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Nice analysis and write-up Casandra. I enjoyed reading it. I applaud new approaches and experiments such as holograms and pay-per-stream. How else would we find new ways to connect with fans? I'm a big fan of raising awareness about live shows. I think with the increase in access to more music through streaming services, we discover more and more new artists that we didn't used to before. So we attended fewer shows for only the artists we were big fans of. I believe this is changing now. With so much access to music we enjoy more artists and even though we may not consider ourselves fans yet, we would be more open to seeing them live in more intimate settings for cheaper prices. I think this is a great direction for live music. Also I read that report and the numbers I'm seeing are different. Is there a different report your numbers are coming from? This is the report link I was looking at: http://www.prsformusic.com/aboutus/corporateresources/reportsandpublications/addinguptheindustry2011/Documents/Economic%20Insight%2011%20Dec.pdf "Live revenues reached £1.6bn in 2011 – which was a substantial increase from 2010's total of £1.4bn. Festivals and arena concerts are the most significant areas in the live music industry, each accounting for around 25 percent of the market. A dramatic increase in stadium concerts helped spur on growth in 2011."
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I'm definitely a fan of this concept. Best of luck to Tunezy!
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Nice move from MTV. I imagine Echonest is behind this. Some of these artists are already quite popular, selling out shows, such as The Weeknd, Zedd, Alt-J but remembering the "Who the hell is Arcade Fire?" tweets when they won a Grammy, it's safe to assume the MTV audience probably never heard of these artists either. In any case, it's great that they are taking the initiative to educate.
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This could be interesting. The tight integration with Beats headphones is a bit sketchy but it is true that none of the music services got the discovery right since Apple bought Lala. I remember we were using Lala all the time to stumble upon new stuff. Spotify's new announcement promises that to change so fingers crossed. Looking at Trent's comments, it seems his heart is at the right place. I'm a huge believer in curation and algorithms working together so this gets me excited. Looking forward to checking it out. Anything that introduces a new artist to me makes me smile...
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Clyde, I like this a lot. The design is refreshingly clean and minimalistic for a music service. I've been noticing a lot of indie bands prefer selling their music direct to fans on Bandcamp as opposed to getting fractions of cents per stream on streaming services. So fan profiles serve a great purpose to take that one step further and get fans more involved in the equation, rather than just a transaction site. I personally haven't really used Bandcamp but these profiles make me want to discover some bands on here, purchase their music and create my own beautiful looking profile. So from a fan psychology perspective it definitely works. As next steps, I would imagine if they take this towards touring and merchandising, again keep the social fan component in mind, I see nothing but success.
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Hisham, just signed up with MusicPlayr now. Followed a few people and started listening to my stream. Positive first impressions. I'm all for any service that's thoughtfully built, that helps me discover more music. Curious to see if web-based discovery catches on. I personally prefer using apps for discovery, especially while I'm on the go, on mobile apps. The HTML5 vs native debate, however, continues. Clearly this team is betting on a more open, platform independent discovery. Congratulations on the funding and best of luck to the team.
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Bruce, I'm skeptical about the prospects of this redesign attracting more fans to the site. I find it hard to believe, a corporate giant the size of TicketMaster / LiveNation holds a place in fans' hearts to convince them to share their social activities on their site. If you poll people on the streets you will find out that most people hate the company due to its monopoly status and fees, etc. And social behavior is driven by loyalty and love towards a service. People share on Instagram, Path, Foursquare because they love the service. Who would say they love "Livenation"? Reason is clear, when you're a public company your top priority is servicing your stockholders and not your customers. That priority changes everything. Having said that, the concept of Live Nation Labs is solid. It fits perfectly with Harvard professor Clayton Christensen's concepts in his book Innovator's Dilemma. Basically if you're a large corporation, you will be disrupted by smaller players because you move slow, you have a lot of red tape in your organization and your managers aren't motivated to take risks. The way to overcome this, is to spin off a division, set it up like a startup and innovate through it. That's what Live Nation Labs looks to me like. And the guy heading it up, Ethan Kaplan, seems like he really understands the startup culture and that's very important to their success. I'm just curious if they are finding the freedoms they need under that umbrella. It should be interesting to watch if Live Nation Labs starts cranking out innovative solutions around live music despite its parent. I'm curious to see how it plays out...
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Those numbers look "unrealistically" high. In any case, yes I do believe labels need to focus more in touring, considering more than 90% of the artists' revenue comes from shows. Especially now in the streaming world, where one Spotify stream is 1/200th's (even smaller according to other sources) of one download.
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MTV has no relevance today in new music discovery. The people who are actually interested in discovering new music have no respect for what MTV stands for today and will continue to use services who are the innovators in the space. The O Music Awards is a joke. They select random nominees themselves and make new nominee qualification decisions without understanding the categories they created - such as Best Music Hack. As they play catch up, the innovators in the space will keep pushing forward and continue delivering even more value to music lovers. People who work on Last.fm, The Echo Nest, Soundcloud, Hype Machine and many other music startups get it and continue to innovate.
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Apr 13, 2011