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TmjUtah
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I recently looked over some accounts of the passing of the Whigs. The establishment Republicans deserve to go the same way.
Toggle Commented Sep 8, 2011 on Thinking Too Much About America at Cobb
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If Tea Party folk aren't simply racist morons then they must be engaged in the debate on where government ends and tyranny begins. I don't find it surprising at all that the tyrants and their beneficiaries would rather continue to call me a racist moron. Pretty simple stuff.
Toggle Commented Sep 3, 2011 on Andre Carson: Strike Two at Cobb
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Rule One of Riding The Dragon: 1. Remember, it's a dragon. China's objective for power projection is local. In my opinion a cursory look at their naval build history over the last decade and current production in the yards and it is starkly clear they intend to be able to put boots on the ground where they want, when they want, any place between the Indonesian archipelago to the Siberian coast. I do not think that the military tech gap is nearly as wide between China and the US as the punditry and trade classes present. Long term, dedicated intelligence gathering penetrations in our manufacturing, higher ed, and engineering, and (most importantly) political institutions by Chinese state organs is so accepted that the situation isn't even newsworthy any more. Automation and controls for industry is dual use for military applications, and I don't think that the Chinese are nearly limited to tee shirts, track shoes, and garden tools as things they build well. China has built the kind of sea lift capability unknown on the planet since the end of WW2. They can put shooters AND logisticians on the ground where the blue water meets the beach. The known examples of their latest generations of missile and torpedo tech are designed to kill U.S. carrier task forces. They build in volume and are primarily interested in areas within the range of their continental air and missile umbrella. I don't know what China wants. That's okay; no American diplomat has ever called them right before. Capabilities are what you plan for. Intentions are always a mystery.
Toggle Commented Aug 14, 2011 on The China Outlook at Cobb
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It used to be the Unicorn and Rainbow crowd could pretend it was enlightened social policy coupled with the dollar being so darn convenient as the world currency that kept Europe and Asia free of war, even if the adults knew it had a lot more to do with KH satellites, boomers, and all those nukes on missiles that would actually hit what they were aimed at. No more dollar standard, and I just don't see The Won being much of a deterrent as long as his ass is being kicked by Muammar Khaddafy. Hang on to your hat.
Toggle Commented Aug 8, 2011 on Here's a Trend I Understand at Cobb
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The folks who sat in the executive offices of Fannie and Freddie on the eve of the collapse know exactly where our congress critters are sitting right this second. "We're done. The numbers are simply too big, and our actions too criminal...". The Won, on the other hand, sees default as a phase line on the way to "victory".
Toggle Commented Jul 30, 2011 on Simplicity at Cobb
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I would be happy to help you out with that sniper rifle thing, should you ever be in the neighborhood. Just give me a day or two warning to get the time arranged. Thanks for putting your post-50 ruminations into such effective words.
Toggle Commented Jul 23, 2011 on The Old Man Statement at Cobb
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I do not stand in the "smart" set of your readers but did you consider the possibility that there exists a kulak strata in your feudal order of affairs? And, if it did, what kind of position they might find themselves in about now? You are a kulak, you know. I'm not, and wish I had taken the step up... you are self directing, self aware, and an agent of change. It's that last quality - or property - that will put you in the most danger. Your peasant theory works for for me. You watch the status quo closely enough and you could probably find a cable show called "Let's Redistribute Wealth!" You are spot on on peasants wanting somebody else to do the killing. What they never remember is that when the King falls, the road to the chopping block is always paved with a lot of dead peasants.
Toggle Commented Jun 29, 2011 on Getting Truth's Pants On at Cobb
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New literacy. Old literacy. Somebody has to pay for it all. That will be what the world focuses on in our near future. The check is on the table and I don't think offering to wash dishes is going to do the job for Western Civ.
Toggle Commented Jun 22, 2011 on The New Literacy at Cobb
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Happy Birthday, sir. You have achieved fifty with a much larger measure of satisfaction than I have. Good on ya.
