famously termed The Archaic Revival. Why would a sophisticated, technologically advanced culture want to revive an ancient, supposedly primitive one? In an era where our experience is increasingly mediated, artificial, and virtual — we seek authenticity, direct experience, and a deeper connection to our environment, our history, and our inner worlds. On this transmission of Hearts of Space, ambient electronics meet flutes, rattles, drums, and drones, on a journey across the desert mesas, wind-blown dunes, and rocky plains of the tribal ambient soundscape called TECHNO-TRIBAL. [ view playlist ] [ view Flickr image gallery ] [ play 30 second MP3 promo ] Continue reading
Posted Aug 8, 2020 at hearts of space | news
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MENA is an acronym for the geographical region of the Middle East and North Africa, encompassing give or take 19 countries with a long, complicated history and a shared musical culture. Political conflict and anti-music fundamentalism in the region over the last 50 years led to a diaspora of MENA musicians to cities all over Europe, Canada and the U.S. Leaving one's home and native culture is almost always difficult and unpredictable, but for music it can be a good thing, exposing musicians to new influences, new creative relationships, and unexpected cross-fertilizations. The classic example is DICK DALE, the inventor of Surf Rock—the original 1960s fusion of Middle Eastern scales and tremolo electric guitar drowned in reverb. Today the rich traditions of Middle Eastern and North African music combine freely with jazz, rock, rap, electronic, ambient and even new age, in a brilliant diversity of sound and style.On this transmission of HEARTS of SPACE, the trance-inducing rhythms and deep modal melodies of the MENA diaspora, on a program called DESERT CROSSING 2. [ view playlist ] [ view Flickr image gallery ] [ play 30 second MP3 promo ] Continue reading
Posted Jul 31, 2020 at hearts of space | news
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Over the last 75 years, composers were gradually freed from creating music with notes on paper, and the limitations of acoustically generated sounds. Slowly at first, then in a rush of innovation in the 20th century, they were given the tools to create music directly from recorded and electronically generated sounds. The electronic studio itself became the master instrument, and imagination was unbound. It's hard to overstate how revolutionary this was. It led to a much expanded palette of musical sounds, an explosion of popular electronic dance music, and immersive music with a focus on imagery, ambience, and virtual travel in sonic space. Composers became "sound designers," and listeners became sonic cosmonauts. Environmental sounds captured by high quality portable recorders lent a new psychological dimension to music, making us more aware of the natural ambient sounds around us. On this transmission of Hearts of Space, a journey in electro-acoustic spaces at sea and on land, on a program called TERRASONIC. Music is by ATOMIC SKUNK, ISHQ, RUDY ADRIAN, and LONEWARD. [ view playlist ] [ view Flickr image gallery ] [ play 30 second MP3 promo ] Continue reading
Posted Jul 25, 2020 at hearts of space | news
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In the warm, bright days of summer, an ambient fan yearning for travel to exotic cultures will book a flight on Sequencer Airlines. With its steady pulse, it's a perfect rhythm for moving through space. The roots go back to 9th century Persia, but the music sequencer idea really got going in the 19th century after the Industrial Revolution, with popular devices like music boxes, mechanical organs, and player pianos. By the first generation of electronic synthesizers in the 1960s and 70s, the Step Sequencer was a machine that turned equal length notes into repeating rhythm patterns. They're simple, delightfully hypnotic, and fun to work with. Today things are more complicated, but a lot more powerful. We have audio sample sequencers, loop-based creative music software, phrase samplers, and digital audio recording software many times more powerful than the primitive sequencers of early synths—and hey! They're still fun to work with. On this transmission of Hearts of Space...a journey from kinetic sequencer patterns to exotic Southeast Asian ambient soundscapes—on a program called AMBIENT TRAVELER 2. Music by ATOMIC SKUNK, DAVID PARSONS, CHRISTEL VERAART, CHRONOTOPE PROJECT, LOREN NERELL, ALIO DIE & LORENZO MONTANA, RICHARD BONE. [ view program page ] [ view Flickr image gallery ] [ play 30 second MP3 promo ] Continue reading
Posted Jul 18, 2020 at hearts of space | news
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The seductive sound of the Hang, ladies and gentlemen, a 21st century Swiss offspring of the steel pan drum. Gentle and tuneful, the handpans, as the new percussion family are called, are the perfect thing for delighting the ear and bringing joy to the heart during this disrupted and constrained summer of 2020. After months of enforced confinement and social distance, the warm weather brings thoughts of summers past, filled with sun, sport, and vacation pleasures, while the steel drum's Caribbean origins in Trinidad and Tobago suggest images of island adventures, white sands, and emerald waters. It's a vision that's irresistible in normal times, let alone now. On this transmission of Hearts of Space, a virtual vacation in the seductive soundworlds of the Hang, on a program called SUMMER DRUMMER 2. Music is by JAMES HOOD, LAURA INSERRA, HANG MASSIVE, HANG DRUM PLAYER, and THE MANY RIVERS ENSEMBLE (featuring HANG MASSIVE). [ view playlist ] [ view Flickr image gallery ] [ play 30 second MP3 promo ] Continue reading
