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William Snyder
Visiting Assistant Professor of Law at Syracuse University College of Law.
Recent Activity
In a few days, this blog will move from the hosting service we have used since 2006 to a completely new platform on our own servers. We make this move in order to integrate the blog with the rest of our services at www.cybersecuritylaw.us. The downside is that all links... Continue reading
Posted Aug 8, 2012 at Crossroads
Course is October 1 to November 18, 2012 Once again, the Institute for National Security and Counter-Terrorism (INSCT) will be offering the online course "Cyber Security Law and Policy," which tackles one of the most critical national security threats of our time. INSCT is an innovative interdisciplinary research center that addresses key national and international challenges of security, terrorism and counterterrorism, post-conflict reconstruction, and community resilience. Established at Syracuse University College of Law in 2003 through Director and Professor William C. Banks' vision, the Institute's mission is to advance student-based research, analytical proficiency, education, and public service on law and... Continue reading
Course is October 1 to November 18, 2012 Once again, the Institute for National Security and Counter-Terrorism (INSCT) will be offering the online course "Cyber Security Law and Policy," which tackles one of the most critical national security threats of our time. INSCT is an innovative interdisciplinary research center that... Continue reading
Posted Aug 2, 2012 at NS-TIC
Course is October 1 to November 18, 2012 Once again, the Institute for National Security and Counter-Terrorism (INSCT) will be offering the online course "Cyber Security Law and Policy," which tackles one of the most critical national security threats of our time. INSCT is an innovative interdisciplinary research center that... Continue reading
Posted Aug 2, 2012 at Crossroads
In an editorial entitled “Cybersecurity at Risk” published in the print edition on August 1, 2012, the New York Times argues: The Lieberman-Collins bill should be voted by the Senate this week and then merged with the House version so a law can be enacted this year. If not, and... Continue reading
Posted Aug 1, 2012 at Crossroads
The ABA's Standing Committee on Law and National Security has just released a sequel to its first book on national security legal topics. The first book, Patriot Debates, focused heavily on the USA Patriot Act. The second book, Patriots Debate, is a wider-ranging look at law and national security. Both volumes are distinguished by several rounds of remarkably civil -- and pointed -- disagreements on topics that�include executive power, National Security Letters, targeted killing, and a range of cybersecurity topics. via www.skatingonstilts.com Continue reading
The latest draft cybersecurity bill contains information sharing provisions that were heavily negotiated between the Obama administration and privacy groups. This effort at compromise has yielded the usual ambiguous praise from privacy groups. The Electronic Frontier Foundation pronounced itself "pleased" but then complained that the measure still "contains broad language around the ability for companies to use security as a reason to partake in 'nearly unlimited' data monitoring of users." In fact, the privacy groups have added so much baggage to the information sharing provisions that the new law is nearly useless to private sector companies who want to improve... Continue reading
On July 25, 2012, The Washington Post’s published an editorial entitled “Slipping through the ’Net” in its mobile edition or “Stockpiling arms against cyberattacks” in its regular online edition querying why there is so much “complacency” in the face of evidence and reports that “the current strategic cyber environment is... Continue reading
Posted Jul 27, 2012 at Crossroads
According to the UPI on June 9, 2012 at 1:04 PM, “Defense lawyers have asked that the Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, trial of the alleged mastermind of the USS Cole bombing in 2000 be televised in the United States.” This strikes me as a stunningly irresponsible request which makes the lawyers appear to be tools of al Qaeda rather than defenders of rights. It is hard to imagine how the defendants -– or career-minded lawyers, for that matter – could resist using a live, world-wide broadcast to spread their own message. Perhaps worse, some attorney reportedly taunted: “If we really believe... Continue reading
A May 21, 2012 report from the Congressional Research Service entitled U.S.-EU Cooperation Against Terrorism is now available on this site and from Federation of American Scientists at this link. The table of contents includes: Background on European Union Efforts Against Terrorism U.S.-EU Counterterrorism Cooperation: Progress to Date and Ongoing Challenges Developing U.S.-EU Links New Law Enforcement and Intelligence Cooperation Agreements Tracking and Suppressing Terrorist Financing Promoting Information-Sharing and Protecting Data Privacy The U.S.-EU SWIFT Accord Passenger Name Record (PNR) Data U.S.-EU Framework Agreement on Data Protection Strengthening Border Controls and Transport Security Aviation and Air Cargo Security Maritime Cargo... Continue reading
The May 29th, 2012, New York Times has a lengthy report including a photograph and graphics on the current Administration's counterterrorism policy. According to the Times: Mr. Obama has placed himself at the helm of a top secret “nominations” process to designate terrorists for kill or capture, of which the capture part has become largely theoretical. You can read the entire article at this link: Secret ‘Kill List’ Tests Obama’s Principles - NYTimes.com Continue reading
