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somewhere in space
Hearts of Space radio and online music service producer
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From the world of traditional Hindu and Buddhist religion come practices focused on devotion—to god, to guru or to the divine itself. The Sanskrit word bhakti means practicing a path centered on emotional devotion as a spiritual principle and means of salvation. The adoption of Indian spirituality and culture by westerners after the 1960s famously led to yoga and meditation, and also to kirtan—group chanting of Indian devotional prayers — and later to new hybrids of western and Indian music. On this transmission of HEARTS of SPACE, the ardent sound of devotional chants and contemplative instrumentals, on a program called DEVOTION. Music is by CRAIG PRUESS, HANS CHRISTIAN, ALAM KHAN, CONFLUENCE TRIO, WHITE SUN, MANEESH DE MOOR+SUDHA, AL GROMER KHAN, and DEVA PREMAL. [ view program page ] [ view Flickr image gallery ] [ play 30 second MP3 promo ] Continue reading
Posted 4 days ago at hearts of space | news
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PSYCHEDELIC MUSIC was born in the 1960s, a predictable mutation of psychedelic drugs and popular culture. The roots of the word psychedelic mean "revealing the mind" — a revelation that turned out to be both colorful and unpredictable. Psychedelic music aimed to reveal an expanded version of the mind, using audible distortion and warped perspective, sustained floating textures and drones, fractal repetitions and feedback, liberally seasoned with sounds from nature and exotic cultures, especially India. As a trend, it ran its course in the 1960s, was revived in the 1970s, quoted lovingly by fashionable bands in the 80s and 90s, and became a core influence on millennial genres like Trip Hop, Shoegaze, Acid Jazz, Acid House, and the many varieties of Trance — to name a few. We just can't seem to quit it. Like an aesthetic virus, the pure electronic form of psychedelic music invented in the 1960s and 70s infected musicians using sound as a vehicle for inner space travel and consciousness alteration. In a word: trippy. Along the way, these sonic explorers found kindred spirits in archaic traditions like shamanism and pagan rituals. What began as free exploration with mind-bending chemicals ultimately became a quest for new modes of perception, psychological therapy, escape from the normal boundaries of self, and at its most extreme — visions and hallucinations at the borders of oblivion. These grassroots experiments paved the way for the massive tribal-Electronic Dance Music festivals of today, with their promise of transcending self through ecstatic group experience. On this transmission of Hearts of Space, a journey in the altered soundscapes of psychedelic space, on a program called PSYCHETRONIC SUMMER. Music is by THE FUTURE SOUND OF LONDON, SCANN-TEC, ISHQ, LIGHTWAVE, FORREST SMITHSON, CYBERNIUM (MICHEL HUYGEN & PASCAL LANGUIRAND), and CSILLAGKÖD. [ view playlist ] [ view... Continue reading
Posted Sep 6, 2019 at hearts of space | news
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Out on the western range, there's places where the deep prairie meets the desert at the end of the line. Places where the tough get going and the outlaws go to hide: where the land's eroded, the water's scarce, the weather's bad, the nights are dangerous, and everything you see is a survivor. It's called..."The Badlands." On this transmission of HEARTS of SPACE, a program inspired by this hard and beautiful environment, called BADLANDS. Music is by DANIEL LANOIS, ERIC TINGSTAD, CARL WEINGARTEN, BRUCE KAPHAN, EXPLOSIONS IN THE SKY, JAPANCAKES and DAVID TORN. [ view playlist ] [ view Flickr image gallery ] [ play 30 second MP3 promo ] Continue reading
Posted Aug 30, 2019 at hearts of space | news