Toggle Commented Jun 4, 2011 on Impatience & Wisdom at Cobb
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I am intrigued that you still cling to your opinion that he's screwing up. Right of return? It's the closest we've seen to a transparently honest policy statement in two years and change. Oh, and how 'bout that war powers act move today? Wasn't that sweet? Our "limited" involvement - that is, the fiction that some other "political committee" is calling the shots - absolves the Won from the statute. And Congress will just bite their lip and hope they get good press. We have the worst political class ever. This shit makes "Plan 9 From Outer Space" look like Olivier and Burton. Well, evil is as evil does. Let us see how the slope down to election 2012 takes shape.
Toggle Commented May 21, 2011 on Let's All Go Back to 1967! at Cobb
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I think the power of the state is the cause of most current dysfunctions in family and community, status quo. Liberals and .... trust? I think you missed clean on that one. Authority... maggie's drawers there, too. If there's anyone trying to micromanage individuals I'd point to the food/tobacco/freedom/thought police first. If Ashcroft was half the fascist Holder is, we'd already have had our pitchforks and ropes moment. Conformity. Don't know where you went with that one. The only conformity I seek is the other guy's fist to stop before my nose. History. The greatest obstacle to progressive agendas that can exist. It's been tried, it's failed, and no, you don't get another chance on my dime to try to get it right... I don't think they "institutionalize". The rewrite, but learn? Nope. Progress. Don't know where you were going with this one, either. Progress is feeding more people per arable acre. Progress is trading with the neighbors instead of slaughtering them and living on the plunder. Progress is having the time to think beyond the moment instead of crouching in the cold dark, hoping to not become a statistic before dawn. How the do you measure "diversity", or even better, assign "value" to the concept? More importantly, how do "they", the "Liberals", do it? All that "defend and expand" beyond the basic freedoms of life, liberty, and pursuit of happiness trend directly to redistribution and tyranny. It's that history thing again. People are people. Policy based on what somebody wishes people were like is just sad. We are savages who have glimpsed a chance to be noble. But don't make the mistake of putting that "noble" anywhere closer to the "savage". Maybe someday. Like another 5000 years or so. Most likely not, because once we aren't savages at our core, we'll fall to somebody else who is. Just my opinion.
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So if I understand the math here, I'm not black so the only criticism AT ALL that I can level at Mr. Obama is race - based? Thanks for clearing that up. Personally I always thought it was the socialist agenda and the blatant disregard for the oath he took that I was uncomfortable with. Guess I'm just trapped in this cracker Walmart shopping strata of life. Thanks for telling me why I believe things. Or not. Rather more than "not", actually. Reality based? Comic book demagogues. 2012 can't come soon enough.
Toggle Commented Apr 25, 2011 on Apeshit at Cobb
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I'm just into the opening chapters of "From Dawn to Decadence". Hoo boy. I am concerned about moral decay. I am pretty worried about supply chain collapse. I am terrified of currency collapse - which I believe is decades overdue. That the Chinese own most of our debt doesn't make me feel any better. Lots of people proclaimed that Europe wouldn't have a war in 1914 because it didn't make sense economoically. Those Chinese fellers have built a military designed to fight a land war in Asia. And they are also establishing satellite and comms infrastructure to do it on par with the best we can bring to the field in the way of brilliant weapons and delivery systems. Not saying they have intentions, but the smart strategy is always to look at capabilities. Honestly, who can take a dollar seriously when gold is above a thousand dollars an ounce and the Treasury keeps on printing? Or when they look at our political class? It is to laugh.