In May of 2012, the academic journal Perspectives on Terrorism released its list of "Top 150 Books on Terrorism and Counterterrorism". Author Joshua Sinai states: “This listing of top 150 books is intended to provide an overview of many of the discipline’s pre-eminent books.” The books are divided into 17 non-exclusive categories: (i) encyclopedias and reference resources, (ii) textbooks and general histories, (iii) using the social, behavioral, and economic sciences to study terrorism, (iv) journalistic case studies, (v) case studies of terrorist groups, (vi) root causes of terrorism, (vii) radicalization and recruitment into terrorism, (viii) funding terrorism, (ix) suicide terrorism,... Continue reading
Of course, a very great deal has been reported about the May 5, 2012 arraignment of Khalid Sheikh Mohammed and four co-defendants on charges brought before a military commission. We expect to look at this situation in detail during the fall 2012 term of Prosecuting Terrorists at Syracuse University College of Law. For now, I wanted to share and save this link to The Economist’s coverage of the event, because The Economist plays a bit part in the proceedings: The 13-hour arraignment was described as a circus by some observers. The defendants, not surprisingly, would not recognise the court. They... Continue reading
Passing along John Bellinger's post about the coverage of John Brennan's speech acknowledging the drone warfare campaign and offering legal arguments in support of it. John Brennan’s Speech: The Tree that Fell in the Forest?. Continue reading
The May 4, 2012 edition of “This Week on Foreign Affairs.com features the article, A Clunky Cyberstrategy: Washington Preaches Internet Freedom But Practices Surveillance by Rebecca McKinnon. According to the article’s summary: As the White House sanctions Iran and Syria for using technology to target their citizens, other parts of... Continue reading
Posted May 4, 2012 at Crossroads
William Snyder added a favorite at Crossroads
Apr 6, 2012
On April 5, Harvard will host a live, webcast seminar described as: Co-hosted with the International Review of the Red Cross In order to enrich discussions among humanitarian professionals regarding principled engagement with armed groups, this Live Web Seminar, jointly convened by the Program on Humanitarian Policy and Conflict Research (HPCR ) and the International Review of the Red Cross (IRRC), will shed light on armed groups and the law applicable to them. For more information about the event including a complete write-up, panelist information and additional resources, please visit www.hpcrresearch.org Participation is free, but you must register in advance:... Continue reading
On April 4, 2012, Brookings will hold a symposium and live webcast (so that we all may see it): Event Summary In February, President Obama signed an aviation bill that will open domestic skies to “unmanned aircraft systems,” more commonly known as drones. The coming proliferation of domestic drones raises a set of important privacy, safety, and national security questions. For instance, to what extent will it be legal for drones to hover 300 feet above residential neighborhoods snapping pictures into backyards and windows? What level of human-in-the-loop control is needed to ensure safety in a crowded airspace? And how... Continue reading
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5. Terrorism. Gen. Hayden said that Al Qaeda's ability to harm any country has been much reduced. Thus, future terrorist attacks will likely be less organized and less likely to succeed. However, that means that there may be more of them. Continue reading
Someone has leaked a March 14, 2012, Congressional Research Service report entitled Cybersecurity: Selected Legal Issues. (Such leaks are a daily occurrence and likely done by a member of Congress, but the institution as a whole has never authorized the routine release of CRS reports to the taxpayers.) Topics include: Legal Issues Related to Protecting Critical Infrastructure Deference to Agency Decisions Availability of Judicial Review Questions of Fact Interpretations of Law Liability Concerns Proprietary and Confidential Business Information Legislation in the 112th Congress H.R. 3674, the PRECISE Act of 2011 S. 2105, the Cybersecurity Act of 2012 Legal Issues Related... Continue reading
Someone has leaked a March 14, 2012, Congressional Research Service report entitled Cybersecurity: Selected Legal Issues. (Such leaks are a daily occurrence and likely done by a member of Congress, but the institution as a whole has never authorized the routine release of CRS reports to the taxpayers.) Topics include:... Continue reading
Posted Mar 29, 2012 at Crossroads
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One reason to believe the Stuxnet attack was made in the USA, Clarke says, “was that it very much had the feel to it of having been written by or governed by a team of Washington lawyers.” “What makes you say that?” I asked. “Well, first of all, I’ve sat... Continue reading
Reblogged Mar 29, 2012 at Crossroads
William Snyder is now following Stewart Baker
Mar 24, 2012
ZDNet reports on March 14, 2012, that the National Institute of Standards of Technology is offering grant money “to establish an independent steering committee led by the private sector that works in conjunction with the federal government to support” the National Strategy for Trusted Identities in Cyberspace, quoting Jeremy Grant,... Continue reading
Posted Mar 14, 2012 at Crossroads
ZDNet reports on March 14, 2012, that the National Institute of Standards of Technology is offering grant money “to establish an independent steering committee led by the private sector that works in conjunction with the federal government to support” the National Strategy for Trusted Identities in Cyberspace, quoting Jeremy Grant,... Continue reading
Posted Mar 14, 2012 at NS-TIC