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Would you believe me if I told you that all the sounds you're hearing are made with an analog synthesizer? Strange but true. It's the work of KEVIN BRAHENY FORTUNE, one of the early masters of long-form electronic ambient music. And it's a good story. The 1970s were a decade of discovery and development for electronic music. Early analog synthesizer modules by ROBERT MOOG, DON BUCHLA, and SERGE TCHEREPNIN fueled an explosion of creativity. If you were serious, you wound up building your own instruments and creating your own sounds. Then KEVIN BRAHENY (the Fortune came later...) was a talented musician and soprano saxophone player in Los Angeles who worked designing and building electronic instruments with several of the early pioneers of analog synthesis in California. The foundations for Ambient electronic music were being created out of the new possibilities opened up by the synthesizer, and the psychological and social changes inspired by psychedelic drugs. This new sensibility lead to the creation of extended musical "journeys" of 30 minutes or more, which could be released on cassette. Later, even longer journeys were possible on CD. In 1980 Braheny improvised a live 35 minute "lullaby" to close a HEARTS OF SPACE fundraising special on our home station, KPFA-FM in Berkeley. It turned out so well it was released later that year as "Lullaby for the Hearts of Space," along with a composed companion piece called "After I Said Goodnight. " And that's where we begin this edition of Hearts of Space called NOCTURNAL TRANSMISSIONS. Music is by KEVIN BRAHENY FORTUNE, CHAD HOEFLER, ROBERT RICH, ALIO DIE, and IASOS. [ view playlist ] [ view Flickr image gallery ] [ play 30 second MP3 promo ] Continue reading
Posted Aug 23, 2019 at hearts of space | news
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While world politics seems to get ever more contentious these days, a quiet alternative of cooperation and collaboration has been going on in the world of music. Historically powered by travel on trade routes like the Silk Road, modern recording and communication technologies fueled a worldwide acceleration of the process during the 20th century. In the internet era, music propagates around the world instantly, and a new breed of open-minded musicians collaborate freely, cross-fertilizing their native traditions to produce new and vigorous hybrids. On this transmission of Hearts of Space, cross-cultural fusions inspired by the contemplative music of Asia and Africa, on a program called GLOBAL FUSION. Music is by PORANGUÍ, DEAD CAN DANCE, STEPHAN MICUS, STEVEN CHESNE, TONNE/SKY/ARELLANO, MANDRELL & WERTHEIMER, and MARK DEUTSCH. [ view program page ] [ view Flickr image gallery ] [ play 30 second MP3 promo ] Continue reading
Posted Aug 17, 2019 at hearts of space | news
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The transition from 'electric' to 'electronic' was one of the great technical achievements of the 20th century. Electronic engineering emerged out of the telephone, radio, film and television industries, and military communication and weapon systems during World War II. The earliest devices for creating electronic music actually date from the end of the 19th century. By the 1920s and 30s we had compact, playable electronic instruments like the Russian Theremin, the French Ondes Martenot, and the German Trautonium. Development of recording technology led to experimentation with record players and tape recorders to manipulate sound and create new kinds of music. Electronic music expanded exponentially in the 1960s and 70s with the arrival of practical electronic synthesizers, fueling an era of explosive creativity. Today electronic music extends from mainstream dance music to experimental noise, with literally thousands of sub-genres, and an unlimited palette of sounds and creative possibilities. On this transmission of Hearts of Space, a journey in the infinite tone-worlds of electronic space, on a program called ELECTRONIC DIMENSIONS. Music is by FOURTH DIMENSION, BLUETECH, ESKOSTATIC, BETWEEN INTERVAL, SCOTT LAWLOR, and ALPHA WAVE MOVEMENT. [ view program page ] [ view Flickr image gallery ] [ play 30 second MP3 promo ] Continue reading
Posted Aug 10, 2019 at hearts of space | news