Toggle Commented Apr 19, 2011 on Abandoned Amusement Parks at Cobb
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"Take your oldest son with you because a gunshow is an interesting cultural phenomenon as well as a unique sales and marketing extravaganza. Since these usually go for a full weekend, be prepared to go on saturday and sunday and pick up as much literature, information, and networking connections as you're able." I agree with Sub. That is all good advice. If you are looking for ammo deals, you must be near first in the door on opening day. I am not into guide guns - the big bore lever actions. They have a purpose but if you aren't routinely shooting Kodiaks inside your tent they are heavy and I do not find them very fun to shoot. Most folks I see shooting them at the range use down-charged cartridges. Factory ammo is pretty steep, too. Talk to you lawyer about legal liabilities associated with self defense. Call your homeowner's insurance provider after that and purchase a liability rider on top of what you have now. Whatever you buy, you load with FACTORY ammunition for carry or home defense. Find out what flavor of ammo your local LEO's carry and use it. Never load your own carry loads, never use reloaded ammo except to train or for SHTF. If using shotgun, use at least #4 buckshot in standard loads for twelve gauge, magnum for twenty, or slugs. Don't use birdshot. Never have less than a hundred rounds per weapon on hand. Buy a locking rack, cabinet, or safe first, before you buy a weapon. Ammo gets stored separately; your option on whether or not to put it in a locked container. I used a padlocked artillery fuze can bolted to the floor in the back of a closet back when we lived in an apartment in California. Nothing wrong with a Mossberg and an SKS in reserve. I understood the appeal of the SKS back when they were around a hundred bucks a pop. Not any more, though, not since you can buy a gently used Marlin .30-30 and have slightly superior ballistics, better range, better sights, and more ammo choices for less than what silly prices the SKS's are at now. There is always Rule One, and it must be obeyed. I don't have an opinion on what you should buy for a rifle. I own an AR carbine primarily for my daughters' use. It's a damned good platform but the caliber of the round is deficient. The 5.56mm NATO was designed for use by a fighter connected to organic crew served weapons in his platoon access to supporting arms via radio links. Having an AR makes a lot of sense for a family... especially with a shotgun or .30cal in support. Just buy a spare parts kit for your AR (and two extra extractors if you shoot steel case Russian ammo like I do. Never had a problem, but some folks claim the steel cases are hard on extractors.) I don't like AK's because I hate spending six hundred dollars for two hundred dollars worth of parts and even though the ammo is relatively cheap, it is heavy and tends to get used real fast. I am fifty. I don't have a combat optic sight for my AR but am beginning to wish I did. I've spoken with scores of returned Soldiers and Marines and they swear by Trijicon and the holograph sight systems. You can buy a Marlin lever action rifle in .38 Special/.357 Magnum and a Ruger revolver chambered the same and have a Cowboy tactical set up that works on deer, too. One big plus to this combination is that neighbors/friends/ will not look at your lever gun and think "gun nut". Unless, of course, you get a badge, a nickname, a coach gun, and a hat, and go Single Action Shooting once a month. As long as you are trolling gun shows, you might keep an eye out for an example of the "Timberwolf". These were pump action carbines in .357/.38 Israeli Military Industries produced until sometime in the late nineties. They will handle the strongest .357 loads you care to shoot and are quite adequate out to around a hundred fifty yards. If you step up to a full power .30 caliber (.308, .30-06, 7.62x54R) you are in rifleman territory. You will not experience the full benefit of the weapon unless you are willing to invest quite a bit of time and a fair chunk of change learning how to hit what you aim at out to at least 300 yards. My barnyard rule of thumb for casual rifle shooters is that they should achieve consistent sub - 12" groups over iron sights at 300 yards. If you can do that from prone or from a bench, you are doing okay. I don't suggest .30 caliber as a primary family weapon because it will be too much for somebody just picking it up. I have an M1 Garand in the safe that has served me well for twenty years but the rifle that goes in the boot of the pickup is a Mosin Nagant M91/58 carbine. On the sling is a pouch with thirty factory hunting rounds on stripper clips. I am perfectly comfortable with the prospect I might carry it into a fight. If it gets stolen or goes into evidence, I'm out a hundred bucks and the rifle. Until I get home and pick up the other one. My firearms won't get me through years of post-apocalyptic struggle. My neighborhood, my food storage, my first aid supplies and training, and my family are there for the long haul. The guns are just another tool we can use to get to the next sunrise. May not ever need to use one in earnest. But I'll keep the option, thanks.
Toggle Commented Apr 19, 2011 on Staring Down the Barrel at Cobb
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Ruger Mk II or similar target .22, absolutely. Before dropping serious cash on any defense caliber pistol (>/= 9mm para) make the rounds of your shooting friends or ranges providing rentals and find out what makes sense for you now. Nothing wrong with a snubbie but you might just find out that a full frame nine like the Beretta is more trouble than it is worth. Or not. I've been shooting since childhood and spent a few years learning and putting into practice just how the Marine Corps does things with weapons. I've loaded my own rounds since 1990. Collected and shot post - 1900 military rifles and pistols for decades. And I've been carry concealed legally since the mid '90s. If this background skews my point of view pretty far to the "be REALLY prepared" side of the debate, it should come as no surprise. Whatever you decide to do, please satisfy Rule One. Then practice like you mean it and hopefully never have to put practice into practical. If you have specific questions on tech or spec, you can always email me. My answers get short when opinion or philosophy isn't involved. Promise.
