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dan tdaxp
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Congrats to the happy couple!
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"Maybe all some of can really do is to do our best to pick up our own parts of the pieces. This was the only avenue left in post Roman Britain. This is the Arthur Legend in reality - an attempt to keep alive the embers of the light for another time in the future." For the analogy to hold, do you expect a die-off of around half the population?
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RE: initial conditions, is vocab size really all that important, or does its co-variance with latter-day success merely imply that both derive heavily from genetic factors? I don't have hard evidence for this q. one way or the other, but the fact that head start and similar programs typically wash out in a few years imply that what you're seeing is genetic-driven attainment, rather than something that can be improved by better preschool.
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Congratulations!
Toggle Commented Feb 13, 2008 on My 5 minutes of fame at Robert Paterson's Weblog
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This brought tears to my eyes.
Toggle Commented Feb 10, 2008 on Happy Birthday Dad at Robert Paterson's Weblog
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To summarize all of the comments, in just one "I am running through a series of otherwise arbitrary obstacles that load on both general intelligence and hard work. Succeeding at these obstacles will provide me with a degree. The ratio of time I spend now to dollars I will have to spend later for this privilege should tell you a lot about me."
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Analysis works equally well if you begin with foreign investors needing a place to generate good returns, and Americans then spending that excess capital on improving the quality of their lives.
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"In earlier credit problems, the damage was largely isolated to the sector and to the lenders - now the cancer is broad and deep." Would this be measurable? That is, would be expect the effect of S&L on GDP to be smaller than the effect of subprime? "Can Citi raise the capital? CIBC just raised a chunk - how many times to the well? When all the banks need capital - who supplies it and at what price?" Isn't this just the opposite of the "problem" that was being bewailed a year ago: that East Asians are saving too much, leading to a capital glut? I assume that problem didn't just go away -- rather, it seems we have a high level of worldwide investment, a medium level of liquidity, and therefore the natural friction that entails. This seems like the same process of creative destruction that operates in any capitalist system: people make stupid choices; the sector with a critical load of stupid choices is hammered. Capital flows somewhere else. Repeat.
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"What we are seeing is acceleration in damage both in financial services and in the media - look for acceleration as the sign that we are getting close" To say accelerating, wouldn't you have to show that not only the subprime mess is being than the S&L scandal, but the difference in those is bigger than between the S&L scandal and a similar financial perturbation from the 1950s or 1960s?
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Excellent post! Fantastic to read! (And thanks for the kind words!) Considering the heritability of traits, few policies would be more sensible than castrating violent criminals. In the same way, few eugenics programs for our canine friends make sense so much as their adjustment to apartment living. I have to imagine this is under way. I have to imagine there is money in it. One comment: "If we are how long will it take for most people to be so neotonous that we cannot cope with what life and nature has in store?" A human would not last as long as a chimp in a jungle. But no chimp has ever said, "Cut this jungle down" and seen it fall and burn.
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Absolutely agree wrt Islamic microstates in Europe [1] I linked to your post, btw [2] [1] http://catholicgauze.blogspot.com/2007/04/united-caliphates-of-europe-powerpoint.html [2] http://www.tdaxp.com/archive/2008/01/02/race-wars.html
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Devolution in the Core (the status of residents of Scotland as citizens of both the United Kingdom and the European Union) is rather different from a race-way in Kenya. The modernist idea of the nation-state is clearly disintegrating -- into broader political communities in Europe and into smaller tribes in Africa.
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Devolution in the Core (the status of residents of Scotland as citizens of both the United Kingdom and the European Union) is rather different from a race-way in Kenya. The modernist idea of the nation-state is clearly disintegrating -- into broader political communities in Europe and into smaller tribes in Africa.
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An easy guess, unfortunately. http://soobdujour.blogspot.com/2007/12/benazir-bhutto.html#c8641179110686461059
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Rob, Interesting! Thanks for the info on provincial powers in Canada! Re: the Tea Party, my understanding was that the "tax" was designed to impose a monpoly, so the East India company's profits would increase simultaneous with running everyone else out of business. Yankee ingenuity in the service of Yankee markets, Yankee freedom, and Yankee choice: E Pluribus Unum, baby! :-)
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"Have an Atlantic Alliance with the other Provinces and add a punitive tax to the supermarkets that do not mainly source locally and at a fair price for the grower" A question: would this be lawful in Canada? I know that has been unconsitutional in the "liberated zone" of North America since 1789, but I'm not sure of the laws for those under the Queen's yoke...
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Likewise without going into detail, I'd submit that an opposition to an institutions and its policies is quite different from an opposition to institutions as such. Early Christianity -- that is, at the time of Jesus and Paul -- secularly resembles nothing so much as a 4GW insurgency, and a successful one at that. http://www.tdaxp.com/archive/2006/03/30/jesusism-paulism-introduction-the-revolution-of-early-christ.html
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"I agree entirely with you Dan" Thank you :-) but I'm not sure I agree with you. You made a positive claim ("Jesus was so anti institution that he was killed by it") that needs to be supported. Historical inference argues against your claim. Are you arguing from textual grounds?
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Robert, "Jesus makes it clear that God needs no building or organization" "Jesus was so anti institution that he was killed by it" At least in the New Testament, these claims are problematic. Clearly God needs to building or organization, but God needs nothing. He is complete in himself. Regarding institutions, Christ (and His followers) were aware and supportive of the power of offices. Jesus himself was a Priest of Melchizedek -- indeed, he could not have been a Levite Priest becaues of the Law (which he completed and fulfilled, but did not replace). Indeed the events of Easter rendered superfluous the requirement for Temple sacrifices. Immediately following his death, his discipes acted as if their positions were that of office-holders, replacing those who drop out (either through betrayal or martyrdom). Shortly thereafter, Saint Paul is describing the requirements for Bishops, which include minimal qualifications that are both qualitative and quantitative. While there are minor Christian denominations that hold a strictly anti-institutionalist views, such a take is not supported by the majority of the Christian community, the Christian Bible, or the secular history of the first centuries.
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Wow, can't believe I missed you at the conference. Hopefully next year we can link-up.
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