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Middle Eastern music from the so-called "cradle of civilization" goes back some 5000 years. Today it spans a vast region stretching from Morocco to Iran—including the 22 Arab countries of the Middle East and North Africa, Persian music from Iran, Hebrew music from Israel, pre-Islamic music from Assyria, music from Turkey, Armenia, and Cyprus, plus the nomadic Berbers of North Africa, Coptic Christians of Egypt, and the great Andalusian music of Muslim Spain. It's a rich mix with a colorful history. Common features are a system of melodic 'modes' called maqam based on quarter tones (with up to 24 notes to the octave), sinuous melodic ornamentation, and ecstatic, sophisticated rhythms. According to 11th century Persian philosopher and theologian AL-GHAZAL, "Ecstasy means the state that comes from listening to music." On this transmission of Hearts of Space, the microtonal melodies and hypnotic percussion of Middle Eastern music, on a program called ECSTATIC RHYTHMS. Music is by MERCAN DEDE, DEAD CAN DANCE, LOGA RAMIN TORKIAN & AZAM ALI, WAHID, KRONOS QUARTET & MAHSA VAHDAT, MICHEL BANABILA, and ANOUAR BRAHEM. [ view program page ] [ view Flickr image gallery ] [ play 30 second MP3 promo ] Continue reading
Posted Aug 3, 2019 at hearts of space | news
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In the desert, extremes of sun, wind, temperature and terrain challenge all living things to evolve a strategy for survival. So desert travelers take it slow and steady. But for those who venture into its vast spaces, the promise of discovery awaits: a mythic environment of isolation and introspection, concealed by panoramic expanses. In the words of EDWARD ABBEY, the desert is a "window onto eternity." On this transmission of Hearts of Space, a deep journey called DESERT DREAMFIELDS. Music is by STEVE ROACH, DWIGHT LOOP, TOM HEASLEY, and the late A.PRODUCE. [ view playlist ] [ view Flickr image gallery ] [ play 30 second MP3 promo ] Continue reading
Posted Jul 26, 2019 at hearts of space | news
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After centuries of talk about "the man in the moon," by 1969 humans finally had the technology to put men ON the moon. In 2019 we celebrate that epoch-making American achievement—the beginning of the age of space exploration, the 50th anniversary of the Apollo 11 mission to the moon, and astronaut NEIL ARMSTRONG's famous walk. It's a cultural touchstone—an event that's inspired a small sub-genre of electronic music and soundtracks from the 1980s to today. On this transmission of Hearts of Space, we celebrate the spirit of space exploration and the 50th anniversary of the Apollo 11 mission, on a program called ONE SMALL STEP. Music is by BRIAN ENO with ROGER ENO & DANIEL LANOIS, JONN SERRIE, MARTIN HUBA, MATT MORTON, PALANCAR, and JAJA. [ view program page ] [ view Flickr image gallery ] [ play 30 second MP3 promo ] Continue reading
Posted Jul 20, 2019 at hearts of space | news
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In the warm, bright days of summer, an ambient fan yearning for travel to exotic cultures will book a flight on Sequencer Airlines. With its steady pulse, it's a perfect rhythm for moving through space. The roots go back to 9th century Persia, but the music sequencer idea really got going in the 19th century after the Industrial Revolution, with popular devices like music boxes, mechanical organs, and player pianos. By the first generation of electronic synthesizers in the 1960s and 70s, the Step Sequencer was a machine that turned equal length notes into repeating rhythm patterns. They're simple, delightfully hypnotic, and fun to work with. Today things are more complicated, but a lot more powerful. We have audio sample sequencers, loop-based creative music software, phrase samplers, and digital audio recording software many times more powerful than the primitive sequencers of early synths—and hey! They're still fun to work with. On this transmission of Hearts of Space...a journey from kinetic sequencer patterns to exotic Southeast Asian ambient soundscapes—on a program called AMBIENT TRAVELER 2. Music by ATOMIC SKUNK, DAVID PARSONS, CHRISTEL VERAART, CHRONOTOPE PROJECT, LOREN NERELL, ALIO DIE & LORENZO MONTANA, RICHARD BONE. [ view program page ] [ view Flickr image gallery ] [ play 30 second MP3 promo ] Continue reading
Posted Jul 13, 2019 at hearts of space | news