Toggle Commented Apr 17, 2011 on Staring Down the Barrel at Cobb
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Nakajima_Kikka, I hope you and yours are okay and in a good position to make it through this tragedy. This is going to sound like I'm temporizing, I know, but I unconsciously based the statement you quoted on my deeply held conviction that the coming catastrophic event most likely to afflict California isn't going to have a lot to do with tectonics. Americans have generally behaved well (actually behaved better than media narratives, really) in natural disasters, and I hope for that trend to continue. With the decadence across our society being exacerbated by failed redistributionist policies and with California being the state most likely to discover that you can't spend like the Feds if you can't print money, I think that the tipping point where some return to public fiscal policy has been passed long, long ago. The tension generated by literally decades of government by swindle and payoff to client classes in the pot metal state is going to come lose in a manner that makes an 8.0 earthquake look tame. In that situation, people will be much, much less inclined to extend trust outside their immediate circle. All you can do is try to prepare for the worst you can reasonably expect to experience.
Toggle Commented Apr 17, 2011 on Abandoned Amusement Parks at Cobb
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I forgot to add the FM walkie/talkies (pack batteries in unopened packages in bag) and the solar/crank multiband radio that lives in my bag. My wife carries a USB with critical contact and records information. I only do the contacts, medical information, and account numbers and am not very good at staying current. I am looking at solar chargers small enough for the cell phones but will get by with the crank radio for now. In Utah channel six (middle band) is almost the same as nineteen used to be on CB. Establish a primary and alternate rally points for your family to gather in case of emergency. Many survival situations go south quickly because victims surrender conscious action to panic. If you drum it into their heads that "when things go to hell you must meet HERE"... you may just provide them with the tool they need to get over the first hump. I think I still have a "DON'T PANIC" button around here somewhere; if I could find more, I'd put one on the flap of every go bag in the family.
Toggle Commented Apr 17, 2011 on Abandoned Amusement Parks at Cobb
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You live in the Greater LA County area. You face the same engineering challenge the nuke plant designers in Japan did. In planning for "worst case scenario" you really have no upper limit, you must pick an arbitrary point at which you can prepare for but still accept that "worst case" is very likely to exceed your level of preparation. I believe California is morphing to a third world existence but you are your own best judge of your local situation. ""In a big catastrophe, I figure that the best place for me to take my family is up into the hills south of my house. I know a couple families up that way, it's a rich community and probably more prepared for seige than the rest of the town. Plus it's adjacent to the Port of LA which will has some Coast Guard and other military facilities. It would be a strategic joint to get secured and a good place to cadge supplies / make contacts. " If there is no power, if the supply chain has broken, if there is no food, you will not find people amenable to "making contacts". Much better you have several known destinations where people should be expecting or at least not averse to your showing up should you find it necessary to leave your residence. Your go bags must include at a minimum personal food, water, and meds for 72 hours. One light jacket, one poncho, one LED flashlight, with extra batteries, one cigarette lighter, one candle lantern, one quality knife, one multi tool, and I put a cannister of Bear spray in each of ours. When we lived in Los Angeles twenty years ago we kept water (three gallons per person per day plus a gallon for the cat for two weeks - LA is a desert), food, meds, first aid, our basic camping load out (tent/bags/stove/tarps) and forty gallons of gas plus a second spare tire for the pickup on hand in our garage. The forty gallons of gas was intended to get us east out of LA county since my wife had family up near Grass Valley. We were very paycheck to paycheck at the time, too, but tried to keep five hundred dollars cash on hand. We called it "running money". Today we keep about two hundred gallons of water between the house and garage and cycle it continuously. We also have a couple of Katydin (sp?) filters for the GoBags plus some osmosis distillers that are seriously last resort items. And I still keep about twenty gallons of fuel on hand, and make sure to keep that supply no older than six months. A simple natural disaster - most likely an earthquake - back in our LA days would easily have meant up to a couple of weeks on our own resources. We prepared for that. We felt that that was doable in our neighborhood. We knew at least our immediate neighbors, and even though we were close to a freeway and bound