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TexasTwittHR
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Great post, Kris. I hear ya and I'm all for accountability and ownership, but this can be a slippery slope. Not sure that I necessarily want to "own" some of the poor decisions that "they" and "we" make, to be completely honest with you. So, I would argue, that there may be three buckets here. There's the stuff that we (people managers) need to own, there's the stuff that we (people managers) blame on someone else (manager pass-through) and then there's the crap that we just try to distance ourselves from altogether. And that line between the last two is a very thin line.
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Leaving a plan/portfolio? You're gonna like the way you look. I guarantee it!
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Great post, Kris. I interviewed with Amazon years ago for a HR Director role in Dallas, but went all the way through the interview process in Seattle. Very unique interview process (bar raisers), to say the least. At the end of the day, I didn't get the nod. It was disappointing at the time, but there is clearly a reason for everything. What you've described does not sound like a good time and it's not what I'm about. Just one more example of "everything that glitters isn't gold".
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Great post, Kris! Err...I mean, well done. No...wait! What I really mean is that I found your post to be interesting and the subject matter really resonated with me because I think there is a fine line between providing good, effective praise and blowing sunshine you know where. :) As it goes with any feedback, positive or constructive, it should be specific. It's great to hear "good job", but good job for what?
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Great post, Kris. I'm sorry for the loss in your community. Your son was fortunate to have the friend and mentor he had in your neighbors' son.
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I'm all for progressive HR, but there are some things that just shouldn't be messed with and the employee-manager relationship is one of them (in my opinion). I think the energy and focus should be placed on building manager capability around things like accountability, performance management, tough conversations, candor, etc. Putting an employee's fate in the hands of their peer group is just asking for trouble. Too many bad things can happen.
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Save Ferris has my vote. Classic movie and the just has a nice ring to it. It's like a rally cry. Another new option - Frankie Say Relax. Seems fitting for a lot of the HR stuff you may have to deal with from time to time. Another option - Our Time. A reference to Fast Times and Mr. Hand.
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Great post, Kris. Reminds me of the scene from "Moneyball" when the scouts are in the conference room talking about the players' girlfriends. A's Scout: "I like Perez." A's Scout: "He's got an ugly girlfriend. Ugly girlfriend means no confidence."
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Great post, Kris. "Ballers ball" - love it. Will be my new mantra. it reminds me of "coffee is for closers". Thanks to the smartphone, we can always be "on" and there's no good excuse for not seeing THE email. I cannot count the number of fires that I've put out "after hours" over email/text. We can nip it in the bud tonight or let it blow up in the morning. The choice is ours.
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Oh the tangled web we weave... You're spot on with your line of questioning. What a mess.
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Conceptually, I like the idea of ROWE. In practice, I think there are too many unique characteristics about most of our organizations that make it nearly impossible to effectively implement it. Real or perceived, I think most organizations have too many "hurdles" to overcome to bring it to life. Now earning the right to a ROWE? That is an interesting concept, but to your point Kris, you'd have to have a solid grip on employee performance and the stomach to deal with the whining that is sure to happen when employees have not earned the right to ROWE. Another interesting thought is rotational ROWE. Consider the 9/80 work schedule. Employee works nine days and gets one day off. What if you rotated a ROWE? A quarter on, quarter off, quarter on, quarter off...across the entire employee population. I can poke holes in this arrangement as well...just a thought.
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Based on the video, I'd terminate. The dude didn't even attempt to find a solution to the problem (look for another accessible entrance, ring the buzzer, get the homeowner's attention, etc.). He did nothing. He walked up and threw the package over as casually as if he was throwing the morning paper on a paper route. At least fake it - look around, pace, make it look like you've got a plan B. I get the fact that these guys have a schedule to keep, bu this shows blatant disregard for the customer's shipment. Surely there's a policy/process in place for how to handle this type of scenario.
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In my opinion, all of us would prefer to have rules and parameters in place, even the slackers. Most of us want to know where we stand in the eyes of our managers and leaders. As with so much of what we do as HR pros, it's an art and not a science. Answers to this kind of question (that Kris alludes to in his original post) should provide enough "directional" data to be relevant and worthwhile when evaluating the culture of an organization.
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Guess it just goes to show...all that glitters ain't gold.
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I don't know man...this trailer looks pretty funny. Admittedly, I laughed out loud a few times. Looks like "Office Space" meets "9 to 5" (remember that old flick with Dabney Coleman, Jane Fonda, Dolly Parton, Lily Tomlin?). This one's definitely on my list. I'm gonna go watch it again :) Seth
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Just more proof that HR is not for the faint of heart. Not everyone has what it takes to make it in this game. Love it or hate it, the game has to be played. Might as well be good at it!
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Thanks for the reply, KD. That does make sense. Perhaps we should start with measuring/calculating our turnover first and take it from there. :) Seth
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I'm with you on this one. I find it quite embarrassing when I happen to see the same stock photos on multiple sites, but different organizations. I have to believe that's what it would feel like to show up at a party wearing the exact same red dress that someone else is wearing. Not that I wear red dresses. Or dresses at all. It's an analogy. Nevermind... Here's a great example of a company that "gets it". Check out the 'careers' site for Woot (subsidiary of Amazon) - http://www.woot.com/jobs.aspx. I love their heading. "It's not just a job - it's paid employment". I'll check out their job postings from time to time just to get a good chuckle. Seth
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I don't care who you are...that's funny! ...and it might just work.
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I couldn't help but go back and watch this clip from Airplane, between "Murdoch" and Joey. Funny how life imitates art. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wj5F0vT_dWo Kareem needs to get over himself.
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Great post...thanks for sharing your thoughts! As a dad who's working hard to build a successful career and working hard to be an engaged/involved father, I can relate to everything you discussed. I completely agree that this is the new "glass ceiling" and that this is something our work generation will wrestle with for some time. Not sure what the answer is, but like most things, I think it comes down to decisions and choices that we each have to make and the willingness to live with the consequences.
I've said it once and I'll say it again...with respect to sexual harassment, perception is reality. Your comments around the 'lowest common denominator' are dead on. I can't count how many times I've coached managers on the fact that just because YOU don't find the behavior/comment offensive doesn't mean that someone else won't find it offensive.
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Here in our world, we call that "No results and a story". The bigger the job, the bigger the accountability and the higher the stakes.
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Great post and an incredible video. I had not seen the clip or heard the story of Shaka Smart. I'm impressed. I've always been a big believer in leaders who "walk the talk" and who don't ask their people to do that which they are unable/unwilling to do themselves. Has a bit of 'servant leadership' quality to it that also resonates with me.
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