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Since time out of mind, drumming has been both a musical practice and a social magnet. In the warm zone cultures of the Caribbean, Africa, the Indo-Pacific, and Latin America — drumming music is king. When the temperature rises, the blood seems to thin and the body wants to move. For most, it's a time for dancing, but for others, it's an invitation to the hypnotic state of dynamic stillness: the use of rhythm to achieve deeper levels of concentration. On this transmission of Hearts of Space, we follow the pulse of the season to its quiet heart, on program called SUMMER DRUMMER. Music is by GLEN VELEZ, JON IVERSON, RAVID, STEPHAN MICUS, LAURA INSERRA & DARREN GIBBS, and ED MANN. [ view playlist ] [ view Flickr image gallery ] [ play 30 second MP3 promo ] Continue reading
Posted Jul 6, 2019 at hearts of space | news
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The legendary trumpeter MILES DAVIS from his 1969 classic IN A SILENT WAY—the album that established laid-back, atmospheric, electrified jazz fusion — built on the acoustic Cool Jazz of the 1950s. It's been called a "proto-ambient masterpiece." In retrospect, 1969 was the threshold of the electronic revolution in popular music that brought us the ambient electronic music of today. [Miles] Davis added two electric pianos, organ and electric guitar to his band, slowed down the tempos, and made music history. On this transmission of Hearts of Space, we feature the sound of the trumpet and the flugelhorn in a journey from cool jazz, to space jazz, to ambient — on a program called BEYOND THE COOL. Music is by MILES DAVIS, JEFF OSTER, TWILIGHT ARCHIVE, TOM LUTHER, FRANK MAUCERI & MIKE WHITEHEAD, CHAD KETTERING, NILS PETTER MOLVAER, and MEG BOWLES. [ view program page ] [ view Flickr image gallery ] [ play 30 second MP3 promo ] Continue reading
Posted Jun 29, 2019 at hearts of space | news
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Summer officially arrives on the 21st of June — the longest day of the year in the northern hemisphere. For ambient musicians, the extra light and heat inspire influences from faraway warm-weather cultures; exotic acoustic instruments, tribal rhythms, and mind-bending shamanic rituals, combined with creative electronics and native soundscapes. It breeds an evolving genre originally called "techno-tribal." Today we call it "tribal ambient" — it evokes atavistic memories of our village past for our digital tribes, and creates a space for virtual travel, even if the body has to stay at home. On this transmission of Hearts of Space from guest producer DAVID J. EGAN, a tribal/ambient/solstice journey for summer, on a program called MOONTRIBE. [ view program page ] [ view Flickr image gallery ] [ play 30 second MP3 promo ] Continue reading
Posted Jun 22, 2019 at hearts of space | news
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If there's one thing that Ambient electronic music excels at creating, it's the experience of floating in space. And when that space is high, light, and airy, we call it atmospheric. Atmospheres have qualities — elevation, temperature, brightness, color, density, and a wide range of tones. When we immerse ourselves in sonic atmospheres, our normal sense of time seems to disappear: suspended in space, we lose track of time. Einstein probably had a special theory about that. On this transmission of HEARTS of SPACE, an airy, immersive electronic journey, on a program called ATMOSPHERIC. Music is by KIT WATKINS, JACK HERTZ, CRAIG PADILLA, ROBERT SCOTT THOMPSON, ALPHA WAVE MOVEMENT, and DARSHAN AMBIENT. [ view playlist ] [ view Flickr image gallery ] [ play 30 second MP3 promo ] Continue reading
Posted Jun 15, 2019 at hearts of space | news