by Pico Rivera and Whittier, we weren't directly on a secondary connector road. My experience working for a civil engineering firm out of Santa Fe Springs convinced me early on that getting out of the Basin during an emergency would be impossible without a helicopter or something tracked with a blade on the front of it. My perception of the culture at that time was that people would rise to the challenge of an earthquake; they always had before. That was then, this is now, and I'm glad we moved when we did. I never considered the Basin as a long term option, even then. Now I am making book on how many more of our California friends end up in Arizona or here, in Utah. We know almost all of our neighbors and some of those that rent nearby. This morning we assisted in our annual Ward cleanup. Even back in the LA days I had an M1 Garand for me and a Mossberg 500 for the wife and pistols for both of us. I keep extra ammo and components on hand for barter purposes, and am considering picking up a case of liquor for the same reason even though we've been dry the past ten years. Our home is where we will survive. The lot is big enough to camp on and still garden effectively. Being prepared means being prepared to survive. Your local conditions will dictate whether that means having to put some twinkies in the basement or going all out to get ready for a Zombie apocalypse. Even if you cannot see a need for a weapon in your bug out gear, please do remember that when you NEED one, you will probably not be able to GET one. YMMV. Good luck.
Toggle Commented Apr 16, 2011 on Abandoned Amusement Parks at Cobb
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"Is it possible to reign in government, with all of its' codified, institutionalized structures? Is it possible to strip away the extra costs that laws, lawyers, lawmakers and judges leech off the economy? I doubt it, because the topic never comes up." Amen. And just possibly the topic never comes up because instead of addressing human nature, we instead stop short and instead must first wade through a thousand skirmishes on race, philosophy, and agendas... wastes of time that benefit only those vested in continuing the economic charade we have created. Where there are markets and resources there are services and products. We in the United States have allowed the most dire of the Founders' worries to manifest in that government is long past serving the People and is become tyranny. I do not call our government evil because it would be like calling the tiger who takes a child at night evil. Government unrestrained assumes power and control to the extent it can. We, the people, have failed in our primary duty to the state... to be alert and to restrain the state. It is the nature of the tiger to eat what crosses its path. It is the nature of the State to control. We need to have that discussion; needed to have it shortly after FDR, but there you go. We are only human.
Toggle Commented Apr 11, 2011 on Crumbs at Cobb
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I'd just like to point out that in 2011 the United States is actually indebted some debatable quantity of trillions of dollars to the nation most likely to be an opponent in war... unlike in 1939, when we actually chose which side we were going to be on for that war. I substantially agree with unclemrsgols' suggested remedies. But my caveat is that those solutions are all merely mechanical or book keeping acts, where the real problem is based in moral and character defects of our society as a whole. It's behavior not rules that we are killing ourselves with. We've pretended that "freedom" means "freedom from consequences" for way too long. Surrender freedom for security and pretty soon you have neither. Our banking, government, and investment systems are in collapse. Stimulus, QE, or whatever other silliness foisted by those desperate political class animals hasn't done a single thing to address the issues at the heart of our disaster. They are just putting on bigger shoes to try to kick the can a little further.
Toggle Commented Apr 10, 2011 on Crumbs at Cobb
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Thanks for the civil and reasoned response. I agree that living beyond means is the key element, and I agree with you about the timeline beginning around the early eighties, where individual citizens are concerned. Government has been kiting checks since before either of us was born. But... The regulation - over regulation - of the mortgage and financial industries set up the fall that was to follow. Lowered lending standards coupled with government guarantees set the spring on the trap that closed in 2008. I know that this is a simplistic statement, and that devolution of moral and ethical standards across society also play crucial roles in where we find ourselves. The point I was trying to make in my original statements was that prior to this administration, politicians played mostly to narratives. Now we have a true to the cause revolutionary, and he and his team have executed their plan to the hilt. Now we see how much of free America is left after a century of progressivism. We can still come back via elections. Sure we can. But I'm not betting on it going that way. Have a fine day.
