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Sylvain L.
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A more recent player dropping in! Not much playing lately but always silently reading.
Toggle Commented Jun 3, 2014 on Week One: Lurkers and Loyalists at Only a Game
1 reply
And the most moving scene of death by wire (though not on wheels) being Twixt, where Coppola reconstituted the real-life accident that lead to the death of his son while referencing both Fellini and Poe, as if his son was dead like the daughter of his protagonist (Baltimore) who, her, died like a protagonist in a Poe's novel as seen by Fellini, the whole scene being shown like a scene in a movie with Poe standing as a spectator helping Baltimore see what he cannot see by himself, a referential conundrum as vertiginous as the feeling of despair of the father losing his child...
Congratulations! As for your wish: speaking from experience, when one is gently sleeping, you can be sure that the other one is either a) having an anormal amount of energy, suddenly coming from who-knows-where or b) sick. But, hey, nothing to worry about: there's never enough nonsense around!
Toggle Commented Oct 23, 2013 on Chaos Upgrade at Only a Game
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Glad you like it! I agree with all your points, so I would just like to add: I particularly like how the story is presented. Yes, it's not as refined and subtle as Miyazaki's own movies, but it still works pretty well (some moments towards the end are really moving). We have seen before in other medias similar allegories about a young boy's acceptance of his mother's death, but it's quite refreshing in the context of our modern, ultra-violent AAA video games. Trying to deal with a single death instead of killing everyone in sight: what a reversal! And fixing broken-hearts or learning empathy by sharing emotions, actions which mirror Oliver's mourning, dealing with his own emotions; it feels really good to play a game that shows characters helping and living with each other instead of the usual bleak humans-as-beasts but with a small flicker of hope, because, you know, nuance... Empathy and sharing in a video game, it was about time!
Toggle Commented Aug 7, 2013 on Six of the Best (and Worst) of Ni No Kuni at ihobo
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Hi Chris! Although I remained silent, I followed this discussion with great interest, here and on the other blogs. I’ve been following the videogame blogging scene for about two years I think, so I have no first-hand knowledge of this golden era you’re all talking about. But I’ve been blogging for four years now, and in my experience, what you have here is more lively than anything I’ve seen in French, where bloggers rarely respond to each others (sure, there are less writers, but that could also mean closer relationships, which isn’t the case at all). It’s one of the reasons why I’m trying now to blog in English: people are conversing! Still, I think you’re right that blogging is often more isolated than what I’ve seen while looking in the backlogs of blogs I like (I did notice for instance that your comment section was far busier in your earlier posts). The BotRT at Critical Distance for example is a good initiative, for sure, but I don’t understand why they published all the links at the end of the month: if I write a post, I don’t know what the others are writing, and I can’t really respond to them because by the time I could do it the BotRT has moved on to another subject. I don’t know how was structured the original BotRT but it would be wise to announce the entries as soon as they’re ready. As it is now, the writers are doing their own things on their blogs, the theme of the month serving as an essentially superficial connection with other blogs they may not even be aware of. But Critical Distance does a pretty good job of sustaining the community, although I have a few queries. And for the social media angle, as I am an artifact with no-Facebook, no-Twitter, no-Google+, not even a cellphone, I’m quite sad to see the conversation go to places I do not like. There’s too much noise on Twitter to follow a conversation, and not much to say anyway in 144 characters. It’s a good tool to promote a blog, but a poor one for discussion. I don’t have any solution to any of this (at least we can see that this bloot is working), but anyway, from my perspective, there’s no doubt that there is an active community here (it’s true though that we see it more often in some recurrent (or shall I say repetitive) debates). Thanks for the initiative (and congratulations for the blog anniversary)!
Toggle Commented Jun 11, 2013 on Bloot Me If You Need Me at Only a Game
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I'm glad to know you're a reader, and thanks for your support!