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The Hindustani classical music of North India was little-known to westerners until the 1960's, when The Beatles famously introduced Indian sitar virtuoso RAVI SHANKAR to their audience and incorporated the instrument into their music. The long-necked lute called the sitar and it's bass version the surbahar, other unique Indian string instruments like the veena, the sarod, the sarangi and the esraj, along with the bansuri flute, have gradually become familiar to western listeners in the last hundred years. More recently, the microtonal scales of Indian music lent themselves to being combined with electronic instruments, giving rise to an ambient genre we call Indo-tronic. On this transmission of Hearts of Space, the fusion of microtonal melodies, exotic ornaments, and electronic tone colors — on a program called INDO-TRONICA 3. [ view program page ] [ view Flickr image gallery ] [ play 30 second MP3 promo ] Continue reading
Posted Jun 8, 2019 at hearts of space | news
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In the fervent, prolific, always evolving field of popular electronic music, genres rise, shine, and set—often with alarming speed. So it's reassuring to know that the relatively long-running streams of Psychedelic and Trance music have embraced the cool sonorities and spatial sound images of Ambient—giving birth to the variously named hybrids Psybient, Psytrance, or just Psy. It's a realm worth exploring. On this transmission of Hearts of Space...what happened when Psytrance Met Ambient—on a program called ADVENTURES IN PSYBIENT. It's a love story. [ view program page ] [ view Flickr image gallery ] [ play 30 second MP3 promo ] Continue reading
Posted Jun 1, 2019 at hearts of space | news
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Spring has long been the most unpredictable of seasons—these days, more than ever. This week we had a bit of January in May here in Northern California; it was back to boots and raingear. Next week it'll be like high summer. Everything is changing, and the wind rushes in every direction in a futile effort at equilibrium. The seasonal winds inspire ambient musicians to create an airy, open music with flutes and electronics, and we can ride the sound currents like birds in search of new frontiers. On this transmission of Hearts of Space, an airy, windy, floating journey for spring, on a program called VERNAL FLIGHT. [ view program page ] [ view Flickr image gallery ] [ play 30 second MP3 promo ] Continue reading
Posted May 25, 2019 at hearts of space | news
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Ahhh, the fullness of Spring! It arrives when we're not looking, concealed by fresh winds, bright clouds, and unpredictable weather. Beneath the superficial chaos beats a steady rhythm, as the natural world acclimates to more light and heat. The flora bloom and change, while the fauna increase their activity after the restrictions of winter. It's a time for production, and reproduction. On this transmission of Hearts of Space we sound the fullness of spring, on a program called WINDS OF CHANGE. Music is by ERIK WØLLO, ATOMIC SKUNK, ISHQ, FORREST SMITHSON, DAN POUND, YUNOMI, ALPHA WAVE MOVEMENT, and LEMONGRASS. [ view playlist ] [ view Flickr image gallery ] [ play 30 second MP3 promo ] Continue reading
Posted May 18, 2019 at hearts of space | news
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All most Americans know about Vietnam is that we fought a long and pointless war there in the 1960s and 70s. Today, if you live on the west coast, more likely than not there's a delicious Vietnamese restaurant in your community. But the ancient cultures, and the music of Southeast Asia and Vietnam in particular, is a mystery to most of us. A select group of Western composers and musicians have been drawn to these cultures, along with Southeast Asian musicians who've relocated to the West. They're creating a new fusion of traditional and contemporary music. On this transmission of Hearts of Space...subtle, exotic sounds from Vietnam, Cambodia, and Southeast Asia, on a program called ANCESTRAL VOICES 2. Music is by GRAYHAWK, LÊ TỰ CƯỜNG, PEETER VÄHI, RICHARD HOROWITZ, PHAN KIM THÀNH, VANESSA VÕ, LÊ TUẤN HÙNG & ĐẶNG KIM HIỀN, TRÍ NGUYỄN & THE ILIOS QUARTET. [ view program page ] [ view Flickr image gallery ] [ play 30 second MP3 promo ] Continue reading
Posted May 11, 2019 at hearts of space | news