Posted Jul 10, 2020 at hearts of space | news
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It's been a while since we did a program on the music of the America to our south. It's a whole continent, after all, and the scope and variety of music from the distinctive cultures of Bolivia, Peru, Ecuador, Uruguay, Argentina and Brazil is enormous. Whether it comes from the mountain cultures, the grasslands, the rainforest, or one of the great cities; is based on influences from the native Indians, or from Spain or other European countries — the music of South America has a depth and passion all its own, and genres like Tango have created fans around the world. On this transmission of Hearts of Space, we return to the soul and space of South American music, on a program called ROMANTICO. Music is by OSCAR REYNOLDS, INKUYO, TRIO GARUFA, GUSTAVO SANTAOLALLA, ASTOR PIAZZOLLA, STEPHAN MICUS, DINO SALUZZI, and EGBERTO GISMONTI. [ view playlist ] [ view Flickr image gallery ] [ play 30 second MP3 promo ] Continue reading
Posted Jul 4, 2020 at hearts of space | news
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As this strange and unprecedented summer rolls on, it's a good time for us to resurrect one of our older, prematurely abandoned series of programs devoted to AMBIENT COOL. What, you may ask, is Ambient Cool? Well, it's a sound and an attitude that traces back to the iconoclastic contemporary trumpet player JON HASSELL—and to the cool jazz of MILES DAVIS before him. Hassell advocated what he called "Fourth World" music, a timely and inevitable fusion he described as "a unified primitive/futuristic sound combining features of world ethnic styles with advanced electronic techniques." Playing microtonal Indian ragas on his electronically processed trumpet is a prime example. It all came together, as these things have often done, under the tender guidance of producer and Ambient Godfather BRIAN ENO, with Hassell's 1980 album Fourth World, Vol.1: Possible Musics. In fact, Brian Eno is the common link and creative touchstone for all the artists in this program. Lay it back, stretch it out, and let it float — and you have the recipe for Ambient Cool. On this transmission of Hearts of Space, a journey in the effortless galleries of Ambient Cool, on a program called AMBIENT COOL 3. Music is by JON HASSELL, ROBERT FRIPP & BRIAN ENO, and ALEX HAAS & BILL LASWELL. [ view playlist ] [ view Flickr image gallery ] [ play 30 second MP3 promo ] Continue reading
Posted Jun 27, 2020 at hearts of space | news
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Despite a career in contemporary music that began in the legendary days of the 1960s, the brilliant English guitarist, composer, bandleader, innovator and collaborator ROBERT FRIPP has never become as famous as his friend BRIAN ENO—another brilliant Englishman Fripp worked with on several influential proto-ambient and pop records in the 1970s, with artists like DAVID BOWIE, BLONDIE, PETER GABRIEL, DAVID SYLVIAN and others. Fripp co-founded the seminal progressive rock band KING CRIMSON in 1968, and has been its principal guitarist and fearlessly innovative leader through over 50 years of on-again, off-again activity. As a prog rock guitarist, Fripp can fill arenas with massive walls of sound, but he's also a student of the teachings of the Armenian mystic philosopher G.I. GURDJIEFF, and has a more cerebral, contemplative side. Through his work with Eno, Fripp developed an analog looping system he called Frippertonics. Looping repeats musical phrases with a delay and layers them on top of themselves, turning musical fragments into continuous streams of sound. When combined with Fripp's sophisticated guitar technique, Frippertonics has produced a series of refined electronic soundscapes. On this transmission of Hearts of Space, the sublime soundscapes of ROBERT FRIPP, on a program called MUSIC FOR QUIET MOMENTS. We'll feature the first four releases in a projected series of 50 weekly installments available online at Fripp's website DGMLIVE.com for exactly 99 cents each. [ view playlist ] [ view Flickr image gallery ] [ play 30 second MP3 promo ] Continue reading
Posted Jun 20, 2020 at hearts of space | news
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It's been over 60 years since western musicians began taking Indian music seriously. And no wonder — it's so completely different from western music, it might as well have come from another planet. Nevertheless, beginning in the 1950s, Indian classical musicians led by RAVI SHANKAR and ALI AKBAR KHAN, established a dialog with European and American classical artists like violinist YEHUDI MENUIN, and in the 1960s, famously with pop artists like GEORGE HARRISON of the BEATLES. The last 40 years have seen creative cross-fertilizations in many genres, from film music to rap, folk music to ambient electronic. At the same time, the emotional devotion at the core of Indian music has taken hold in the west with the bhakti tradition of devotional chant, bhajan and kirtan. On this transmission of Hearts of Space, the slow, sensuous sound of Indian devotional chants and ambient instrumentals, on a program called DIVINE SURRENDER. Music is by AL GROMER KHAN, HANS CHRISTIAN, MARK SEELIG, CRAIG PRUESS, BEN LEINBACH, and RAGANI. [ view playlist ] [ view Flickr image gallery ] [ play 30 second MP3 promo ] Continue reading