Toggle Commented Apr 8, 2011 on Justice Denied at Cobb
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We elected a figurehead. But a figurehead with a script, and we elected him concurrently with the absolute worst political class we've ever installed in both houses of Congress. Cloward-Piven and Alinsky base their strategies on forcing the enemy to live by moral and legal restrictions. I have watched the last two weeks while congress tugs and postures on whether they'll cut 32 billion or 60 billion from whatever budget agreement they are working on. That's like discussing how to help a rape victim while watching the tenth man climb on. In church. In two years the real, physical burden of government has been increased by a factor of at least four - EPA/FDA/IRS/DHS/FDA/FCC/ and scores of other new agencies we don't even know about yet. We have made the Federal government the sole provider of education funding. We can't drill our own oil... but we'll subsidize Brazil. We will spend a billion dollars in strategic assets to FAIL to remove a dictator... and then pretend that "NATO" doesn't mean U.S. weapons, command, and control. Our DOJ has evolved into the "fixer" for the Obama administration that Nixon only dreamed of with his cabinet. Obamacare isn't supposed to fix health care or save money. It is, and always has been, intended to generate litigation and become yet another financial drain on a government already four laps beyond dead broke. We don't have any money. We haven't for decades, but now the exacerbation of this reality is exactly the objective aimed at with both earnest intent and deadly malice by this administration. It's a coup. Not an administration. And yes, I am mad as hell. But not raving. Just waiting to vote, and hoping that it might matter.
Toggle Commented Apr 7, 2011 on Justice Denied at Cobb
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Cobb, be real. Gonzalez was a Republican. We can't be having any of this silly "precedent" stuff, especially not if it inconveniences a designated victim class. America bad! Imperial pale America (and their brown lackeys like Gonzalez) double plus ungood! You can't bring down a Republic that contains a strong middle class. The eighties were a nightmare for the Left; too many people keeping their own money, getting off the dole and getting into the middle class. That great question of "color" fading ever so slightly while folks got on with getting to work. Fannie, Freddie, and Welfare saved the day, though... and getting more than half the country to get paid by the IRS every year AND have them hate the "rich" who actually paid the IRS... well, that was a nifty trick, too. The miracle of public education on display. Bill Ayers was right. Half of the Gitmo crew are going to walk away from Cuba free men. Probably with apologies from a contrite Eric Holder, possibly even a prime time event hosted by the President. They will put a few in jail forever - but no death penatlies, of course. Piss off the Americans who still lean Jackson. A double for their money - now the "Free Mumia" club will have more cards to mail at Ramadan, too. Let some of these animals go on technicalities, and Teh Narrative that the system is flawed is supported. You know, like our economy is in collapse because THE MARKET or CAPITALISM doesn't work ... in the face of the reality that we live in the most regulated, taxed, and over-lawyered financial arena in history. Nothing this administration does is intended for any purpose beyond destroying the system that exists. Clue: When Eric Holder looks down to Guantanamo, he's looking at HIS people.
Toggle Commented Apr 6, 2011 on Justice Denied at Cobb
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The current program in DC has gone so far passed "... run out of other peoples' money" that the above list will happen on its own in the not too distant future. We're broke. There is not "there" there, and there are no ruby shoes or unicorn farts to mitigate the debt we have imposed on our grandkids' futures. We get to start paying. It's not an optional thing.
Toggle Commented Mar 30, 2011 on A Simple Presidential Checklist at Cobb
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He made a TV appearance because that's what Presidents are supposed to do when they kill people overseas. NATO has the keys after Wednesday. Make no mistake, it will still be our money, our equipment, our C3 and logistics, and our people doing the job. But after Wednesday, all questions will be referred to NATO, because they are "in charge". He'll get away with it, too. Democrats concentrating on trying to win their individual elections, Republicans incapable of taking off the Brooks Brothers and picking up the pitchforks, and establishment media still carrying two buckets in each hand for the AA hire they saw through the maze. We are in a lot of trouble.
Toggle Commented Mar 30, 2011 on Community Organizer of the Free World at Cobb
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