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The "progressive" label is growing, and it has nothing to do with politics. In music, the term has a history that goes back to Progressive Folk in the 1930s. After that came Progressive Jazz from the 1940s to the 1970s, Progressive Rock, Pop, and Bluegrass in the 1960s, Progressive Country in the 1970s, Progressive Metal in the 1980s, and Progressive Electronic and Progressive House in the 1990s. Progressive is what happens when a genre has matured, and there's an abundance of highly skilled musicians who want to stay creatively challenged. On this transmission of Hearts of Space...if the progressive label means expanding stylistic and conceptual boundaries and synthesizing cultural influences—then I'm gonna say we're overdue for a genre—and a program—called PROGRESSIVE AMBIENT. [ view program page ] [ view Flickr image gallery ] [ play 30 second MP3 promo ] Continue reading
Posted May 3, 2019 at hearts of space | news
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The contemporary classical genre called Minimalism arrived in the middle of the 20th century as a reaction against the rigid avant-garde theories of Serialism, which threw out the tonal center and harmonic systems of a thousand years of European music. Serialism was intellectually brilliant—unfortunately, the music was ugly, tedious, and unpopular. In the 1960s, a number of American composers including LA MONTE YOUNG, TERRY RILEY, STEVE REICH, and PHILIP GLASS found their way back to tonality, with a style based on "minimal" elements: consonant harmony, static drones or a steady pulse, and slowly changing thematic motifs. Minimalism looked back and forward at the same time. Unlike Serialism, it was appealing and popular, and was eventually adopted by a number of European composers who've been featured on Hearts of Space, including MICHAEL NYMAN, GAVIN BRYARS, JOHN TAVENER, HENRYK GÓRECKI, and ARVO PÄRT. One that we missed—who must be the best-kept secret in European minimalism—is the late Dutch composer SIMEON TEN HOLT, who died in 2012. After experimenting with complex chromaticism and serialism early in his career, Ten Holt arrived at his own style of "humanized" minimalism: infused with traditional musical values, rhythmically rigorous, wonderfully melodic, and flexible in performance. His most famous piece, composed in 1976, is called CANTO OSTINATO, which in Italian means "obstinate song," a reference to its continuous, repeating quintuplet rhythm base. Its structure is based on 106 "cells" of a few phrases each which allow great latitude for repeats and interpretation by the performers. The piece can take from two hours to more than a day, and there are dozens of versions for 1, 2, 3, and 4 pianos, pianos plus organ, harp, or marimba, pipe organ, strings, and synthesizer. The piece has been a phenomenon in the Netherlands for 40 years and hundreds of sold out... Continue reading
Posted Apr 26, 2019 at hearts of space | news
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Every year at Easter, we take the opportunity to catch up on the finest sounds in sacred choral music. There's something mysterious and majestic in the sound of voices in harmony. As often in the past, we turned to guest producer ELLEN HOLMES of Adagio Recordings, who brought us a bouquet of sublime pieces from the repertoire. On this transmission of Hearts of Space, our common theme is QUIET PRAYERS. Not only Easter sacred music — but sacred music that sounds right at Easter. It comes from many countries and spans several centuries: from medieval hymns to 21st century art songs. QUIET PRAYERS...a sacred choral collection for Easter, on this edition...of Hearts of Space. Music is by DOBRI CHRISTOV (Sophia Orthodox Choir), JEAN RICHAFORT (Huelgas Ensemble), G.POPESCU-BRANESTI and PAUL CONSTANINESCU (Kontakion Choir), RIMSKY-KORSAKOV (Bulgarian Voices Angelite), ANONYMOUS (Trio Medieval), JOHN TAVENER (Anonymous 4), MORTEN LAURIDSEN (Nordic Chamber Choir), NIKOLAI KEDROV SR.(Kitka), ALEXANDER SHEREMETIEV (Academy Chorus), JOSEF KETCHAKHMADZE (St. Petersburg Chamber Choir), TOMAS LUIS de VICTORIA (Voices of Ascension), PEROTIN (Choeur Gregorien de Paris-Voix de Femmes), GUILLAUME BOUZIGNAC (Les Arts Florissants), MAURICE DURUFLÉ (Corydon Singers), ARVO PÄRT (Hilliard Ensemble and Christoph Maria Moosmann). [ view program page ] [ view Flickr image gallery ] [ play 30 second MP3 promo ] Continue reading