Posted Jun 13, 2020 at hearts of space | news
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Ahhh, the sweetness of early summer, the balm of warm breezes, the pollen, the allergies. It's a good time for electro-acoustic music with gentle rhythms, soft harmonies and seductive melodies. In a word, something "mellotronic." Now, historians of electronic instruments will tell you that the Mellotron was a tape-based, polyphonic, sample-playback keyboard, developed in England in the early 1960s. The instrument achieved classic status for its key role in popular albums by the Moody Blues and the Beatles, and brought violin, cello, brass, flute and choir sounds to innumerable albums from the Progressive Rock era. These days, every laptop can be a sampler, the original Mellotron sound is a menu choice, and the orchestration of electronic music is open to all. On this transmission of Hearts of Space, we revisit the romantic-contemplative side of ambient electronica, on a program called MELLOTRONIC. Music is by PATRICK O'HEARN, LUDOVICO EINAUDI, THIERRY DAVID, CRAIG PADILLA, MICHELE IPPOLITO, and FRANK STEINER, JR. [ view playlist ] [ view Flickr image gallery ] [ play 30 second MP3 promo ] Continue reading
Posted Jun 5, 2020 at hearts of space | news
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In the early 20th century, the Theosophists and the Rosicrucians theorized an ethereal plane—a nonmaterial level of reality above the physical plane. When applied to music, ethereal implies subtle, light and airy, immaterial and weightless. It's a word that's often used to describe electronic music, where sounds are not produced by physical instruments and have an abstract, immaterial quality. This music can take us to virtual spaces and imaginary worlds. On this transmission of Hearts of Space, synthetic journeys on the subtle planes, on a program called ETHEREAL ELECTRONIC. Music is by NICHOLAS GUNN, DAVID ARKENSTONE, GILES REAVES, KEVIN BRAHENY FORTUNE, PAUL AVGERINOS, BING SATELLITES, IASOS, and ERIK WØLLO. [ view playlist ] [ view Flickr image gallery ] [ play 30 second MP3 promo ] Continue reading
Posted May 30, 2020 at hearts of space | news
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FOR DECADES, globalization has been a fact of life. And even before Covid-19, it was becoming controversial. Now, with critical supply chains being disrupted by the pandemic, we're having a bit of a rethink. Whatever happens with global trade, one thing is certain: the global exchange of music, film, art and media is a cultural fact of life that will remain as vibrant and creative as ever. San Francisco is the home of Six Degrees Records, a company that's been dedicated to crossing musical borders since 1996, with the provocative slogan "everything is closer than you think." They live the idea, releasing a wide range of traditional and progressive music from around the planet. On this transmission of Hearts of Space, an Anglo-American ambient journey, on a program called SIX DEGREES OF AMBIENT. Music is by ANOTHER FINE DAY, TOM MIDDLETON, BOB HOLROYD, TOM GREEN, HALFTRIBE, ANDREW HEATH, DARSHAN AMBIENT, JEFF PEARCE, RICHARD NORRIS, and MARK ISHAM. [ view playlist ] [ view Flickr image gallery ] [ play 30 second MP3 promo ] Continue reading
Posted May 23, 2020 at hearts of space | news
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The "progressive" label is growing, and it has nothing to do with politics. In music, the term has a history that goes back to Progressive Folk in the 1930s. After that came Progressive Jazz from the 1940s to the 1970s, Progressive Rock, Pop, and Bluegrass in the 1960s, Progressive Country in the 1970s, Progressive Metal in the 1980s, and Progressive Electronic and Progressive House in the 1990s. Progressive is what happens when a genre has matured, and there's an abundance of highly skilled musicians who want to stay creatively challenged. On this transmission of Hearts of Space...if the progressive label means expanding stylistic and conceptual boundaries and synthesizing cultural influences—then I'm gonna say we're overdue for a genre—and a program—called PROGRESSIVE AMBIENT. [ view program page ] [ view Flickr image gallery ] [ play 30 second MP3 promo ] Continue reading
Posted May 16, 2020 at hearts of space | news
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The relentless pace of the modern world just had a global reboot, and the reason wasn't even human. It's beyond ironic that it took a rogue microbe to force the world to take a time out. Sheltered in place, working from home, reaching out with video and electronic messages, we're moving toward a world that's going to be slower, more limited, and less intense than before. After that, who knows? We might like it better. For ambient and contemplative musicians, speed—or to use the musical term—tempo, has always been an artistic choice. And for centuries, a select group of them have chosen to make music that's slow, quiet, and heartfelt. If it sounds better than ever these days, it's because we need it. On this transmission of Hearts of Space, a journey from serene to introspective, on a program called "DEEP SERENITY." Music is by FLOW, PAUL WINTER CONSORT, AUKAI, GINA LENEÉ, KATHRYN KAYE, TOM EATON, PATRICK O'HEARN, and DAVID NORLAND. [ view playlist ] [ view Flickr image gallery ] [ play 30 second MP3 promo ] Continue reading
Posted May 9, 2020 at hearts of space | news