Toggle Commented Apr 24, 2013 on A Game for the Summer at ihobo
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"Contrary to what is apparently expected, making these people racists and theocrats isn’t a justification for a one-man campaign of brutal genocide against them." Yes, this is exactly why I'm so tired of AAA games right now: they always try to justify violence by presenting the ennemy as "ultimate bad guys". I don't mind the famous ludo-narrative dissonnance of the hero-as-mass-killer in Uncharted for example, but I can't stand these kind of justification for murder, the "you can kill them because they're not good, so don't think too much about it". And recent games that try to think about the implication of virtual murder do it the wrong way: they're asking what are the consequences on the player virtually commiting these mass-killing, but they never step up and present the ennemy as something more human than a "nobody bad guy", which is the problem in the first place. Revenge is ok in the videogame universe, and nobody seems to mind. Anyway, for the recommendation: Ni No Kuni is pretty good, and no violence there!
Toggle Commented Apr 24, 2013 on A Game for the Summer at ihobo
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Hmm... I wrote a long answer yesterday about Proust and James but it seems to be stuck somewhere in some Internet limbo. Or maybe I preview it but forgot to post it! Anyway, the gist of it was: reading Proust is essential, and I would look in Essays on Radical Empirism for James.
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I had the same reaction as GracefulDave: where’s existentialism? And even before Sartre and co, William James’ radical empirism was pretty close to what you describe here, this network of interconnected relations (if I remember correctly, he even used the same image of the spider web, or maybe it was a tapestry of intertwined threads), and especially the question “who will you be?”, which is the same he would use. My knowledge of Heidegger is (very) superficial, but I’m pretty sure that his concept of Being also involves the idea of interconnection. And what about phenomenology? A conscience is defined as a conscience of something, meaning that conscience is born out of the relation between two objects. An isolated soul would have no conscience (well, no soul at all technically). I think most of the philosophy in the 20th century tried to defy individualism. Even in modern art, when you read someone like Proust, the exploration of his subjectivity is a mean to gain a better understanding of the world, and our relation to the Others; we’re far from a withdrawal from reality (and he has the best answer I know to the question "how do you know who you are"). Or we can think of Virginia Woolfe or Dos Passos, or in a sense the choral movies à la Robert Altman. Anyway, I share your point of view on the matter (on the spider web of existence I mean), but skipping the 20th century was rather daring! On this note, I will make a bit of shameless self-promotion, and invite you over to my blog (here: http://uncannypostcards.blogspot.ca/). It's on videogames for now, though, not ethics, but I think you could like it (and I’m in dire need of readers!) Thanks!
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Well, I would like to comment more often, but English is not my first language, so it's quite difficult to formulate my thoughts on philosophy here. I'm used to write about films and videogames now, but philosophy requires a certain precision, and I'm not confident enough in my writing(even this small comment took me more time than it should). Don't worry though, I will certainly read Chaos Ethics (in silence)!
Toggle Commented Feb 6, 2013 on Always Feed the Fans at Only a Game
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Well, I'm mostly a silent reader, so I guess I should come out and praise your talent now! Your writings, both on ethics and videogames, are inspiring. And I always appreciate how you answer to all your comments; it's quite rare to see this, and it's good to know that you're interested in a real dialogue, which should be the purpose of any blog.
Toggle Commented Feb 5, 2013 on Always Feed the Fans at Only a Game
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First thing first: never comment before, but frequent reader. I like your blog a lot (and your book, Imaginary Games), it seems we share the same interests, on ethics and videogames! That said: have you read William James' Will to Believe? It's a similar defense of the importance of faith in everyday life, even in non-religious situations, and a direct attack on positivism (which was new then). I think the full version is available online, it's a short essay. He uses a lot of approximations to get his point across, but I still think it's an essential read on the question (especially at the time it was written). Like him, I'm not a religious person, but I still think faith is an essential dimension of human life (and there's nothing that makes me more angry than the current trend of religion-bashing, which is never based on what a religious life actually is, always on some shallow view of what the institution of Church can be).
Toggle Commented Jul 24, 2012 on Faith in Science? at Only a Game
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Sylvain L. is now following The Typepad Team
Mar 29, 2012