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Terri Windling
Dartmoor, in England's West Country
Writer, artist, book editor, folklorist.
Interests: myth and mythic arts
Recent Activity
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Today, folk/bluegrass/American roots music from the troubled, soulful, very beautiful country I was born in.... Above: "Here and Heaven" by classical cellist Yo-Yo Ma, mandolin master Chris Thile (playing gamba and mandolin here), bluegrass fiddler & banjo player Stuart Duncan,... Continue reading
Posted yesterday at Myth & Moor
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"When you enter the woods of a fairy tale, it is night and trees tower on either side of the path. They loom large because everything in the world of fairy tales is blown out of proportion. If the owl... Continue reading
Posted 4 days ago at Myth & Moor
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I followed my reading of Richard Powers' The Overstory (discussed yesterday) with Robert Macfarlane's new book, Underland: A Deep Time Journey -- which proved to be a perfect pairing. Underland is an absolutely brilliant exploration of the various underworlds to... Continue reading
Posted 4 days ago at Myth & Moor
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I've finally read Overstory by Richard Powers -- a sprawling novel composed of interlocked stories about people, trees, and the relationship between them -- and I highly recommend it to all who are interested in the intersection of nature, art... Continue reading
Posted 5 days ago at Myth & Moor
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I'll be away for a long weekend as of mid-day today, then back in the studio again on Wednesday, 12 June. I will do my best to catch up on comments, email, and messenges next week, with apologies to those... Continue reading
Posted Jun 7, 2019 at Myth & Moor
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The mystical Celtic Christian tradition -- which has come down to us through the writings of the peregrini, among others -- informs the work of Irish poet, philosopher, and theological scholar John O'Donohue (1956-2008), often quoted here on Myth &... Continue reading
Posted Jun 6, 2019 at Myth & Moor
Sara and Mo: You're welcome. It's such a pleasure to share these delightful foals...and I have more photos that I'll post in the days ahead.
Toggle Commented Jun 6, 2019 on The language of the animate earth at Myth & Moor
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It's one of my favourite-ever videos. Art-making...puppies...what could be better?
Toggle Commented Jun 6, 2019 on Something to do with love at Myth & Moor
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I was woken at that hour by my beast too (although at almost 10 years old, she's far from her pup days). I've been wide awake ever since, while Tilly has gone back to bed...
Toggle Commented Jun 6, 2019 on Something to do with love at Myth & Moor
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From an interview with David Foster Wallace in The Contemporary Literature Review: "I've gotten convinced that there's something kind of timelessly vital and sacred about good writing. This thing doesn't have that much to do with talent, even glittering talent.... Continue reading
Posted Jun 5, 2019 at Myth & Moor
I'm very glad to hear this, Rosie, and wish you well following the road. May your writing and your activism flourish in tandem. Nature-based fantasy writing is a thing I feel very strongly about.
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Yes, I read it years ago, when I was living in Apache country in Arizona. It's a truly wonderful book. David discusses it in Spell of Sensuous too.
Toggle Commented Jun 5, 2019 on The language of the animate earth at Myth & Moor
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Isn't that James Wright poem lovely? It's one of my favourites.
Toggle Commented Jun 5, 2019 on The language of the animate earth at Myth & Moor
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I love days like that so much.
Toggle Commented Jun 5, 2019 on The language of the animate earth at Myth & Moor
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A pleasure.
Toggle Commented Jun 5, 2019 on The language of the animate earth at Myth & Moor
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David was a thoroughly Magical Being, and I am so glad he was in my life.
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I'm finishing the week's discussion of wild plant lore with two relevant posts from the archives. Here's the second.... This has been a good year for the foxgloves, which started their bloom early in June and are still brightening the... Continue reading
Posted Jun 5, 2019 at Myth & Moor
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From The Spell of the Sensuous: Perception & Language in a More-Than-Human World by David Abram: "The sense of being immersed in a sentient world is preserved in the oral stories of indigenous peoples --in the belief that sensible phenomena... Continue reading
Posted Jun 5, 2019 at Myth & Moor
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Herbalist Theresa Green says: "Common hogweed was once employed in medicine, although its use has been long out of favour. Long ago the seeds were boiled in oil that was then recommended for application to running sores and to treat the rash associated with shingles. Culpeper recommended a decoction of the seeds to be applied to running ears. "Hogweed shoots have a high vitamin C content and the plant is still eaten in some places. The young shoots are collected early in the season and the tender young stems, cut into pieces about 15cm long may be boiled in salted water for about 15 minutes, then drained and served with butter. Apparently they make an ideal accompaniment to meat dishes. "(WARNING! This family of plants contains many poisonous species and correct identification is essential before even thinking about eating them.)" Her blog, Everyday Nature Trails, which she writes from North Wales, is lovely. https://theresagreen.me/
Toggle Commented Jun 5, 2019 on More folklore of the wild flowers at Myth & Moor
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Never!!! Madeleine L'Engle once said: “I used to feel guilty about spending morning hours working on a book; about fleeing to the brook in the afternoon. It took several summers of being totally frazzled by September to make me realize that this was a false guilt. I'm much more use to family and friends when I'm not physically and spiritually depleted than when I spend my energies as though they were unlimited. They are not. The time at the typewriter and the time at the brook refresh me and put me into a more workable perspective.” Have you read her Crosswick journals? If you like memoir, they're wonderful.
Toggle Commented Jun 5, 2019 on Wild healing at Myth & Moor
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Oh Cath, thank you so much. I can't think of higher praise. I'm going to go look for that Mark Vernon essay, which sounds like one I don't want to miss. I've been re-reading Martin Shaw's brilliant book Scatterling his week, and marvelling at his use of language, which is a perfect example of what Simon Armitage is talking about. (And hurrah for the fact that Armitage is our new Poet Laureate! Although I'm waiting for Alice Oswald's turn....) Jay Griffiths is another writer whose use of language leaves me in awe (in books like "Wild," "Kith," and "Tristomania"), reminding me to try to be a little more courageous in "couloring outside the lines" with my own.
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You're clearly raising that boy right!
Toggle Commented Jun 5, 2019 on The folklore of nettles at Myth & Moor
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Sarah, Ruth, Pat and Sidney: Thank you for you kind comments.
Toggle Commented Jun 5, 2019 on The folklore of nettles at Myth & Moor
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Interesting questions, Sarah. I think part of the difference is that the Grimms were presenting the tales as folklore, and favored using a plainer style of language that echoed the oral tradition of unlettered country folk (despite the fact that the informants from whom they gained most of tales were middle class, educated women...but that's another story). Hans Christian Anderson, by contrast, was a literary writer, not a re-teller of folklore. He used material from the folk tradition, but crafted it into literary works; so his tales, in general, are more full of description, and go deeper into the emotional responses of his characters. For more about the history of Grimms fairy tales, I recommend Valerie Paradiz's book Clever Maids, if you haven't read it already. More on Hans Christian Andersen, his life and tales, here: https://www.terriwindling.com/mythic-arts/hca.html
Toggle Commented Jun 5, 2019 on The folklore of nettles at Myth & Moor
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I love the idea of Old Nettle Woman, Diane. Thank you for sharing her.
Toggle Commented Jun 5, 2019 on The folklore of nettles at Myth & Moor
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