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Wouterlefebvre
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Randall, interesting read. One question, if these northerly winds are the climatological normal at that location, how does it come that some years have and some have no SSW's?
You're the one to be thanked Neven, you made the graphs, I used them.
Toggle Commented Aug 5, 2012 on New CAPIE record at Arctic Sea Ice
Neven, I used some of your excellent graphs on a post on Arctic sea ice on the Dutch-speaking weerwoord forum (http://www.weerwoord.be/includes/forum_read.php?id=1659808&tid=1659808)
Toggle Commented Aug 5, 2012 on New CAPIE record at Arctic Sea Ice
@Rob: I'm already a reader of neven's site since the last melt season, although I'm not commenting often. I'll continue reading, and if I think that I can add to the discussion, I'll comment.
Toggle Commented Jul 25, 2012 on Peeking through the clouds at Arctic Sea Ice
@Rob: the model was only used in retrospective mode, so it was forced by the ERA40 or the NCEP reanalysis. As such it took into account NAO/AO and its southern ocean equivalents (which were the most important for me). However, the model can also be coupled to an atmospheric model, which I did not do, but others did. Wouter
Toggle Commented Jul 25, 2012 on Peeking through the clouds at Arctic Sea Ice
Wouterlefebvre added a favorite at Arctic Sea Ice
Jul 24, 2012
@Neven: in my opinion you're both correct and not correct. You're correct that wind speeds in low pressure areas is higher than in high pressure areas; indeed, the isobars tend to be closer in low pressure areas than in high pressure areas. However, the effect seems negligable to me. The centrifugal acceleration is equal to v²/r ( see for instance http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Centrifugal_force ). Let's try some numbers: v = 20 m/s (not bad wind speed already) and r = 500 km = 500000m, we get an a of 0.0008 m/s². This seems quite small to me; indeed, I always learned that on these scales the coriolis force is dominant (wiki: "In low-pressure systems, centrifugal force is negligible and balance is between Coriolis and pressure forces." http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Coriolis_force ). Hmmm..., on a side note, I have the impression that my knowledge on this is getting a bit rusty, too long that I'm not in climate sciences anymore (since 2008).
Toggle Commented Jul 24, 2012 on Peeking through the clouds at Arctic Sea Ice
@Neven: you're not in trouble with the third dimension, as you cover three dimensions very well (two horizontal + time dimension). You just have to cope with one more. ;-) @Artful Dodger: Coupled sea-ice ocean models do take into account Ekman transport and Ekman pumping; as these are major players in the sea-ice world. I have been working myself with this type of models, hence the knowledge. Some links to my previous work (all on the other side of the world): http://www.agu.org/pubs/crossref/2004/2004JC002403.shtml http://www.ocean-sci.net/1/145/2005/os-1-145-2005.html http://www.agu.org/pubs/crossref/2008/2006JC004032.shtml http://www.springerlink.com/content/m262u05132584004/ If anyone interested in one of these papers, do not hesitate to contact me: wouterlefebvre at hotmail (you know what follows)
Toggle Commented Jul 24, 2012 on Peeking through the clouds at Arctic Sea Ice
@Rob: this seems correct to me. As you get divergence of the water and ice in the low pressure area, water will be pumped up in the centre of the low (Ekman pumping).
Toggle Commented Jul 24, 2012 on Peeking through the clouds at Arctic Sea Ice
All, what you're discussing is the Ekman spiral and the Ekman transport. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ekman_transport Ekman is a known Swedish Oceanographer who was the first to discuss this point. Wouter
Toggle Commented Jul 23, 2012 on Peeking through the clouds at Arctic Sea Ice
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Jul 23, 2012