This is eyong's Typepad Profile.
Join Typepad and start following eyong's activity
Join Now!
Already a member? Sign In
eyong
Recent Activity
SCAPEGOATING TRIBALISM! Since Tribalism is a speechless phenomenon it is easy to wave it arbitrarilly on the center stage of our national shame and disappointments. Mr. Amadou Ali pushes it further by calling these students 'instrumentalized vandals.' Only people blinded by the shallowness of the passing pleasure of the abuse of official powers could fail so woefully in reading the signs of time in the recent events. The student action in Buea is a statement by a new generation of Cameroonians that are tired of being pushed around by and to the whims to arm-chair administrators and mediocre leaders. That it happens in the Best University that we currently have in the country is a significant premonition of bigger acts of courage and bravery by the present generation that have learnt to know and love the taste of excellence. They have also learnt to shake off the mediocrity that has striven for years in Cameroon propagated by the abuse of official powers by the same group of leaders for more than two decades. Our Students have learnt that a mediocre generation of leaders, like those that we have now, is a lost generation because they fail to follow the bravery of their fathers and their children will not follow them down the path of shame. Our ministers may say all they want; after all they are of the lost generation, reduced to the footnote of the countless volumes of History that will recount the bravery of young Cameroonians today. We all have to make decide where we belong: on the crisp pages of the glory of a new Cameroon with the martyrs of Buea or in the footnotes of shame . The choice is now, Mr Minister! eyong
SCAPEGOATING TRIBALISM! Since Tribalism is a speechless phenomenon it is easy to wave it arbitrarilly on the center stage of our national shame and disappointments. Mr. Amadou Ali pushes it further by calling these students 'instrumentalized vandals.' Only people blinded by the shallowness of the passing pleasure of the abuse of official powers could fail so woefully in reading the signs of time in the recent events. The student action in Buea is a statement by a new generation of Cameroonians that are tired of being pushed around by and to the whims to arm-chair administrators and mediocre leaders. That it happens in the Best University that we currently have in the country is a significant premonition of bigger acts of courage and bravery by the present generation that have learnt to know and love the taste of excellence. They have also learnt to shake off the mediocrity that has striven for years in Cameroon propagated by the abuse of official powers by the same group of leaders for more than two decades. Our Students have learnt that a mediocre generation of leaders, like those that we have now, is a lost generation because they fail to follow the bravery of their fathers and their children will not follow them down the path of shame. Our ministers may say all they want; after all they are of the lost generation, reduced to the footnote of the countless volumes of History that will recount the bravery of young Cameroonians today. We all have to make decide where we belong: on the crisp pages of the glory of a new Cameroon with the martyrs of Buea or in the footnotes of shame . The choice is now, Mr Minister! eyong
It seems to me that everyone is a first year candidate into the UB Medical School, including Vice-Chancellor, the Minister and the entire system. Unless some high-minded individual are ready to sit down and structure this new department, it will soon become one more Relic of Failure in the Museum of Disappointments and Misery inaugurated by present generation of leaders. Unless an objective selection prevails, the UB school of Medicine may quickly take its place on the shelf of artifacts of illusory projects of hope of the past, that have long been mummified by the deadly vermins of centralized bureaucracy, of selfishness and of nepotism in Cameroon. Focus at this point should be on staffing, infrastructures, equipments and on a standard curriculum in Medicine worthy of speech in the International Arena of other Higher Institutions of learning.
Thank you Sister for giving us a key-hole view of the marvels taking place at the foot of Buea Mountain. I am fascinated by the Catholic schools that are excelling in public exams all over the Country. We are reaching the point where 100% at GCE O level results nolonger include 4 subjects in the result of some of these schools. The country will benefit from the wholesome education that these schools bring to our children. May be it is high time the government acknowledges more the invaluable contribution of Catholic Education in preparing Cameroons for the Challenges of Tomorrow. I hear that the government barely award subventions to these schools, making it difficult and impossible for lower class cameroons to get in. I think that the government should encourage such excellence. Who knows, may be entrusting the administration of some government schools to the Catholic Education Board may bring a fresher air of success and excellence to some public schools in the Country. We are in an age of Globalization, Efficiency and productivity...the good will of the gov't to educate future Cameroonians is not enough in itself...
N O T A B O U T S E X A N D R A P E ! ! ! We miss the point taking this story at its face value. It is not about rape or about the role of the girl, nor is it about the Pastor's intent to help her. Rather it is about abuse of power! Abuse of power occurs when someone that is weak is taken advantage of simply because they are weak. How she enjoyed the session herself cannot be raised; how she is mentally unstable cannot even be raised, if not to convict the pastor who is supposed to know more. Abuse of power is when someone who is supposed to know more brings him/herself down to the level of one that knows nothing just to have better access for selfish ends. It is possible when a rich man leave behind his 1000 sheep and goes down the street to coax the poor fellow into giving up his only ewe lamb for the rich man's table. Even if he does so 'freely' there is no justice involved! To the possibility of abuse of the weak, add the African context where there is a ritual fear of a person in position of authority - pastors, teachers, mentors, bigger neighbors, people with money and power, of an older person...and of men in general. What troubles me is not the story of Pastor Foabeh and this poor girl. Rather I am greatly disturbed by the hesitation or refusal to consider the story in this forum from the eyes of the weak, from the eyes of many children, young girls, disabled (mentally or physical), who because they cannot help themselves entrust their lives into the hand of 'more savying and respectable people' only to be subjected to the urgly face of the abuse of official powers. We can always blame the weaker party, can't we? They certainly lack the eloquence, the wit to come to this forum and to present their views or to give us a gist of the fear that accompanied each session of abuse; together with the greater fear of breaking the fearful-silence that always follows. Maybe if we begin to see things from the perspective of the victim we may come to discover more victims of Pa Foaben that have been crippled by the fear to betray a responsible person who abused them. We may also begin to see other victims tied up by our own greed, by our own lust and by our own abuse of power... Peace!