Posted Apr 19, 2019 at hearts of space | news
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Flying...and Floating. As a literal description of the experience, it goes back to the early days of popular electronic music and the early days of Hearts of Space. Over the years we've done programs called Floating Whispers, Floating Worlds, Floating Gardens, Floating Reveries, Floating Waves, Floating Winds, and yes, Flying and Floating 1, 2, and 3. Back then I said "flying music is rhythm-powered and moves through space, heading for worlds beyond; floating music is goal-free—ethereal, static, and timeless." You know, I can't really add anything to that. We still enjoy expanding into unlimited virtual spaces, and yearn for the quiet pleasure of weightless suspension in time. On this transmission of Hearts of Space...another journey in our electronic touring series, on a program called ELECTRON TRAVELER 4. Music is by ASCENDANT, KEVIN KELLER, ALPHA WAVE MOVEMENT, DWIGHT LOOP, MASSERGY, and ERIK WØLLO. [ view program page ] [ view Flickr image gallery ] [ play 30 second MP3 promo ] Continue reading
Posted Apr 13, 2019 at hearts of space | news
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The story of English singer/songwriter MARK HOLLIS is an inspiration to serious musicians and listeners everywhere — a lesson in 'following the muse' to a place of true creativity. Born in London in 1955, Hollis came of age in the 1970s and embarked on the mythic road to fame and fortune by starting a rock band. After a few false starts it worked, and the group TALK TALK began a short, brilliant pop music career that included several gold records in England and Europe in the 1980s. But Mark Hollis' artistic yearnings pulled him off the beaten track and into a subtle, moving and deeply contemplative space — influenced by jazz, blues, ambient and chamber music, yet sounding unlike anyone else, before or since. The two final TALK TALK albums—SPIRIT OF EDEN from 1988 and LAUGHING STOCK from 1991—plus a 1998 solo album titled simply MARK HOLLIS, are all quiet masterpieces and timeless works of art, graced by profoundly poetic lyrics and vocals from powerfully emotional...to evanescent. On this transmission of Hearts of Space, a MARK HOLLIS Retrospective called INSIDE LOOKING OUT. Mark Hollis hung up his guitar for the last time in February 2019, aged 64. This program is dedicated to his music and his memory. Info: http://users.cybercity.dk/~bcc11425 (fan site) SPIRIT OF EDEN Lyrics LAUGHING STOCK Lyrics MARK HOLLIS (solo album) Lyrics [ view program page ] [ view Flickr image gallery ] [ play 30 second MP3 promo ] Continue reading
Posted Apr 6, 2019 at hearts of space | news
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Early electronic music had a reputation for being cold, austere, and technical. That was good if that's the feeling you were trying to express, but even in those early days some electronic musicians wanted to create something altogether warmer and more "organic"—a "humanized" electronic music if you will—inspired by the beauty and complexity of the natural world, including acoustic instruments and nature sounds, but with the new and almost limitless creative possibilities of electronic sound design. I met one of those artists in the early 1980s when he was a 19 year old student at CCRMA—(they called it KARMA) Stanford University's famous Center for Computer Research in Music and Acoustics. In those days ROBERT RICH was building his own electronic instruments and studying lucid dreaming. His early work helped define and expand the scope and quality of ambient, dark-ambient, tribal and trance music. For forty years and over 40 albums, he's pursued his vision of an organic electro-acoustic music, and become a core artist for Hearts of Space. On this transmission of Hearts of Space, we focus on Robert Rich's 2019 double album TACTILE GROUND. He calls it "an exploration of the synesthesia of sound on skin"—on a program called SENTIENT TOUCH. Music is by ROBERT RICH, LORENZO MONTANA, FORREST FANG, and JEFF GREINKE. [ view program page ] [ view Flickr image gallery ] [ play 30 second MP3 promo ] Continue reading
Posted Mar 30, 2019 at hearts of space | news